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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: October 1, 1995 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - October 1, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland                               It's now up to the MORE NATIONAL COUPONS INSIDE TODAY AND EVERY SUNDAY DCTO ARCHIVES 312 LAUREL AVE AUFEL MD 20707 NAVY J44 win over Duke Cl Gtmi McCoy wafte onceajaki Crack sting inCrofton OCTOBER 1994 yearbook photo HoUy Rteoto died hi May. The Queen Aime's County Department to Invert Igniting the two deputies who found her In her apart- Woman's death probed Deputies allegedly failed to give her immediate aid By JOHN KEILMAN Kent Island Staff Writer The Queen Anne's County Sher- iffs Department is investigating whether two deputies cost a young Chester woman her life by failing to give her immediate medical aid. Holly Ricole was discovered unconscious in her apartment with her baby in her arms on May 25. An autopsy later showed she died of cardiac ar- rhythmia an irregular heart- beat. Veteran deputies William E. Givens and Kimberley E. Hanifee not give cardiopulmonary re- suscitation to Ms. O'Brien until a .paramedic arrived Sheriff Charles F. Crossley Jr. said. The sheriffs probe into the death has taken four and the County Commissioners are unhappy with that pace. Some also question. Sheriff Crossley's decision to leave the deputies on street patrol during the I were the sheriff and I thought perhaps there might be some kind of even I think I would have suspended that person pending the Commissioner Mark Belton said. According to Sheriff Ms. O'Brien was talking to her mother on the phone when she out or became sick. Her mother called 911. A dispatcher alerted telling them to at O'Brien's apartment off Route When Deputy Hanifee and Dep- uty Givens they knocked but got no response. A building manager opened the and they found Ms. O'Brien uncon- scious. At that the sheriff the deputies did not perform car- diopulmonary but .called for an ambulance and waited. Ms. O'Brien did not receive CPR until a paramedic Sheriff Crossley said. She was Page Justice slow in county By BRIAN WHEELER Staff Writer As the head of Grandparents a group that pushes for grandparents to have greater clout in domestic court Gail Martin hears a lot of com- plaints about the legal system. But if there's one gripe the Pasadena resident hears in al- most every regardless of the it's how slowly the system works. the length of time it takes cases to get she said. of our even in visitation or custody have to wait months just to get a court According to just-compiled state averages for the 1995 fiscal Waiting time for a court date higher than the state average cases crawl through Anne Arundel County' Circuit Court more slowly than the statewide 'average. Defendants in criminal cases can expect to wait 166 days for trial. That is 20 days longer than state average. And people in civil cases can expect a 373 day delay 83 days 'longer than the average. Court officials can't pinpoint a single reason for the county's and note that there has been minor improvement since last 'year's average. But the local legal system's lack of efficiency has prompted an overhaul of the way cases are scheduled. Within the next five the court .will take total control of all cases' timetables out of the hands of lawyers even the county State's Attorney's Office. committed to getting the docket under and under control of the said Robert G. the Circuit Court's administrator. we're going to do court officials will take the first step on their road to total case taking over the scheduling of all family- related such as divorces and child custody. going to get rid of the stuff that can be handled. And if you need to go to you'll get your Wallace said. Just how much legal delays cost is a gray area. Jail officials say it costs about a day to house an inmate awaiting trial and roughly half of the 750 people now in the county detention cen- ter have yet to get their day in court. It would cost taxpayers less to have fewer inmates in but much of the figure comes from fixed such as Page Justice delayed The average length of time to bring a case to tnal in Anne Atundel County Circuit Court has dropped In the last year but still remains higher than state aver- ages for civil and criminal cases. Average number of days awaiting trial County State 1994 1995 1994 1995 Civil Criminal Source Maryland Court administrator e Capital graphic Better known to the loflorts ofmUtwho through the Naval Academy's Eeetport native Ernest Smith Is one ofaeveral have worked at the Stability is dream of Navy's civilians Academy workers part of loyal family' s By BrwMyPenMon 'llw Capital By BRADLEY PENISTON Staff Writer everna Park native Dorothy D. Kasey got her first job a temporary summer position at the Naval Academy at age 16 was a natural thing. It's a historic place. It offered you a chance for security. It seemed like everyone wanted to work for the Naval said Ms. who joined several aunts and uncles in coming to work at the school Almost 20 years she's a manager in its warehouse-like laundry facility. When the academy was founded on the banks of the Severn River in it gave 1 the Navy a wellspring for its officer corps and renewed Annapolis' faded prestige. But then and to local civilians like Ms. it meant secure jobs. For nearly a the academy was the city's biggest employer. Today it has slipped to but a payroll of some million flows into the pockets of more than civilian according to academy officials. Yet the recent rash of job cuts and privatization at some federal and military like those across UNITED STATES the Severn River at the Naval Surface Warfare has some employees worried. fear a little bit about Ms. Kasey said. kind of scary. I still have 15 years to before she wants to retire. But the academy appears to be hanging tough. Earlier this academy Superintendent Adm Charles R. Larson secured a promise of two years' stable funding from the Pentagon. And local business groups predict that the academy will nde out the downsizing tide with few ill effects will not be as volatile as other federal said Rosemary marketing director for the-Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp. Perhaps the most renowned of academy laborers was Edwin who worked at the academy from 1848 until 1910. He saw superintendents come and professors gain and CIVILIANS. Page John Paul HVM again at the Naval ___ I Workers ifack up hours in Aug. sick leave ByBARTJANSEN Staff Writer The cold-and-flu season hasn't arrived but county Public Works Department employees racked up nearly hours of sick leave in August. Workers used even more sick time than in when one-third of the county's largest department took ill at some point. administration officials expressed concern and talked at ways to limit the use of sick ave. don't think our opinion has the last monthly said Robert as- nt director of Public are equally as disappointed i of the problem stemmed hot which forced road pavers to take disabil- time county and union said. are equally as disappointed this Robert _______Public Works official Workers also donated vacation time which showed up as sick leave to colleagues suffering brain cancer and heart said Jim president of American Federation of County and Municipal Employees Local 582. Precise figures on heat-related problems or donated time-weren't available from the county. you're seeing is enor- mously inflated Mr. Bestpitch said. seeing the wrong The August report said 380 workers used hours of ability an average of days for each employee. The July report showed that 338 workers took off hours. Average use of sick leave coun- tywide and among state workers wasn't available. County workers earn 15 days of sick leave per year and can accu- mulate them over time. Workers often schedule surger- ies during when recup- eration is more comfortable or if a spouse works in the school syt- officials have said. Employees suffering from leng- Page LOW Mostly sunny today and tomonrow. 08 T3T 'Boys visit It might be the Cowboys vs. Redskins. it's hard to ignore the records this time. Not that you could ever write off the chance of an upset at IV vs. l p.m. on Fox channel 5. Fall boat shows buoy Annapolis' reputation. Bl HUM BGE's other business. Bl MTUO TO Choose your service provider carefully. H COMHIMUb Modem quality a matter of flltltftSlf A lot of creativity before the beep. U DAVI Amphibians make headline news. Rl i Grandparents' A mixed blessing. 14 Pilgrims drawn to Kennedy grave. Arundel Report ..01 .A10-11 Business.........Bl Lottaiy.........A4 Classified. ..Fl-14 Movies..... E2 Crossword E6 Obituaries D2 Comics'...........Gl PoHceBeat D2   

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