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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: July 9, 1986 - Page 1

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - July 9, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               HOWFLL MICROFILMS P 0 BOX i558 LAUREL Newsroom MD 20707 268.5000 Some relief For aaa page 11. VOL Cl NO. 160 JULY 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET EARTH a band specializing in Latin American and African will perform free at 7 tonight at City Dock. Bring chain or blankets for seating. AREA FORMER STATE Sen. Jer- ome Connell is denied early parole. Page 37. CITYSCAPE THE DISCIPLES of Lyndon LaRouche are popping up like summer ragweed. Page 37. KENT ISLAND IT'S MOSQUITO season and people are under attack after sunset. Page 21. DR. GOTT THERE ARE several rea- sons for restlessness in chil- dren. Page IS. FAMILIES SOMETIMES the gravest problem in marriage is a lack of communication. Page 16. CHEF'S CHOICE TERRY PRINCE tells how to enjoy your own party. Page 13. ENTERTAINMENT THE YWCA sponsors a dance-art workshop for chil- dren. Page 34. STATE NO DISCIPLINARY action will be given social workers who handled abuse complaints preceding the death of a young child. Page 4. GASOLINE from a ruptured pipeline flooded a Minnesota street and killing two. Page 2. PRESIDENT REAGAN signed a bill yesterday length- ening daylight-saving time by three weeks. Page 3. SPORTS NAVY CMDR. Rick Murray completes the Liberty-to-Liber- ty Triathlon. Page 25. PEOPLE Hard-boiled detective novel- ist Mickey testifying hi bis ex-wife's second bid to nullify their 1983 said H wes Sherri Spfllane's idea to break op with him after 19 years of marriage. the creator of fie- tioaal detective Mflce testified Monday that he tried to cooperate with his who initiated divorce proceed- ings. He said they agreed on an divorce settlement Sherri who had lead roles in Las Vegas musicals in the early remarried within minutes of the April 1983 divorce and Spillane re- married six months later. She is seeking an annulment of her latest marriage On Las District Judge Myron Leavttt refused again to nullify the divorce. She said she wis unem ployed with little and cited monthly expenses includ- ing for clothing aad for her makeup and nails For a look at other people IE the news ptge 3 LOTTERY Numbers drawn yesterday Three-digit SSI Pick 4 INDEX 4 a Calendar eoiomnt Bdterials Eatertahr read page 41-4i 47 41 ie 1445 11-14 Zl-22 11 11 2S-S3 15 State to seek drought aid HOUM photo FARMER Earl shows his stunted com yesterday to Gov. and agriculture secretary Wayne A. Cawley. Heat turns city into a ghost town By LINDA DUELING Staff Writer There was a noticeable change in downtown Annapolis yesterday as the temperature zoomed past 90 degrees for the' third consecutive day. The usually bustling heart of the city looked like a ghost town. The. heat had forced most people elsewhere to an air-conditioned a public pool or simply home to sit in front of a fan. The p.m. Annapolis tempera- ture was 99 degrees. The sidewalks on the sunny side of Main Street at J p.m. were nearly empty. On the shady a few shoppers walked slowly in and out of air-conditioned stores. tt'f the fceg tiring to Even the those Unlucky enough to visit during a beat acted differently. Hot weather is slow weather. Bartender Tony t works at Uncle Harry's Cafe on State said the heat slowed him down. there were few customers at his outdoor bar. Few wanted to go on walking tours of the city. OK if I don't get any more Mazzoni said. just Visitors were more likely to stop by the tourist office of Historic Annapolis Inc. asking for water than to sign up to spend an hour walking around in the said Eric Gold- a tour guide. Those who did join the walking chance to cool off in the air-ttmdftkmed State House and St. Anne's Church. you know you're in trouble when you tour Picket Gardens and everyone is more interested in the water Goldstein said. Karen a visitor from spent most of the afternoon at the Annapolis Mall. Then she headed downtown to see the sights. ea Page CoL Dixie Is sizzling. Page 2. NAVY NAG Rickover no academy fan By EFFIE COTTMAN Staff Writer He called his alma mater an Coast and an in which adolescence can be continued indefinitely Lore him or hate the Naval Academy will never forget Adm. Hyman G who died yes- terday at his Virginia home Known as the of the nuclear be- gan his 80-year Naval career on the academy's Annapolis campus. Later H became a frequent targef of his sharp-tongued attacks. His style was not universally but the cantan- kerous officer left an indelible mark on the Navy and the lives of those be touched would generally conclude that there are very few neutral people on Adm. Rickover. Be was contro- said James cu- rator of the Naval Academy museum Retired Capt William Sims of THE FATHER of the nuclear Mm. Hymen Q. Mekovar epoke In 1974 at tha Naval 52 But Rickover's recorded com- ments were just as unsettling In be blasted the Naval Academy