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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: August 23, 1995 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - August 23, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland                               School bus schedules Inside today ORIOLES WIN Mussina leading American League with 14 wins Cl On O'sat Soil p.m. onHTS. Cooks who go by the book are in PAGE A1B WEDNESDAY AUGUST MD State cuts imperil school autonomy ByTODDSPANGLER Staff Writer As Gov. Parris N. Glendening warns local officials to expect federal budget county educators fear their fiscal authority could be undermined. Members of the county Board of Education and other officials said this week that an increasingly tight finan- cial picture could boost county leaders in their fight for more power over the yearly education budget. Mr. Glendening told county officials from across Maryland last week that his staff will meet with them in the fall to discuss how best to handle smaller- than-expected local aid payments. He said local the bulk of which goes to will grow by a smaller amount than in the past. The reason is federal cuts that will cost the state jobs and includ- ing million in education he told the Maryland Association of Coun- ties in Ocean City on Saturday. is real Mr Glendening said. we will all feel It's not surprising that Mr. Glenden- former Prince George's County would include local officials in discussions of how to cut growth. But a deal between governments might exclude school board members. Darren a staff attorney for county school Superintendent Carol S. said he expects local officials to lobby for an exchange with the less but more control over it. the county executive can't control school funds within broad sections of the such as instruc- but such power may be what local officials want. county leaders are going to want the state to relax the nance of requirement forcing them to put as much into education each year as in the previous year County Executive John G. Gary has already said he supports such a change is not something that sits well with Mr. Burns said. they 'Cut we've shrunk the administration down to just about the bare Education funds will continue to grow each year by about 4 instead of the 6 percent that has been common in recent said Fred the governor's deputy chief of staff. Local leaders are going to have to pick their priorities. can't be all things to every- said school board member Tho- mas E. Florestano. glory days are and you're going to have to live with what you Mr. Florestano said the school board will have no choice but to find ways to cut back. The smaller growth in the Page It only hurts for a minute School days mean a round of shots By LESLIE GROSS Staff Writer A few days before school a small boy ready to start kindergarten paces back and forth in front of a closed door at a health clinic. He stops and quickly covers his. ears when piercing screams echo from the small room where his cousin is going through a 'dreaded back-to- school immunization. cried 4-year-old Mor- gan who was also getting her Shots at a clinic at Southern Middle School yesterday. Morgan's mother brought the dressed only in a brightly flowered bathing straight from the swim- ming pool 'It feels like a bee she between long wails. Like other area students will have to grin and bear the Because vaccine shots are required to start school on Monday. Students must have a series of shots to enter kindergarten. In die Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene expanded the vaccine adding a sec- ond dose of measles and the mumps shots. Each year the additional shots liave been phased in by .requiring them in an extra grade level The county Department of Health and the Board of Education are hold- ing free clinics this week for students update their immunizations by Monday's deadline. Before school nurses will give shots to about 200 said Wendy coordinator of immu- nization services for the Health De- partment Students need five different vac- cines in various dosages to enter flyJ.Hwwon-TlwCapkBl NIHM SUUMM Pudnufk of Dwideonvtito Mknlntotera a vMdtM to NteholM Sr who's follkif MHIW physical ma mantel woport ftwn Richard RMkhodoff of county upditod bnmunterton words by fltt lint of eehool on Monday. including the teta- nus and pertussis vaccine oral polio vaccine and shots for rubella and mumps. Unlike last students in third and ninth grade are now required to have a second dose of measles vac- cine. Vaccinations are the best way to protect against these dis- REQUIRED VACCINES If students don't have their shots on the first day of they're given a 20-day grace period only if they have an appointment to get the immunizations Ms. Mahan said. Compliance rates are -very high each said Barry spokes- man for the Center for i at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. State- Page The following are the minimum vaccine dosages required for children enrolling In schools in Maryland for the 1995-96 academic which starts Monday. doses diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis three doses oral polio one dose one dose one dose mumps. Children under 59 months must have had one dose haemophilus influenza b given after age 1. Kindergarten through third grade One additional dose measles. In second only three doses of DP are required for children under age 7. Fourth and fifth grade New students must meet all immunization except mumps and measles. Only one dose of measles vaccine is no mumps vaccination is necessary this year. Sixth through ninth grade Two doses of measles and one dose of -mumps are required. New students must meet all other immunization requirements. Grades 10 through 12 Only one dose of measles is required for new students. No mumps vaccination is needed this year. New students must meet all other immunization requirements. State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Severna Park girl is killed in jet ski crash JOHNKEDLMAN StaffWriter A 13-year-old Severna Park girl was killed yesterday afternoon when she was run over by a jet ski in a Queen