Annapolis Sunday Capital, May 5, 2013

Annapolis Sunday Capital

May 05, 2013

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Issue date: Sunday, May 5, 2013

Pages available: 80

Previous edition: Sunday, April 28, 2013

Next edition: Sunday, May 12, 2013 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: Annapolis Sunday Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

Pages available: 40,843

Years available: 1996 - 2016

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Annapolis Sunday Capital (Newspaper) - May 5, 2013, Annapolis, Maryland capitalgazette .com A Capital-Gazette Newspaper ® — Annapolis, MDDowntown activist takes on new role as city alderman ARUNDEL REPORT / B1Orb wins muddy Kentucky Derby Free valet parking for Mothers Day at Annapolis Towne Centre, COUPON / C5 >PORTS / ClGET YOUR COUPONS: As much as $213 worth of money-saving coupons in today s paper SEARCHING FOR THE So far, the few who have been hurt in county haven’t drawn attention By TIM PRUDENTE [email protected] Congratulations, you survived. You’re still here in spite of those doomsday budget cuts that would topple the economy, crumple national defense, flatten government workers, lay low the middle class and send the whole country hurtling off yet another fiscal cliff. What, don’t you remember? Does the word “sequestration” ring a bell? Democrats predicted crisis. Republi cans yawned. The national media egged them on. And yes, you had better believe it, we’ve been sequestered. It arrived March 1, with about $1 trillion in across-the board spending cuts to federal agencies. Surely, Anne Arundel County residents would feel all that belt-tightening. But where? And who? So began our Great Sequester Search. The findings: anything but expected. (See SEQUESTER, Page A8) FEDERAL CIVILIAN WORKERS IN ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY In February, it was announced these workers might be furloughed 22 days, one day per week. Notices were sent out in April. In March, it was announced notices would be delayed until May, and furlough days cut from 22 to 14. In April, officials backtracked further, saying they were still evaluating whether to furlough civilians. A May 1 announcement said a decision will be made in the “near future." “We’re all waiting,” said Meade spokeswoman Mary Doyle. More than 500 civilians work at a Coast Guard shipbuilding yard in Curtis Bay. They're employees of the Department of Homeland Security. U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., warned Congress that their jobs would be threatened by the sequester. And now? “We don’t anticipate any kind of furloughs going on here at the yard,” said spokeswoman Dottie Mitchell. ‘Not all of thesp people work for the Department of Defense. Some work for the Environmental Protection Agency, or the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, for example. The specific number of Defense Department employees at the base is unclear. **The Coast Guard says it will not have to furlough civilians. SOME EFFECTS OF SEQUESTRATION IN ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY • The Army Field Band, stationed at Fort Meade, canceled a spring concert tour to the Southeast. Instead, it will perform within 150 miles of the base. • The Naval Academy canceled plans to send 170 midshipmen to study abroad in countries such as China, Japan, Italy, France, Russia and Spain. • The popular Blue Angels Navy aerobatic team won’t perform in Annapolis at the annual Naval Academy Commissioning Week this month. • The county’s Head Start program saw its funding cut by about 5 percent, or $157,000. The program serves more than 400 children, ages 3 to 5, from low-income families. Vacation paid for by state’s taxpayers? Hotel reward points a perk of being a lawmaker By ALEX JACKSON [email protected] Somewhere, a Maryland lawmaker could be planning a vacation that will be paid for with rewards he or she earned on the state’s dime. Under its ethics rules, the General Assembly allows legislators who stay at hotels at state expense to take advantage of benefits those hotels offer, as long as the ben- efits are offered to every guest alike, jiq[ agOHlSt not specifically to ,    ,    . , the rules, it s not hurting anyone. ... I'm not sure that benefits the slate in any wa y to have bunch Westin Annapo 0f unhappy lis, the Annapolis /    .    .    '    '    - Marriott Water legislators. front and Hilton \ j . r hotels like the And UlOSt OJ DoubleTree and m worf{ Very the Hampton Inn .    .    .    • hard. I know I do. lawmakers. Those benefits can go well beyond a continental breakfast. According to legislators and of ficials of watchdog groups, delegates and senators often take advantage of Del. Jolene Ivey D-Prince George’s. & Suites. A 90-night stay at the Westin can earn enough points for a couple of nights free at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort & Casino in the Bahamas. Points earned at a Hilton property can be redeemed for clothing, electronics, hotel stays and jewelry from Tiffany & Co. One legislator who asked not to be named called it a “really sweet perk” that a lot of legislators use and take into consideration (See REWARDS, Page A12) STORMWATER: HOW WE GOT HERE I FIRST IN A TWO-PART SERIESToday’s efforts follow 400 years of development, failed strategies By E.B. FURGURSON III pfurgurson(fl Anne Arundel County’s nearly $1 billion stormwater problem probably started about 400 years ago, soon after Capt. John Smith explored the pristine Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. We have been changing the landscape ever since. The earliest settlers cut trees to clear fields for farming and get fuel and building materials.COMING MONDAY Part 2: How to fix waterways, and the county program designed to do the job. Agriculture came to dominate the landscape. Then, as the Industrial Revolution spurred population growth, communities popped up across the land scape. Just before and after World War II, the building boom was going full tilt, and communities of modest homes replaced fertile farmland in north county Brooklyn, Linthi-cum, Glen Bumie. During the post-war years, suburbia sprawled out. The automobile drastically changed the landscape and paved roads connected neighborhoods to jobs in the city and new (See WATER, Page All) A roughly 3-meter cliff with dangling roots and falling trees, cut by stormwater, looms over a small stream along Harry S. Truman Parkway. By Joshua McKerrow. Staff SUNDAY'S WEATHER 61 47 HIGH LOW SOME SUN Monday: Showers. B2 LIFESTYLE I ARUNDEL REPORT I I COMING MONDAYl KEEPING TIME: Davidsonville drummer has busy schedule as band member, teacher, writer, consultant, director. D1 BOUNTIFUL BARBECUE: Naptown barBayq Contest & Music Festival draws big crowd at Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds. B1 my Like us on Facebook SUB capitalgazette LACROSSE TOURNEY TIME: A look at the NCAA Tournament draw for the Navy women and Maryland men and women. jTjl Follow us on Twitter ^3 capgaznews « Ìli...... General................410 268-5000 Classified .....410-268-7000 Circulation...........410-268-4800 o o C\J in r^- oo o 4 sections, 40 pages Business Calendar B6    Classified ......................C8 B3    Death Notices ...............B2 Editorial ......................AIO Health & Fitness............D3 Lottery ..........................A4    Obituaries .....................B2    Television......................C7 My Time........................B8    Puzzles........................Cll    Volunteers................  A7 hHHHI U.S. Naval Academy: noncontract employees of the Department of Defense Fort George G. Meade: 39,654 federal employees' Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard: 500 more than civilian employees of the Department of Homeland Security' Graphic by Shannon Miller, Staff: File photos ;