as East Coast Dis- neyland The next midship- men painted a mural of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs on a fence at the school ea CeL Annapolis still recalls vividly his first encounter with the Russian- born nuclear expert During an uterview for the Navy's nuclear power Rickover embarrassed and humiliated the young naval officei. you you felt like you had been totally said who tUD doesn't know why he ww accepted into the program. Former President Jimmy Carter also became Rickover fan years after one of those gut-wrenching interviews Applicants recall sitting in a chair with the front tegs cot short to make them feel 01 at although that tale may be rooted more the embellished memories of nervous officers thaa ia fact Rlckow 2. County spending ranks 4th in U.S. BM MTTCHELL Staff Writer Wbea it COSMS to ijiMMlmi Aroadei Ceaatr hitffs oat wtta Ike atf si nailing to a afflea hi Bseal ft per aeraaa thaa aB bet a eeadveted ay city stttt nafaxbM The magazine study reviewed the SO with tike badgets In the United For every woman aad child ia ABM the county sport SMM la fiscal the study shews. Deajate the high county officiate deay Aaae it says is Aaae Araadel Ceaatv is a seattatieated COBB- said Ceaaty Executive 0. James UfMMxer of the tarvey sahs Aaae Anutdel's ranked high oa saeadlag even thfrvgh its population is among the lowest of the counties surveyed The ooaatr's mjtt in- haMtaats pat tt 47th aateaf the counties to aeaalatioa in terms of the amoeat of H per Aaae Araadei aheal af naiUii wUh efttes as Ctteafft. Detroit The high AraadaTs rete as that ajshain services do said eoanty Harm county In Is a very itrong unit of local government Generally the county unit of government to Maryland is re- tpoBSfide for everything from police sad fin protection to the school she said. For Arandel COBB- ty fuads schools and whereas soeae other Matties are not tttfOMMe tor she said The survey also showt Page Cei. Crops are a disaster By JUDI PERLMAN Staff Writer Federal disaster relief sounds good but the only thing farmer Earl Griffith wants for his parched crops is a good dose of rain. going downhill fast. This weather is killing he told Gov. Harry Hughes yesterday as they examined the drought's devastating effects on Griffith's Lothian farm. To help farmers survive the eco- nomic difficulties of what he called worst drought in a 100 Hughes announced that he will ask the federal government for disaster relief. is a crisis to the farmer in Maryland. I've never seen anything like this before. It's an absolute Hughes said. Federal disaster designation would make farmers eligible for low-inter- est emergency feed and other services of the federal government. Hughes asked the state Depart- ment of Agriculture to assess the impact of the drought in each coun- and to step up assistance To especially for soil erosion. The governor also said he will ask lending institutions to and cooperate with farmers who are already in a difficult economic situa- tion of low low yields and lack of export taking al the action we can rather than waiting until the rain falls said who is also a Democratic candidate for the US. Senate. But who has lost virtually all of his almost 70 percent of his com and much of his said a tow-interest loan is not the especially for this year's crops. disaster loan Is not going to help the farmer. You can borrow money at a cheaper rate but most farmers like me are already borrow- ing too much. was better off leaving that on Page CoL Store wars Safeway lease taken to court By DEBRA VIADERO Business Writer The owners of the Eastport Shop- ping Center asked a county judge yesterday to decide if Safeway Stores Inc must replace the store it is closing there with another super- market In papers filed in Circuit Eastport Plaza Limited Partnership asked for an interpretation of the lease and other written agreements between the shopping center and its biggest tenant. The piasa owners want to know whether the California-bawd super- market chain is legally bound to keep a supermarket operating there either by subleasing the square-foot space to a competitor or by keeping its own store open The Eastport Safeway is set to close July 19 Another 17 years remain on the store's tease contend that it says that the space should not only be rented by a supermarket but that ft will be occupied by a ntpennar said C Edward Hartman II. i lawyer for the shopping center own- ers The supermarket has been i fix at the shopping center since it opened to ISO Last Safeway officials announced plans to close the a longtime mooey-loter for the supermarket chain The news prompted protests among Eactport's elderly many of whom walked almost dafly to do their shopping at that Safeway The store was especially Bnpiilar aaNftg rasidiats of Watergate VB- lage. aa complex el aheat l.m reaUeats befeted the sheppiag center Both the County Council and the Cfty have pined rnolnlinii urging Safeway to allow mother It Gel VJ   

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