Annapolis Capital, February 14, 1995

Annapolis Capital

February 14, 1995

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Tuesday, February 14, 1995

Pages available: 32

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Annapolis CapitalAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

Pages available: 604,938

Years available: 1887 - 2009

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.05+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Annapolis Capital, February 14, 1995

All text in the Annapolis Capital February 14, 1995, Page 1.

Capital, The (Newspaper) - February 14, 1995, Annapolis, Maryland Answers to your most taxing CRIME MONEY House nearing vote on block grant bill for crime A2 Tyson will be set free early OCTO ARCHIVES LAUREL AVE LAUREL MB Capitol SLEET PAGE A9 TUESDAY FEBRUARY ANNAPOLIS. MD loves to teach and think. I also love to but I also love There are different ways our loves manifest LtGov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend During a braak from their hectic Lt. Oov. KstMssn Kennedy Towmend and her DaVM share chocolate nrilk shake yesterday at the St. John's CoHefe coffee shop. The who began dating after a rafting trip down the Mississippi have four daughters. Mr. Townsend Is a longtime Instructor at the Annapolis school. The Townsends' everlasting love By THERESA W1NSLOW Staff Writer She was a Harvard undergraduate. He was a graduate student and her teacher. She was interested in but there were two Teacher-student relationships were frowned and he already had a girlfriend. Then she got an idea. They had read Mark Twain in their so when the semester she suggested a rafting trip They spent 10 days building the and 20 days floating down the Mississippi After they dated for about a year and then got married Twenty-one years and four daughters David Townsend and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend are still but their careers have led them down different paths Mr Townsend is a longtime instructor at St John's College in Annapolis. Mrs. Townsend is the lieutenant governor of Maryland Their offices are a study in contrasts one cluttered and the other ornate and official Yet they offer the First clue as to what keeps tiua-couple their children. Both offices feature the girls' art although the way it's displayed reflects the difference in settings Mr. Townsend has crayon sketches fastened to the wall Mrs Townsend has framed paintings and a model of the Parthenon built by their second- Much of on the weflftnds is spent attending their daughters' school activities such as basketball games and plays On the household work typically falls to Townsend since his schedule is a little less hectic They live in Baltimore do a lot of the nuts and like he said Asked to name his he smiled and rattled off the names of his daughters. and 3 Other common interests include hiking and reading His favorite subjects are poetry and while she favors history loves to teach and she said also love to but I also love politics There are different ways our loves manifest Page HOME 25C 33C Law tough on clubs thai discriminate By JEFF NELSON .Staff Writer Any Annapolis' private club that excludes members based on gender or race may have to leave town or face loss of its liquor license. The City Council last night unani- mously adopted a historic anti- discrimination law aimed at chasing out clubs that discriminate against minorities and women. The which into effect allows anyone who feels they have been discriminated against by a club to ask the city Alcoholic Beverage Control Board to take away is the most important piece of civil rights legislation passed in this city since 1965 equal housing opportunity laws were said Alderman Carl 0 D-Ward 5 Alderman Terrie R-Ward said she did not support an earlier measure that took away liquor licenses from clubs whose bylaws discrimi- nated based on race or gender she said she wrote the latest till to extend the law all clubs that discriminate in practice as well as in their bylaws. Ms. DeGraff said she tried to get an application at one city club last year and was told women could not join The chib which she declined to identify was protected from losing its license to serve alcohol because its bylaws did not prohibit female mem- although in practice it dis- criminated against women The bill worried at least one alder- who was afraid the city would begin counting minorities and women club members on rosters hope we don't ge' into a quota said Alderman Dean I Ward 2 Twelve clubs in the city hold liquor licenses and could potentially be af fee ted There have been complaints in the past about the membership policies of the Eastport Democratic Club and the Annapolitan according to Mr Snowden In addition to those two organiza other clubs in the city that hold liquor licenses include' American Le- gion Post Ancient City Lodge No Page City aldermen salary cuts rejected By JEFF NELSON Staff Writer The City Council last night rejected a salary review com- mission's rftroui cut the pay for aldermen and the mayor. The commission had recom- mended a cut in alder- men's annual salaries. It also recommended the may- or's salary be slashed from per year to had no said Alderman Carl 0. the council asked Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins to appoint a new salary committee to study the Issue. The old panel determined that Mr. Hopkins is the second- highest paid mayor in the state. Salary review commissions are created between and their recommendations can only be cut or rejected. The rejection of the commis- sion's recommendations came when the measure was first when no alderman can make a motion to table the resolution for hearings or de- bate The commission had come under fire from aldermen for holding some of its meetings in secret and probing the relation ship between the council and the mayor Any changes to the salaries for aldermen and the mayor must be recommended by a salary commission and can only go into effect after a general election. Ethics law frightens county volunteers By BART JANSEN Staff Writer An expanded county ethics law is scaring off members of volunteer boards who mistakenly fear they will have to reveal incomes or financial holdings officials said yesterday -----------.lamps .1 pxecuttuc director of All but one member of the mechanical and plumbing boards quit rather than face the new disclosure he said The boards are important for over seeing licensing tests for construction said Mr Gary a former con trqrtnr with cigmfirjant Hoc tn the Ethics Commission said the prob- lem is easily remedied because it stems from confusion about the law which doesn't require detailed financial dis closure don't ask for financial informa tion at he said County Executive John G Gary Jr said the problem has become severe as he tries to fill 831 appointments in his new administration building community up against a crunch he said of the pending licensing tests is having a chilling effect The County Council voted last year to expand who is covered by ethics reports. Members of several major such toe Board of Appeals and the Planning Advisory must file detailed reports that include Page 'Forrest the good hit about a simpleton who tn umons m the end received 13 Academy nominations today A3 Arundel Reoort Calendar Club Notes COTHCS Crofter Crossword Cl B13 A7 C3 86 05 C2 C3 Lottery Movies Sports Tefews Tides A8 44 A9 01-6 65 Ad 288-7000 CffCUMVlOVI. Protesters seek stricter abuse laws By TODD SPANGLER Staff Writer L_y_nn Kennev is only _1Q years but has a tale of domestic violence In tpfT Describing abuse she suffered at the hands of a boyfriend the Glen Bumie woman last night mesmerised a crowd of about 200 people who braved frigid rold for a domestic violence rallv in Annapo hs Ms Kennev who began a relationship with a 17 year-old when she was 15 said that it took a Christmas Eve trip to the hospital before she realized she was being abused She said the fight started because she wanted to attend Mass and her boyfriend nidn t want to go 'I thought it was OK for a boyfriend to hit a when she did sometiung Ms. Kenney said The beating she suffered convinced her to get out of the relationship and call police But Ms Kenney and the rest of the crowd that gathered outside the State House believe that recent gams in domestic violence laws are not and measures are needed to protect battered spouses more thoroughly The memorial service last night was called to remember 91 women and children in the state who died became of spousal abuse in 1994 It was the seventh annual at which members of the Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence vta of Qton tetimsw Bnrafe hoMs s asked lawmakers to pass legislation expanding their nghts House Bill 140 would give police the authority to arrest a person believed to have abased his spouse Currently such arrests are seldom made because the officer has not witnessed the abusive act By Davwl W Troan The SOQ wfirtS' csnvsntofi In Miscnocy of st Lswyscs MJM In The legislation also would create a domestic violence fund to help designed to combat abuse and compel victims to testify against abusm in court 'You re out here tonight because you realize a Page A ;

RealCheck