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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: December 29, 1986 - Page 1

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - December 29, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Away we Mid-winter getaways. see PAGE CQ get a lift from Atkinson. SEE PAGE C1 Your Good and bad news on Retail Ads Business Classifieo Circulation Newsroom t 268-4800 268-5000 r ic Tomorrow's Rain or For see page A7. VOL Cl NO. 306 DECEMBER 25 Cents GOOD DONT FORGET A hop will be held from to tonight at Super Skate on Route 50 with tickets at each sold at the door. The dance is spon- sored by the Severna Park Green Hornets 1972 Girls Se- lect Soccer Team to help fund ti trip to an overseas soccer tournament next summer. AREA COUNTY WORKERS' con- tracts are up for renewal. Page Dl. ACTION LINE THE CAPITAL'S consumer advice column helps a reader withaTVripoff. PageDl. STATE FOUR die in traffic acci- dents over the long holiday weekend. Page A4. IRANIAN AND U.S. officials meet today for the third round of talks on the return of million to Iran. Page A2. NEXT moderate economic growth. Page A3. SAILING STARS STRIPES and New Zealand edged closer to a match-up hi the America's Cup challengers finals. Page Cl. PEOPLE Award-winning mystery writer John D. whose 77 novels included the colorfully titled series about the offbeat prob- lem-solver Travis has died at the age of 70. MacDon- of Sara- died yester- day at St. Mary's Hos-j pital in Mil- waukee ofl complica- tions following heart bypass surgery there in September. In a writing career spanning more than 40 MacDon- ald wrote more than 500 pieces of fiction. Many of his including the McGee included a color in the title More than 30 million copies of the McGee novels have been printed in the United States alone. The author's Maynard said his father had recently been working on a new novel about the detec- tive who was once described as of a knight in slightly tarnished and lived in Florida on a houseboat called that be won in a card eame For a iooK at otber people tn the letptge A3 LOTTERY -a Saturday lie Pick 4 Lotto M 13 INDEX r Edttnru Enterta r 2 Pftlife luttag College debts Loan defaults likely to rise By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON America's col- lege students have become increas- ingly dependent on borrowing to finance their and their growing debt burdens could pose serious repayment ac- cording to a new congressional study. The undertaken for the Joint Economic found evidence of the problems mostly sketchy and but raised the possibility that higher education debts can affect students' career and postpone marriage and even the decision to have children. And it pointed out that as borrow- ing to finance education students have less certainty about their ultimate ability to repay and what a manageable debt burden will be. Undergraduates in particular face uncertainty about what kinds of jobs they will get and how much they will earn and what levels of inflation and salary increases they will face upon the paper pointed out. cumulative debt of college students that is documented in this paper is said committee Rep. David and Sen. Paul Sar- who will take over the post next in a joint statement. Student borrowing to pay .higher education in inflation-adjusted has tripled over the past now amounting to some said the study by Janet S. Hansen of the College Board. While student loans originated as a tool to help the middle they have grown to encompass all income brackets 2nd community colleges and vocational schools as well as colleges and the paper found study does indicate that gov- ernment loan collection problems may grow in the years Obey and Sarbanes in part because of the growth in lending to communi- ty college and proprietary school students who traditionally have had higher default rates because of low- er earnings potential At least and perhaps as many as of all students now leave school in the study stat- ed At the same federal aid has been dramatically cut back and college costs have risen sharply while family income has been stag- nant and upper-middle-mcome American families have lost much and in many cases all of their eligibility to get federally subsidized student and families in the lower and lower-middle income cate- gories are receiving far less ic grant and scholarship assistance than they did 10 years making it neces- sary for them to borrow far more heavily the committee said SAFE NEST Center protects the endangered whooping crane By EFFIE COTTMAN Staff Writer They'll never soar above the Chesapeake but some of -the noisiest birds in the country are quietly pampered near its shores Protected behind locked the endangered whooping crane is staging a comeback at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Cen- ter in Laurel The graceful 5-foot tall named for their distinctive slowly are becoming a success story in wildlife man- said Matthew C Per a biologist at the federal research facility They have rebounded from near extinction