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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: May 2, 1995 - Page 1

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - May 2, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland                               Accusations flying over pitching B2 FAST FOOD 'Express' has new meaning at pizza competition A5 Two arrested in Oklahoma bombing Bl TOMORROW. SOME SUN DETAILS PAGE All TUESDAY MAY MD 350 Gary proposes hike in aides' pay scales ByBARTJANSEN Staff Writer In a budget year in which rank-and- file county workers are not getting cost-of-living Executive John G. Gary Jr. has proposed increas- ing the salary ceilings for his six top aides more than each Mr Gary denied last week that the officials were getting raises as part of his budget. But a bill he introduced yesterday would boost the pay scales for the officials whose current salaries have peaked makes them eligible for raises in Charity may cause hospital bill hike By MARY ELLEN LLOVD Staff Writer Patients at both hospitals in Anne Arundel County could see higher bills under a plan to help pay for charity cases at urban hospitals. How much rates would increase at Anne Arundel Medical Center and North Arundel Hospital is officials said. A Supreme Court ruling last week paved the way for Maryland's hospital rate-setting agency to jevamp how cnarity care and bad debt are financed. Some Marylanders are unin- sured. Their hospital care now is funded by increasing the rates of pay- ing patients at each hospital to cover that facility's charity expenses. Maryland hospitals mostly urban medical centers last year provided a combined million in free care. AAMC and North Arundel combined to provide more than million in un- reimbursed care annually. For every dollar AAMC about cents go to cover chanty care arid bad while North Arundel uses almost 9 based on recent commission statistics. The state average last year was closer to 8 cents on the said Robert executive director of Maryland's Health Services Cost Re- view Commission At more extreme ends of the Liberty Medical Center in Baltimore uses 15 percent of its revenue to cover charity cases and bad while Saint Joseph's Hospital in Towson uses about 3 he said. Urban hospitals complained that their naturally high load of charity cases and the resulting charges put them at a disadvantage in competition with suburban centers. Under a 1992 task force recommenda- hospitals in each of three regions would all pay for charity care in the region by charging paying patients more. Anne Arundel County would be in Page Salary ceiling could be increased by the Mr. Gary said this morn- ing. thought I answered the question correctly The officials who will be eligible for the raises include1 Finance Officer John R. Ham- whose top salary of could grow to under the bill. Chief of Staff Kenneth H whose pay now tops out at could increase to County Attorney Phillip F Scheibe's pay could rise from to Human Services Officer Ardath from to Land Use and Environment Offi- cer Thomas C. to Director of Aging Carol R. to The Personnel Department reported in October that Mr. Andrews was already earning the salary proposed in the bill County officials could offer no explanation for the discrepancy this morning. All but Mr Scheibe have reached the top of the salary ladder in the current pay structure. But under Mr. Gary's proposal they would be eligible for raises at their next annual review during fiscal 1996 In an interview with The Capital Gary acknowledged that Mr Rumsey would be reclassified He said today that the raise was part of the agreement negotiated for Mr. Rumsey to leave his state job in the Department of Human Resources they like it or not. every county executive has to reorga- nize his management Mr. GaYy said Diane Hutchms. Mr Gary's legisla- tive said the goal is to recog- nize the breadth and level of experi- ence of the top officials. understanding is that is to compensate them equally at the appro- priate she said. The county executive's office is the subject of council hearings this after- noon as part of Mr. Gary's million budget for the fiscal year beginning Julyl Page By J. Henson The Capital Natural Resources Police Cpl. Lisa Nyland sits with her who Is being to find drowning on a rescue boat along the Kent Narrows. Cpl. Nyland raised money tor Jessie's schooling by collecting donations from Kent Narrows businesses. Working-class dog DNR's water search team gets another member By LESLIE GROSS Kent Island Staff Writer When two fishermen drowned in the Chester River in November it took five months to find one of their bodies. The lengthy search was agony for the victim's and one Natural Resources Police officer wants to shorten the process in the future. The search took so long because the Department of Natural Resources the primary state agency responsible for search and drowning vjptims not mnrs its own watw search dog and must borrow from other agencies iftttnd out of state. Cpl. Lisa worked on the Chester River has raised to train her Labrador retriever in water searches so the DNR can have its own dig. hard on the relatives. It's hard on all of us... when it takes that said Cpl. who patrols Kent and Queen Anne's counties and lives in Caroline County. we had our own there would be more opportunity to Such search dogs can find drowning victims underwater by sitting on the bow of a boat and using their sense of smell. Since state funds were Cpl. Nyland collected donations from the businesses along with Kent where she has been stationed for nine years. The businesses donated enough to pay for the training that Cpl. Nyland and her are attending. By the end of the seven-day Jesse will be ready to work across the state as the DNR's first water-search dog. The held at Prince William Forest Park in is run by East Coast Canine Search and Rescue. When the DNR borrows dogs from outside rescue teams from those groups volunteer time to Page Eating disorders to be studied in midshipmen By BRADLEY PENISTON Staff Writer Concerned after two female midship- men resigned last semester because of eating the Naval Academy will survey the eating habits of the -entire Brigade of officials announced yesterday. know we have a problem here and we don't know the size of Capt. Randy commandant of midship- said at the quarterly meeting of the academy's Board of Visitors. The an academy oversight group that reports annually to the also