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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: February 20, 1995 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - February 20, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland                               Baltimore man gave to OCTO ARCHIVES 312 LAUREL AVE LAUREL MD 20707 TERPS' UM survives close call against Cincinnati Smith Momovw Qndmitl's Arthur Long In Double murder trial set to open Sn ARUNDIL REPORT PAGE A7 MONDAY FEBRUARY 20. 1995. ANNAPOLIS. MD HOMt 250 NEWSSTAND More funds for shift JBifc Staff Writer Anne Arundei County legislators are being asked to support a change in the way Maryland doles out highway funds a change that would drain money from Baltimore city and give- it to growing suburban counties. Ben a lobbyist for Montgom- ery went before the county's state on Friday looking to win backing for a measure that would increase Anne Arundel's share of the funding by million next year. The change -being Moa- tgomery County the state's largest and wealthiest jurisdiction is aimed at taking a portion of the money Baltimore receives under the formula for highway user revenue distribution. Baltimore gets about half the million in user even though it has only about 8 percent of the locally maintained road mileage in the state and about vehicle registrations. Anne Arundei County has vehicle regisfriiiohs and almost much mileage as Baltimore. Under the current Balti- more will receive million in high- way user revenue next Anne Arundei will get less than million. not saying there should be some kind of special treatment for Baltimore said Mr. recog- nizing the political difficulties of drain- ing transportation funding away from the second-largest jurisdiction in Mary- land. for all of us. it was a miniscule amount The Montgomery County proposal would still allow the city to get most of the funds and use them for mainte- nance and other transportation needs. But it would shift the formula to more closely address problems growing counties are experiencing. The Anne Arundei legislators ap- peared split over the plan. Del. Marsha G. Perry. D-Crofton. complained that even though Balti- more has fallen on hard the state can't afford to ignore its basic needs She also said many people in Anne Page Family court Wave of the By BRIAN WHEELER Staff Writer It's a simple really. Take two let them slug it out and a judge will declare who's the winner That adversarial system works well in most court cases. at about eases thm hinge on subject about cases that are bound to return year after How do vou decide whether someone is fit to be a Those are questions that trouble people like Circuit Court Judge James C Cawood Jr As the judge who hears most divorce and custody cases in Anne Arundei he wonders whether the traditional court system does justice to families. place people a and ask them if they're a good parent by putting them on the stand that's not going to Judge Cawood said. But that approach may be becoming a thing of the past. The system of handling family cases in Anne Arundei County is iri the midstjrf a massive upheaval Jhat may change DC settled. Since last the changes have been dramatic. Families have been prodded to resolve cases out of court Groups sticti as the comity Bar Association have started programs to explain legal concepts to litigants. And judges have revamped hearing schedules to prevent cases from languishing. looking at how destructive courts have been in the said Martin Kranitz. a court-appointed mediator who meets with people before their cases go to trial there's ROTARY BENEFIT By Mark M. Oifetl Capaal Stacey Irwin of Annapolis poses with the ticket canister early In the evening at Club's annual Rotary 3OO fundraiser held Saturday at the Loews Annapolis Hotel. Three winners shared Hie top prtn of Ms. representing an anonymous George NassH of an employee of Tfte and John Garrett of manager of the P.T. Moran Store In AnnapoHs. The winners got to choose among a a Ford Explorer a world travel package or the cash. They chose the which will be shared with several others who helped to buy the winning ticket. eets By police can M. Staff Arundei County mayJw-forceita-pick up tens of thousands of dollars in hospital care for two men shot by county police. w.ere at. the Shock-. Trauma Center at University Hospital in Baltimore after threatening officers with weapons or refusing to drop their weapons. Maryland the county is responsible fdr the cost of pretrial including time spent in a said Gail assis- tant county attorney. expenses can be But Anne Arundei and other Mary- land counties are hoping .to change that. Five years after the state's highest the medical costs of criminal the county is being sued for refusing to pay worth of medical bills for a prisoner treated in 1994. Ms. Watson said the law isn't com- pletely clear on who bears the burden if the prisoner isn't yet in custody. On Jan. Phillip C Mines of Pasadena was taken to University Hos- pital after he was shot by county police outside a Superfresh. store. He stayed. in the hospital until Feb. when he was taken to the county detention center. His hospital bill for the first 10 days was almost S47.000. His bill from Jan. 16 to Feb. 11 was almost And his physicians' bill for the entire peri- od was just over Almost one year Hines was sentenced to four years in prison for armed robbery on Jan. Ms. Watson said the tab should go to the state because Hines wasn't in custody when he was shot and hadn't been charged. No court date has been set for the lawsuit. Ms. Watson said. go through the process to eval- uate the The two recent cases are similar On Jan. Lynn L. Gladden. 