in the 1940s into a although still ten- population he said.. Most of the scientific studies ..OB the bird have taken place at tha acre research straddling the Anne Priace Georges county Hire Itw where wild ducks rpitctfinto manmade poods and wander through also is conducting studies on smaller sandhill crSnes birds native to including the endangered bald Beagle and migrating waterfowl Bat 38 whoopers rule the roost. Far from their breeding home in Canada and summer resort along the Gulf of they enjoy an undisturbed existence os road to recovery Few visitors are allowed in side the compound reserved for endangered species research Between Dec 1 and Sept the area is closed to all but select scientists to allow the birds pn vacy for breeding reproduce better when they're not disturbed Perry said during a tour last when he pointed out the birds from a van Solitude also helps recreate the birds natural living condi- tions to keep them as wild as Perry said else doing be said of the research been an experimental program for us It s been contro venial There arc people that say 'leave them in the wild But back tn the late '60s. when the center began rearing L 5 Fxh and Wildlife Service frared the population could not be restored without man's intervention look at it more as a respon Perry said. know we can cause ex- daoe Three subspecies of sandhill cranes worried scientists aad werr targeUd for raptive breeding Wboopine cranes birds black wing tips lived n region of the country But were hunted for meat ana ornamental feath white their marshy northern neatiag grounds were drained fortamfcmd AMONG THE uwtor protection at the Patuxant Center to the Florida Sandhill 'Crisis' bills sought Schools top county's list By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Anne Arundel County government asking state legislators for a package of' Dills aimed at averting insurance crises oefore they happen. lot of the things are said Robert aide to County tive 0. James Lighthizer. an ant patory package. We're trying to 1 care of things before they come But Lighthizer said the centerpiece the county's is money to renovate George Fox Middle School Pasadena. The Board of Education put the middle school renovation at the top of its priori- ty list but the state Interagency tee on School Construction'has only planning money for the school. Board members last month county legislators for help in getting- money for the school. Del. John said chances of construction money for the middle school do not look good at this point. While the school is the big-ticket mon- ey the county's legislative package includes several proposals that would cut he cost of insurance for various groups. One proposal would limit the liability of community associations and allow the associations to pool to get tower insur- ance rates. think this will generate a lot of Astle said. will help a lot of A similar that capped liabili- ty for charitable associations passed the General Assembly last year. The coun- ty's proposal would set the same limits for community associations for individuals and per occurr- ence. Another county propsal would allow charitable organizations to pool in order to get liability insurance. Last lawmakers enacted legis- lation that allows smaller municipalities to pool for insurance purposes Yet another insurance proposal would allow the county to include the communi- ty college in its self-insurance fund. Last year Anne Arundel Community College spent on workers' com- pensation insurance last year But the college's losses are only abut a years The final insurance proposal would eliminate workers' compensation for prisoners in the county Detention Center. The prisoners are paid for work they do on projects for the county. Under current an inmate injured while could claim a permanent partial benefit thnugh workers' compensation compensation wai never intended as a social welfare program for Page Col. Mids get face No. 1 UNLV tonight R t rw a U Pt A 1 t LAS bfltk r f to Tw s f iiR for us There s tin jbt t tiat It ill cprtBinly r effor' tn Mop i fr rirrr-n p-rr IHTMM of ji thf i c-ouefe T h cotton iU TV lonifht in being UNLV Hotidif Oiww tame net up Saturday night when the Mxtohtpmett whipped Ida ho State while Vegti emerged with a 103-13 victory over f V r Si A A 4 -t. -f i t the nation s tup fs- tlvf r i r f if t hfaCr pwtupf Thtt teim 'f future not on thf lice in th MIDS ON TV IS A t A -i r-t. rrowi r S r i k fr 1 C Tfl ir s a l in gel r rto But t ihe fVior The Runnm team agitnit their home court UNLV it tome they are playing introduction rA the home -sn mtrwlwctaoes mort thin the fire nn the mvrt be intimidating The house hghu are We consMer everr fallal They are pitying the arena and the colored spotlights swing but this wBl be the MffesTof crowd aai Reworks are my team f fn about ro jp u irxl that ve J' there agatAM V 'earn be-fnre ind 'hit wfll us in thti know witn t ture that to ptty he wouirt leave on vtrv I 4o think CM the UNI The havt r n m-f   

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