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Annapolis Capital: Wednesday, September 27, 1995 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - September 27, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland                               School board's job description debated Dl QB CHANGE Terps bench 4-0 Cummlngs in favor of Milanovlch Cl 2 county women get the word out on nutrition Bl MICROFILMS 1558 MD 20707 HOWELL PO BOX LAUREL PAGE A15 WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER MD 364 Teachers wary after abuse claims By LESLIE GROSS Staff Writer During the last school 135 teachers were accused of child sexual harassment or mis- conduct a wave of allegations that has had a chilling effect on county teachers. Although most of the cases were found to be teachers are still said John R. president of the Teachers Associa- tion of Anne Arundel County. are really demoral- he said. innocent touching in elementary a hand on the someone is likely to go home and 'Mr. Jones touched Eighty-two teachers were re- ported for allegedly committing child abuse and 13 for sexual Mr. Kurpjuweit said. The rest were accused of miscon- duct. J. Mark supervisor of investigative services and records said 23 of the 135 cases resulted in disciplinary ac- including 11 four seven substi- are really demoralized. What's innocent touching in elementary a hand on the someone is likely to go home and 'Mr. Jones touched R. teachers association tutes removed from the substitute list and one substitute given a letter of reprimand. Not all cases involved because teachers suffering har- assment are included Uncon- firmed cases could stem from witnesses and victims who weren't willing to in addi- tion to problems with corrobora- he said. But based on research by TAAAC Mr. Kurpjuweit maintains that the majority of undisciplined cases are the result of false allegations made by stu- dents. School board member Michael A. Pace said the TAAAC's reac- tion about the number of allega- tions is bit consider- ing the fact that very few cases result in termination. hardly think we're talking about a witch he said. Mr. Black said state law re- quires child-care providers to re- port any suspected child abuse. But he said it's inaccurate to say most of the allegations are as opposed to those that prove to be unsubstantiated. And he said the sheer number of teachers must be taken into account when considering the number of complaints. As of the school system em- ployed teachers and class- room which means just over percent had allega- tions made against them. Page CipUl graphic Clay St. initiative proposed by Gary ByBARTJANSEN Staff Writer County Executive John G. Gary Jr. plans to establish a loan fund and a new program of job training to create businesses in the Clay Street area of Annapo- lis. The initiative was organized by the Anne Arundel Economic De- velopment a job-training and recruiting group. The effort is part of the county's response to layoffs announced last week at Westinghouse Electric Corp. striving for improved economic we can't for- get the small the mom-and-pop which are the backbone of the local com- Mr. Gary said. His proposal will be completed and unveiled in a few weeks. The announcement comes as Mr. Gary must cope with Westing- house the bulk of which ore expected in the electronic systems group near Baltimore- Washington International Air- port Rather than focus attention on national Mr. Gary's administration plans to recruit and encourage small businesses. An estimated 95 percent of county businesses employ 20 or fewer officials said. has for some time wanted US to put more focus on economic development of neighborhood said Michael S. head of the Economic Development Corp The county executive also wel- comes large companies moving to the but is focusing on businesses to help Clay Street rather than government facial said Lisa Mr. Gary's spokesman .Crime and lack of jobs in the Qay Street area have concerned officials for years since urban renewal hi the early 1970s. But solutions have been in abort supply for the area that lies bj the shadow of county head- tyiartera at the Arundel Center ind near state government build Mr. fc IN REMEMBRANCE By W. Trozzo The CepKtl About 100 paopla fathered laat night for camNaMght vigU In memory of Joanna AmoM WONMH alaki two yaara ago by MI imloiown Mrs. VatonHiw's Faith and Linda attended the raMy it ttw mvdaratta hi front of tha Vatontina at 617 Broadwatar Road. Mn. Sttanaon to IfiaMaoai Uaw MeMfc kaiatKaMul imBHlg 9UIIIIIIM JOMHWr ffWr MvCBr V IMnMUKV. VMMfufWy WHO WIUI iHw nlllMna UNI RuniDWnvi ffiafpiccfvD In vumtoi WM hi Iwc orfwwtty In vHMt Hitptct nwy IMVO raatory attampt lha murtar mmahn anaatvad. Welfare plans spark concern in the county Officials worry reform won't give enough control Bv THERESA WINSLOW IfVKNnPVlfKfVSnrm Collectors in feeding frenzy over Ripken Wheaties boxes By THERESA WINSLOW Staff Writer Call it a bit or even but Cal Ripken Jr. Wheaties boxes have become the