Annapolis Capital, September 20, 1995 : Front Page

Publication: Annapolis Capital September 20, 1995

Capital, The (Newspaper) - September 20, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland Navy fans can't go overboard SEE SPORTS Cl PAUL FARE Autumn is time for tailgate Oktoberfests Bl Clues sought in carjacking murder Dl PAGE A1B WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER MD 38 Use of drugs by county students on the rise By LESLIE GROSS Staff Writer More middle- and high-schoolers in Anne Arundel County are using drugs like marijua- LSD and inhalants than are students according to a survey released yesterday The number of county students using drugs also rose from the previous survey Nearly one-third of county seniors said they smoked marijuana in the month before filling out the 1994 compared to one-fifth of seniors in 1992. the use of drugs also increased. information is extremely state School Superintendent Nancy S. Gras- mick said. his a great deal to say about our young people and our society in Though cigarette smoking and beer and wine drinking dropped among almost three in four said they drank in the past year. Alcohol use was more widespread than any drug. More students in every age group said that in the past month they had five or more drinks on one occasion The survey found that more eighth- and loth-graders had consumed alcohol in the has a great deal to say about our young people and our society in Nancy S. school superintendent past compared to statewide averages for those age groups The Maryland Adolescent con- ducted every two years by the Department of questioned students from 10th and 12th grades in public middle and high schools in Maryland. In Anne Arundel students responded. The increases didn't surprise local teen- who said that if students want to smoke or experiment with not much is going to stop them An 18-year-old Annapolis High School se- who refused to be was smok- ing in the parking lot before school this morning. He said he knows it's unhealthy but doesn't want to quit. just enjoy said the who began the habit at age 12. doesn't really affect Pot smoking is common among many stu- he said. The increase in drug use isn't unique to Ms. Grasmick said. Recent national studies have rises in the use of marijuana and other drugs among teen-agers The results worry local who said their educational efforts are strong but that parents must assume more responsibility. Page Chart mutts of 1994 MIT- vey. A16 SRA critical of new crab regs By MARY ELLEN LLOYD Staff Writer It's not just watermen who are livid about Maryland's new crabbing restric- tions Even some conservationists don't like the Department of Natural Re- sources' new meant to protect the Chesapeake Bay crustaceans from a population collapse The president and several members of the Severn River Association the county's largest civic organization and a conservator of the river criticized the regulations last night are perhaps the most poorly conceived regulations I've ever seen the Department of Natural Resources come up President Steve Carr said at a regular meeting of the organi- zation a perfect formula for 'You can't said Mr who lives on the Severn River Limiting recreational crabbers who use pots off private piers or chicken necks and string to Fridays through Sundays doesn't make sense if commer- cial crabbers are allowed to crab some- where in the bay or its tributaries any 'day of the he said He and others in the county believe a rational approach would have been simply to ban catching female crabs. Catching pregnant female or sponge is already illegal in Maryland. the new regulations cut between 4V4 and six hours from a waterman's legal crabbing hours Commercial crabbers said the cut would reduce their income by one-third this fall They're banned from crabbing in the main part of the bay south of the Bay Bridge on and in the main stem north of the bridge on Mondays. Commercial crabbing with trotlines in tributaries is allowed north of the bridge on Mondays The DNR estimates the combined Page TIME HEALS ALL WOUNDS' By Bradley Peniston The Cnpttil of the Naval Academy's Claw of 1947 sing their school's alma Song of the Vigorous Youth In Eta at the Naval Academy Monday. They were visiting guests of the U.S. academy's Class of 1947. Japanese classes of '47 unite By BRADLEY PENISTON Staff Writer In heavily accented but hearty retired Lt Gen. Teruo Kamei of the Japanese Self-Defense Force praised the Naval Academy's and midshipmen His a post luncheon mixture of Japanese and American former naval officers and applauded. hearts are filled with deep emotion and it reminds us of when we were 50 years he said Fifty years ago. When he and 2JOOO classmates were training at the Imperial Japanese Naval Academv to fijjht the U S Navy heaLs all said Cmdr Richard Yeatman a former carrier pilot who lives outside today The joint reunion Monday at the Naval Academy's Alumni Hall brought together some 160 former midshipmen from the classes