28. of 'Brooklyn Park was shot by county police. He's suspected in a series of arme4 robberies at automated teller machines. Mr. Gladden was shot once after allegedly robbing an undercover offi- then refusing to drop his weapon stopped by uniformed officers Five years after the ruled that are liable for the medical' costs of criminal the county is' being sued for refusing to pay worth of medical bill's for a prisoner treated in 1994. The bullet severed his spinal umn. The result may be that he's waist dowrrforthe- rest of his life. Constantine of Pasade- was shot Feb. 3 following a domes- tic argument. He allegedly slashed his wife with a then threatened police officers. He was shot in the leg and and spent several days in hospital before being released to the county detention If neither man is insured and neither has any assets that can be taken by the both tabs will go to the county. the bill off at the expense of sending it to taxpayers is the last said Chuck spokes- man for the Shock-Trauma More than one county has asked the which owns the to pick up the tab through its Medical Assistance Program. In Harford County refused to pay for three weeks of medical care for a rape suspect shot by sheriffs depu- ties. The dispute with University Hos- pital and the state went to the state Court of where Harford lost eventually had to pay the 8-10.000 In Attorney General Joseph Curran affirmed that the state's policy of excluding county detention center inmates or any suspects in county custody from medical assistance is authorized under federal and state law. Ms. Watson' said the county regu- larly seeks a judgment against deten- tion center inmates for medical costs. Page 'Global warming' may have resulted from natural cycle INSIDE By George N Lundskow The Capital Circuit Court Judge James Cawood who hears most of the county's divorce-related Is a strong booster-of proposals. a move to preserve the family integrity even during the most traumatic of such as separation and divorce The changes are part of a trend that some hope will lead to a a separate judicial system much like the The move toward a family court has stemmed from a gradual shift in domestic cases away from the traditional adversarial courtroom relationship Instead. Judge Cawood and others have worked to bolster programs outside the courtroom. they've seen an explosion of those Since from the county Bar Association have spent three days a week at the courthouse trying to Pane ASSOCIATED PRESS ATLANTA Those balmy winters of the late which some called a harbinger of global may ac- tually have resulted from a natural weather cycle that occurs about every t rpggarr.hijrs yesterday. the question How do you separate the ordinary vagaries of nature from the ones imposed by man kind1 want to really understand the natural events so you can understand the effects of human such as increasing levels of carbon dioxide In the said Craig Lmdberg. a climate researcher at Princeton Uni versity How a variety of forces including people may affect the weather was He found an irregular climate cycle that occurs every 16 to 18 years This cycle in influence the vari- ability of El the blocks of warm Pacific water that profoundly affect weather worldwide. u Lhp first limp tbal meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science The study that looked at the 1980s warm when temperatures rose abruptly to record-setting was presented by Jeffrey Park of Yale University. He analyzed 100 years of temperature and air pressure data to look for learning patterns of unusual highs and lows. seen a correlation of El Nino activity at these Mr Park said. The most recent high point in this cycle occurred in the late 1980s Mr Park believes this 18-year as well as other patterns that follow longer and shorter time can explain much of the variability of weather seen over the past century- Mr Lindberg said that although this newly identified cycle may explain some of the recent he be heves that manmade forces also are playing a role Long-term weather records suggest that the forth has warmed slightly during this century Whether or not people are to blame is a matter of great debate Many believe that burning coal and oil are flooding the atmosphere with carbon dioxide and other gases that act ARUNDEL Space at the county's animal shelter in Glen Burnie is so cramped that unfamiliar and some times hostile dogs are often bunked together. Bl. Although the county school board has approved the first chunk of money for full renovation and expansion of Broadneck High officials still are considering a scaled- back plan. Cl. The Navy women's basket ball coach yanked his starting players from their last Patriot League game against Fordham yesterday and sent in a TW a 63-52 victory. Dl. 4 21 4rjnde' Report Calendar... Capital Camera Classified.. Comics.. Editorials Bl Cl Lcnprv 83 84 Obituaries C2 Ponce Be ai D6 C7 Televise1- 46 Weddings Bi A4 86 A 7 A7 ...Dl-5 85 82 Portions of TV Caoital are printed each day on recycled oaoer also is recyclable. From Kent 327-1583 AM otfwr 266-SOOO   

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