Annapolis Capital, November 12, 1986

Annapolis Capital

November 12, 1986

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Issue date: Wednesday, November 12, 1986

Pages available: 50 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

Pages available: 604,938

Years available: 1887 - 2009

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Capital, The (Newspaper) - November 12, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland THE CAPITAL Wed.. Nov. 3 People IN THE NEWS Surf's up Fla. Jack the a former surfing champion who gained parole after 21 years in is taking up preaching and going on the campus lecture circuit. gained internation- al notoriety with the 1964 heist of the 563-carat Star of India sap- phire from the Museum of Natu- ral History in New York. He was paroled Monday on two life sentences for and said at a news conference yester- day his past was an old movie that we saw years and years ago. It doesn't seem doesn't seem like anybody that I really He said he plans a lay prison will go on the campus lecture circuit at an en- and plans to sell his paintings. He has been living at a work- release halfway house for 23 months. Moneymaker Ga. Sydney Biddle New York's er told about 500 Uni- versity of Georgia students that some of her relatives reacted to her arrest with praise for her business acumen. Ms. on tour to pro- mote her Mayflower The Secret Life of Syd- ney Biddle said her mother was saddened by her arrest but that more distant rela- tives described her the only Biddle in a generation that made Ms. who traces some of her ancestors to the was arrested in 1984 and charged with running an escort service in New York staffed by call girls. She told the students she never JACK MURPHY speaking out was involved in escorting but worked strictly in manage- ment. Job saver N.J. Rock super- star Bruce who sings of troubled working-class America and recently tried to save a factory in his home may have delayed layoffs at a record plant just by releasing a new album. The rush by fans to buy Springsteen's new five-record set of concert performances has prompted stepped-up production at the CBS Records Inc. factory where 300 layoffs have been scheduled for next month. The which made copies of Springsteen the E Street Band Live during the last six got word Monday to crank out said production manager Wally Martin. Columbia a CBS Records distributed 1.5 million copies of Springsteen's live album to record stores na- tionwide Monday. Many stores sold out within hours as fans grabbed up the long-awaited al- bum. Pork pusher Neb. Olympic ice skating champion Peggy Fleming has agreed to endorse pork con- sumption as part of a mil- lion-advertising the National Pork Producers Council said. The campaign is scheduled to begin next year using radio and television advertising in about 15 of the nation's largest said Russ presi- dent of the producers council. Miss who won a gold medal at the 1968 will promote pork by using the coun- cil's new The Other White One-man show NEW YORK PhD going without an audience for one of the few times in his daytime TV took a camera crew into an AIDS ward for his Thurs- day program. patients are not physi- cally capable of coming to the Donahue said yesterday. in go from room to The which Donahue characterized as was taped at the Spellman Center for Persons with estab- lished by the Roman Catholic archdiocese at St. Clare's Hospi- tal Health Center in midtown Manhattan. Donahue does wear a face mask while interviewing one who contracted tuberculosis after AIDS ravaged his immune sys- tem. Number of troubled banks growing daily SAN FRANCISCO The government's list of financially trou- bled banks is growing by one bank a day as the industry continues to be buffeted by bad loans and stiff com- a top federal regulator says. L. William chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance said yesterday his agency is adding a bank daily on average to its watch list of institutions with such weak balance sheets that there is a danger they could fail. There are now institutions on the trouble list about one bank in 10 compared with at the beginning of the year. While typically only about 10 per- cent of the troubled banks Seidman noted that already this year his agency has had to close 123 a post-Depression record. He said he expected the total of failed banks would hit 150 before the year is and he said 1987 would not show any improvement. Seidman said despite these prob- lems the which insures depos- its in is with reserves expected to grow by more The total of failed banks is expected to hit 150 before the year is over. L. William FDIC chairman than million this year to approx- imately billion. Seidman's comments came at the annual convention of the U.S. League of Savings which was winding up a three-day meeting today. By contrast to the health of the the Federal Sayings and Loan Insurance which insures de- posits at has reserves which likely will drop below billion by January. That statement was made yester- day by Edwin chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank which regulates and controls the FSLIC fund. Gray told conven- tion attendees that once the reserves drop to this low a he will have to stop acting on any closure cases. Even hundreds of technically insolvent are being kept open because regulators do not want to exhaust the funds in FSLIC. The league has come out in sup- port of a stop-gap measure which would pump billion into FSLIC next year. Gray said he and the Reagan administra- tion remain committed to the five-year refinancing propos- al that failed to win congressional approval last year. He said the smaller amount would limit the number of troubled with which the agency could deal. He said the broader plan was more Both banks and have been particularly hurt by troubles in the nation's farm and energy sectors and by competition from securities insurance companies and even retailers such as Sears offering services traditionally performed only by financial institutions. Teachers pessimistic on gains NEW YORK Salary gains and other improvements during the past year failed to reduce the num- ber of public school teachers who want to leave the a new survey has found. A majority of teachers said they endorse many of the aims of school but only little more than a third said they think reform has helped according to find- ings released yesterday in the third annual Louis Harris poll of teacher viewpoints. According to the commis- sioned by the Metropolitan Life In- surance 55 percent of the teachers said they have seriously considered quitting the compared with 51 percent in the 1985 survey. The margin of error was plus or minus 5 percentage points. Reforms are not adequate The 1986 poll was the first to include the opinions of teacher union lead- state education state legislators who serve on education and deans of colleges of education. Only 36 percent of teachers felt recent reforms have had a positive impact on but 78 percent of state education officials and 73 per- cent of legislators thought reform had helped teachers. More than 90 percent of teachers and education leaders agree that poor pay is a leading contributor to an impending teacher shortage. And more than 80 percent from all groups surveyed said teachers are doing an or job. survey reinforces the value of teachers in our society and the need to pay them said Mary Hatwood president of the 1.8-million member National Educa- tion the nation's largest teacher union. is highest among those who are closest to the and teacher union and association offi- she said. On reform 72 percent of teachers remained set against merit as did 55 percent of principals. But 73 percent of education college deans favored merit as did slim majorities of legis- lators and state education officials. Teachers were more favorably dis- posed to other types of pay scales created under school reform. fiirorn 0EIHC1E3 DHCtfS Pickup APR FINANCING I I REBATES I 4x4 TUrbo SB5 4x4 7 from to KOONSB TOYOTA 1107 WEST STREET. AMMAPOUS. HP. KOONS TOYOTA i '07 WEST ST IN ANNAPOLIS CALL 268-6480 Hours 9AM 9PM. Open 6 Days a Week ;