was told the school will start an ethics class for sophomores in the fall of 1996. And academy officials announced they are considering reduc- ing mids' summer training regimen. Because midshipmen can be expelled for having a habitual or persistent eating mids may choose not to discuss such problems with peers or Capt Bogle told the board. The 91-question adminis- tered has been used in many institutions to track prevalence of eating academy psychol- ogy professor Elizabeth K. Holmes said. In a synopsis of the Ms. Holmes said that among college ath- 18 percent of women and 5 percent of men experience disordered eating. One percent to 3 percent of each group have bulimia nervosa or anorex- ia the synopsis said. A person with bulimia may induce vomiting to avoid gaining while a person with anorexia eats very little and may become physically ill from malnutrition. Academy officials are considering changing the conduct rules about eat- ing disorders and hiring a female psychologist to counsel Capt Bogle said Information about eating disorders also will be made available through new midshipmen representatives for the counseling he said midshipmen will see that we're serious and honest about our Capt Bogle said. can't solve the problem unless you identify He said officials from other service academies denied eating disorders were a problem at their institutions. Naval Academy officials became con- cerned after two female mids resigned from the academy last semester to enter inpatient treatment for eating Capt. Bogle said. In other comments to the academy superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson defended the school against media reports that the academy is an inefficient way to produce officers. you look at the officers who are still in the Navy 10 to 20 years you'll find that for every dollar you spent putting someone through the Naval you'll have spent a dollar and a half on ROTC and more than three dollars on Candi- date he said. Academy Dean Robert H. Shapiro told the board that the new ethics part of the school's character develop- ment would be taught to a pilot group of 120 sophomore midship- men this fall and the rest of the class next spring. In fall of the entire new sophomore class will take the two- semester he said. Two new professors are being hired to teach this course and other ethics Mr. Shapiro said. One will be a standard military officer while the other may be an endowed civilian he said. The ethics class will replace a man- agement training he said. Reduced Also the board was Academy officials are considering lightening midshipmen's summer training which include leadership training and cruises. found that it was possible for a mid who wasn't doing well academi- cally and had to take summer courses to never get summer leave or elec- Capt. Bogle said. The academy firehouse would be replaced in mid-1996 with a structure twice as big. Construction costs are estimated at million INSIDE ARUNDEL The County Council last night agreed to use a regional composting facility in Howard County as a place to haul residents' grass clippings and leaves The 6-1 vote followed hours of pointed debate about the costs and obligations of a 20-year agreement. Bl The Crotton tax district will be able to provide 24-hour police protec- tion to residents as a result of a federal grant presented last week by a congressman. A9 More than some of the major league baseball players say. they want to get their season and their game back to normal the season will take a major step toward normalcy when the regular umpires replace their counter parts at major league stadiums across the country. B2 Rep Constance A Morella has voted against the Contract with more times than any other House GOP making her the Republican least loyal to the party s agenda In the 15 votes on items included in the GOP document in the first 100 days of the 104th Mrs. Morella voted against the contract seven times. 2 26 Cruze appointed to Capital posts Arundel Report Business Calendar. Classified Club Notes Comics Crofton Crossword Death Notices Bl Editorials A5-6 Lottery B14 Movies.. B8 Obituaries B7 Police Beat AS Sevema Park A9 Sports B13 Television B13 Tides AID A4 B6 All All A7 B2-5 B7 All Portions of The Capital are printed each day on recycled paper The newspaper also is recyclable Classified.................268-7000 Circulation..................268-4800 From Kent 327-1583 All other departments..268-5000 Berme Hoff was named advertising director of all Capital-Gazette Newspa- pers today by Philip publisher The announcement formalizes an ar- rangement that has been in effect for some time. Mr. Hoff takes over the top sales position from George the com- pany's business who will continue to work on special run the Capital-Gazette Foundation and analyze investment opportunities. A native of Mr. is a graduate of the University of Baltimore with a marketing degree Before joining Capital-Gazette News- where he has worked for 20 he worked in the marketing department at Maryland Cup Corp in Baltimore Mr HofT is vice president of business development for the Greater Annapolis Chamber of Commerce and is a mem ber of the Annapolis Lions Club He lues with his on Williams Drive in Annapolis Mr. Merrill said he was to BERNIE HOFF advertising director be able to promote such excellent management talent I have complete confidence in Bernie Hoffs ability to handle the company's advertising which are about four-fifths of a GEORGE CRUZE special projects newspaper's Mr Merrill said Mr Cruze has been the company's senior business official since 1969 He lives with on Romar Drive in Annapolis. Mr Merrill have learned more from George Cruze about busi- ness than from any other single including the Harvard Business School He is ana- a natural problem-solver and a master at sales and marketing The Capital-Gazette offices are lo- cated at 2000 Capital Drive in Annapo- just north of the 2000 block of West Street Besides The the com- pany publishes the Maryland the Bowie the Crofton the West County News and the Washingtonian magazine in Wash- D C The the country's oldest newspaper publisher has been in busi- ness in Annapolis since 1727 Its flag- ship newspaper The serves nine out of 10 homes in the area The total circulation of all of the company's publications is approxi- mately The company has of- fices in Glen Bowie and Wash- ington in addition to Annapolis   

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