Anne's County creek. Roxanne M. Bedell was the third person to die in ajet .sjprascjdegt in- Maryland this year.. Her death .has NjJjjiral Resources Police to consider TncreSs- ing patrols in Kent Island's waters. Miss Bedell was riding double with a friend on a jet ski in Jackson Creek near Grasonville when both fell into the water. A second jet ski driven by another friend then hit Miss police spokesman Nancy Howard said. Miss Bedell was pronounced dead at the scene with head and chest Ms. Howard said. About five or six all friends age 12 or were riding in the creek when the accident occurred around 3 Ms. Howard said. Under state jet ski operators' must be at least 14 years old. The law also requires to keep 100 or more feet away from boats or other jet skis. The adult brother of one of the children had brought them to the creek and was watching from the said Sgt Morris a Natural Resources Police supervisor. No charges have been filed against the although that could happen following the Sgt. Jones said. An adult watching over minors can be considered responsible for acci- dents. Police confiscated the two jet skis involved and will examine them in the next day or Sgt. Jones said. Investigators want to know if mechani- cal problems contributed to the acci- dent. Severna Park girl killed in jet ski accident Capital graphic Miss but the watercraft are capable of speeds 60 he said. After the first two fatal this Natural Resources Police' added the Ocean City where jet skis are most Howard said. Now they'll increase patrols antf perhaps the number of officers Kent she said. officers currently assigned be beefing up their efforts in patrols areas where there are many jet Sgt. Jones said. may be putting people to look exclusively. We will officers on boat ramps to tell the of the laws. We will work with to make sure they're knowledgeable the rules. Jones didn't know how fast the very much concerned second jet ski was going when it hit the safety of these Get he said. Veterans receive their stolen medals INSIDE By BRADLEY PEN1STON StaffWriter As investigators continue to sift through boxes of medals found at Stephen V. Pyne's Westminster authorities now believe the alleged con artist stole decorations and military paraphernalia from at least 30 and as many as 38 veterans over the past few years. The alleged victims live in Mary- Pennsylvania and and include four local .retired Navy said David Cor- an investigator with .the county State's Attorney's Office. No trial date has been set for Mr. who faces three charges of felony theft in Circuit Court. More state and federal charges may be brought in other in- eluding Carroll and Montgomery coun- ties and the city of Mr. Cordle said. The FBI is also investigat- ing the he said. Rear Adm. Eugene B. of received his recovered med- als from the State's Attorney's Office earlier this month. very happy to get them Adm. Fluckey said. A1935 Naval Academy graduate who commanded the USS Barb in World War the retired admiral won many of the country's highest including the Congressional Medal of four Navy two Legions of Merit and two Distinguished Service Crosses. Retired Rear Adm. Davjd B. Bell of Annapolis recovered a Navy uniform allegedly stolen by Mr. said Janet the admiral's wife. Medals belonging to retired Rear Adm. Maurice H. Rindskopf of Severna Park and retired Navy Capt. Joseph Taussig Jr. of Annapolis are being held as Mr. Cordle said. Mr. Pyne allegedly used a wide range of different tactics to steal medals and memorabilia. With Adm. Mr. Pyne built a display case for the then allegedly delivered the case with fake medals inside. Page AMUNDEL Court ruling won't change paramedic staff. Dl KENT Sports facilities taken out of the The Capital plan. A10 WEST 134 drums of waste oil removed from construction site. At Congressman is convicted in sex case. A2 Gllchrest Is emerging as OOP's leader. A4 China may Wu spy case before conference. A2 Editorials........... A14 Entertainment..... B7 Lottery................ A4 Kent Island....... A10 Movies................ 87 Obituaries...........A15 Police Beat..........BIO Sports................Cl-6 Television..........811 fides..................A15 West County........ A8 ArurxJel Report..... Dl Ask a Vet.............B12 Calendar............ 89 Campus News...... AS Cap Camera........ B6 Chefs Choice......Bl-5 02 Comics................ B8 Crossword...........Oil Deatti C6 Dog's Orioles to honor Gehrig On-field seating to raise to fight disease ASSOCIATED PRESS BALTIMORE Lou Gehrig died from a degenerative disease two years after establishing the record of consecutive games played in a 15-year career with the New York Yankees. The battle against that disease won't be forgotten on the night Cal Ripken breaks the Hall of Famer's record. The Baltimore in honor of Ripken's consecutive plan to raise million by selling seats on the edge of the playing field Sept 6. The money will be used to set up a foundation at Johns Hopkins Univer- sity for research on neuromuscular including amyotrophk lat- eral commonly called Lou Gehrtg'i disease. ironic but very APtttaphoto enray tear at on Jtfy WM CUI Joe Orioles vice chairman of business and said yesterday at a conference on the field at Camden Tfi our hope that this foundation will be a springboard for finding a The 260 seats will be set up that night hi rows of two against the box seat railing near first and third bases. They will sell for each. So about SO of the seats have been Mr. Foss said. The Orioles got permission from the American League to put the seats on the edge of the field for the game against the California Angels. Gehrig died In 1941 of the degener- ative disease that slowly dettroyed his spine and nerve cells. ALS strikes the spine and nerve cells in the brain and eventually leaves a person said Dr. Ralph a professor of neurol- ogy at Hopkins. The disease's vic- tims usually live three to five yean after being diagnosed and die when muscles in their lungs stop working. amazing is how selective it Dr. Kuncl said. if a person like Lou Gehrig wai unable to nove a his   

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