latest version of fast food even though breakfast is probably the last thing on the minds of buyers. can't keep them in said Barry spokesman for the Handover-based Giant Food chain. the hottest thing we've ever But area residents aren't alone in their quest for the latest Cal collectibles. People from across the and particularly the Baltimore are also on a Wheaties feeding frenzy. Giant's 162 stores typically sell 150 cases of Wheaties in a week. At the rate the Ripken boxes are currently leaving the the figure has leaped to cases a Mr. Scher said. There are 16 boxes to a case He estimates the Wheaties man- ia began about 10 days after Ripken broke Lou Gehrig's streak of 2130 consecutive games. That's when the stores received their first shipment those unauthorized boxes had the Orioles name and logo airbrushed off because Gen- eral the maker of reportedly failed to get a license from Major League Baseball. Those now legendary boxes dis- appeared quickly and are now selling for to apiece. cailad tn and pteadad with DM to get aome out of tha of Chrta Sprouaa raptentohaa QrauTe hi tha ft CM hava becoma tna cowrty't coMactorr. By DevW W. Trozzo The Capital atock of Cal Rlpkan Jr. DOXM at ttwoaaig Canter yaatarday. Tha caraal boxaa form of faat aalNng by tha oaaa to By THERESA WINSLOW Staff Writer Ed Bloom used to be excited about the prospects of welfare reform. there would be less but the director of the county Department of Social Ser- vices reasoned he might end up with more control over where that money goes and make posi- tive changes. Now he's not sure what to think. concern is that they won't change or provide suffi- cient flexibility to do anything that's he said. No one really knows how re- form will affect Anne Arundel since the final version has yet to be ironed but it hasn't stopped the speculation and concerns. think the safety net will be said Annapolis Alder- man Carl 0. D-Ward 5. As of there were county residents in the Aid to Families with Dependent Chil- dren getting food stamps and receiving child- care funds although there's some overlap. Yet welfare officials say this county is better off than most and that innovative thinking will help to avert disaster. think Anne Arundel is very well poised to accept these new said Lynda dep- uty secretary for programs and local operations at the state De- partment of Human Resources. have been doing some programming that was a good precursor to welfare A House-Senate Conference Committee is hashing out a com- promise between the bills passed by both legislative bodies. The House bill is harsher and Presi- dent Clinton has indicated he'll WELFARE PICTURE Here's a snapshot of the county's welfare recipients. There's some overlap between the people receive Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Two-thirds are children. people get food stamps. families get child- care assistance. Forty to 50 percent of AFDC applicants don't meet eligibility requirements The average stay on AFDC is 22 months. The county's poverty rate is about 4.5 percent of the total but only 2 percent are helped through AFDC. There are about Impoverished residents unaided by any cash assistance programs The number of county AFDC applicants who are teen- age mothers or pregnant teens each year is about 150 3 percent of all new recipients. The greatest number is single mothers age 20 to 35. Seventy percent of AFDC recipients have a high school diploma or a GED. County Department of Social Services. veto the final measure if it leans too much in'that direction. State welfare officials are there- fore hedging their bets on some- thing similar to the Senate ver- sion. It would require recipients to get a job within two set a lifetime limit on benefits at five end entitlements and abol- Page INSIDE i Shopping Center. Mr. Fitzpatrick said the super- market never even received the unauthorized but it does have the official which are currently its No. 1 selling cereal. Mr. Scher said the official boxes with the restored Orioles moniker have been available for about one week. Residents snapping them up are from two camps genuine collec- or fhoae out to make a fast although MMM fell in be- leans more toward the collector took out a classified advertisement in The Capital yes- offering the unauthorized boxes for a pop He bought a couple of distributed the boxes among his and reserved about 20 to sell. Although Ripken is his favor- ite he said he wouldn't mind making a little profit from the streak. to be that wtt be .ft In com- puters is taken from Bancroft Hall. M KDfT A Chester animal hospital plans a unique fundraiser. A10 WOT Changes are pro- posed for dangerous Intersection. All BIO Capital Camera.... A8 Chefs Choice......Bl-3 02 B6 Lottery Kenilstand M AID of The Capfttf are printed each dav on recycled piper. The newtpeper alto ft recyclable CtaMMad....................268-7000 Circulation..................26S4MO From Kaot 827-1888 Al othar dapartmanta   

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