of 1947 at the Japanese and American naval academies. The men share a bond. The war ended just before they were to have graduated and taken up arms against each other. It was the third group visit since the classes started meeting a decade ago. In a group of AmerfcMM visiteeMhe Japanese DOW reopened as an OffK er Candidate School for the Japanese Self-Defense Force Commonly called Eta Jima after its island the imperial academy was founded in 1869 in Tokyo but later moved to the coastal Inland Sea island when its urban site was deemed too distracting to midshipmen It was closed by order of the Allies upon the Japanese surrender in 1945. Many of the former both Japanese and attributed some of their camaraderie to the fact that neither class graduated in time to meet in battle Page Limited time for welfare ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON Congressional R publicans are optimistic that they ce send President Clinton a bill thi imposes the first-ever time limit o welfare despite sharp diffe ences between House and Senate ve sions. With solid support from Democrat the Senate voted 87-12 yesterday t dismantle the federal welfare syster and end the New Deal guarantee t provide a subsistence income for mi lions of single mothers and their chil dren Eleven Democrats and a single Re conservative North Carolmi Sen Lauch voted against thi which Mr Faircloth has calta nothing more than a of Pablum.' Sen Mark didn't vote The House passed its version o welfare reform in in its whirl wind action on the Republican tract With America It picked up onlj a handful of Democratic votes as it alsc agreed to abolish Aid to Families witt Dependent Children. Barbara A. voted in favor of the bnt said in a statement that it was a reluctant vote. i She said it was better than welfare reform at all and that would not support any bill oat ot conference committee that includes the stiffer measures of the House legislation. have serious reservations about many aspects of the bill as it now not the least of which it the ability of states to address the needs of poor children during peri- ods of recession or economic she told her on the Senate floor. said I believe the Page Building state's economy won't be easy INSIDE By DAVE GULLIVER Business Writer Maryland was the front-runner for a 500-employee Starbucks coffee plant this but Pennsylvania got it. The state didn't even have a shot at the IBM and Motorola computer chip factories that Virginia landed And that may be only the beginning. is going to continue to kick us in the pants for a long time unless we change the way we do said Michael Conte. director at the Regional Economic Studies pro- gram at the University of Baltimore. He and four other economists yester- flay assessed the state's economy and policies in the first of a series of hearings in Annapolis before the Joint Committee on Economic Development tMantivw. ww. Pnrla H. Glendenint and Gen- ant A ji illj ludera the panel of top legislators to figure out how to build the state economy. They found out quickly how difficult their fob will be is going to continue to kick us in the pants for a long time unless we change the way we do Michael University of Baltimore sion This the University of Mary- land economics chairman predicted very difficult environment for the next two to three Employment will grow only 1 to down from the 1ft percent he predicted earlier this he said. Wages will grow only IK percent do not forecast a but there is not an he said. Banks and utilities have cut back while keatt Mhrta are hatf taptaijwn. Ttetteral m Md eff Thi college and business economists said t he state economy is barely grow- fiore people will lose their and tther states are better at hiring businesses And they disagreed on whether a tax cut it the answer the income tax has to be No. I on the sstd Mahlon Strua- heinV who bucked state offlciab and comedy forecast the 1MO P J residents in the past and Mr Straszheim expects layoffs over five years. Private companies and the govern- ment are adopting as a way of he said. is immune to the process Maryland faces intense competition for its fastest-growing in- business services such as ac- counting and consulting Maryland stands to lose more and more of those battles unless- it changes Arundel Report. Ask a Vet Calendar Lottery V Campus News Cap Camera Chefs ChoW Ctessffled Comes 615 02 Obituaries.. Pokce 81 AM A0. AH Cl-4 Crossword Death Notices Oof's World. A13 the the way it attracts Mr Conte missing tortoise has been found. M Portions of The are printed each day on recycled paper. The newspaper HM Is recyclable. From Keot 327.1893 AM OflMf said He examined three controversial economic development deals. Starbucks built its plant in York where It received a 113 of lotas and KENT MUNOc Wider mosquito spray- Ing is urged. Alt Ordnance removal to ir.-A is ;

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

Issue Date: September 20, 1995

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