Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1986 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Capital, The (Newspaper) - June 28, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               J. V A V Retail Ads Business Classified Circuiatlor .Newsroon 108-9000 268-8000 268-7000 O VOL CINQ. GOOD' PONT FORGET BUYBBS AND idlers are welcome at a fond-raiser flea market sponsored by The Arundel County Fair Inc. frwa a.m. to 3 p.m. today and tomorrow at the fair- grounds on Route 178 in Crownsville. HOME OF THE WEEK JUDY AND HAL McBee's house is designed to accommo- date an outdoor-orient- ed family. Page 6. ENTERTAINMENT THE HIT summer movie is helping reverse the Navy's slide in recruiting high school graduates. Page 19. STATE AN OUTSIDE agency will be called in to evaluate child abuse investigations following the death of a 9-year-old boy. Page 4. ITALIAN SOCIALIST Pre- mier Bettino Craxi resigned last night after losing a secret parliamentary vote. Page 2. THE NEARLY trillion fis- cal 1087 spending plan Con- grew approved yesterday is only the beginning of a strug- gle to find about 140 billion in savings. Page 3. ORIOLES ROGER CLEMENS and the Red Sox defeat the 5-3. Page 11. NAVY TIME HAS not yet begun to heal the disappointment of Navy rugby's 4-0 loss to Dart- mouth. Page 15. PEOPLE REDD who has been known to use spicy language in his comedy was hit with a breach of contract suit for to promote a barbecue sauce bear- ing his name. The bil- jlion in US Court in by Granite Ltd. and William Thompson Prdocutions claims that Foxx reneged on a contract to help sell Foxx Barbe- cue and Foxx Seasoning by acting as a spokesman for the products. who starred in the television comedy and never showed up for commercials and other promo- tions even though he signed an agreement in 1983 to promote the products in exchange for a percentage of the profits and part ownership in the compa- said Rochester attorney Louis J. who filed the lawsuit Thursday on behalf of Granite The which hired i contracter to make the took an initial order of cases when the opera- tion was forced to the lawsuit Mid For a look at other people in the fee page 3 LOTTERY Numbers drawn Three-digit 821 Pick 4 27CS INDEX 4 44 Ctleadar Classified Adi columns Editorials Entertainment OWtauries PobceBeat Stock ttrtfatgs liftings 5 2443 21 43 I If Iff t t 7 11 17 20 18 Tomorrow's Partly sunny For see page 8. JUNE 25 Cemtf bridge tie-ups likely By EFFIE COTTMAN Staff Writer The path to safer travel on the Severn River Bridge wilT be paved with unprecedent- ed and unavoidable traffic jams and acci- traffic experts predicted yesterday. Construction begins next week pn a 20- month project to widen the Route bridge from four to six lanes. During that a bridge already plagued with accidents and traffic congestion will have narrower a smaller a lower speed limit and fewer lights. All those factors traditionally jam traffic and result in more according to state police Sgt. Thomas Y. Ingram. firefighters and state safety workers met with highway officials to figure out what to expect during the million construction project. They also learned that most of the antici- pated problems can't be prevented. Work to last 20 months The State Highway Administration is doing everything possible to ensure safety and reduce the impact on according to Paul SHA's interstate coordinator. The department is lowering the bridge speed limit and barring oversized loads from the Bender said. Contractors are willing to set up a hotline between the bridge and police post warning signs and keep a boat on site for emergencies. To reduce four lanes will remain open during the day and on weekend and holiday he said. One lane in each direction will be closed at night starting in about a month. Those lanes could be reopened if an accident elsewhere increases bridge said William SHA project engineer. Despite these there is a danger of trucks knocking down concrete falling into the river and increased delays after officials said. know we're going to have Ingram said. Even without the bridge poses he said. someone's going to break down between Baltimore and they do it on the Severn River Bridge. like to look at scenery and end up rear-ending someone. We have house trailers go over the trucks burn up on the bridge. bridge has something here every Ingram said. The presence of construction crews usually slows traffic and increases he said. Narrower lanes and a barricade median also are known causes of be said. To keep four lanes open during the heaviest driving construction crews will re- place the median with a short wall and narrow the lanes from 12 to feet. Crews will work on the outside edges of the which eventually will be fitted with steel extenders. During that outside the bridge lights will be reducing visibility at night. Boaters also may be affected during that phase when parts of the outside of the bridge are said Bill project manager for Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. of Baltimore. As the bridge edge is the river beneath it may be closed to boaters in case any concrete falls from the he said. The demolition will be done in stages so boaters still will be able to pass beneath other Photo by Bob Gilbert COOLING OFF in Spa Creek last week from Gary Gene and Chuckle 14. WATER HAZARD pools can be a threat to health By SCOTT LAUTENSCHLAGER Staff Writer Your favorite swimming hole be it a natural creek or a concrete pool may be hazardous to your health Health officials are advising against swim- ming in several county waterways because of pollution And high bacteria levels forced the closing of three county pools this spring The county Health Department has issued warnings for Furnace and Rock creeks in North County and an area of Rose Haven Harbor in South County. The public is not prohibited from swimming in those said Larry the supervis- ing sanitarian for bathing beaches But the department recommends no swim- ming because the high bacteria levels could infect open wounds or cause he said Luck said he informally advises against swimming in any county waterways when a person has open sores becauses risks of infec- tion always exist The sources of water pollution are large sewage systems operated by the county or other septic systems and runoff from Luck said. State health officials are investigating whether Furnace Creek is being contaminated by chemicals disposed at the old Glen Burnie Luck said The polluted area of Rose Haven Harbor in south 200 yards north of the west has been contaminated by the privately run Rose Haven wastewater treatment Luck said. Three areas of Rock Creek are covered by the headwaters from Isles Dnve to Valley Wall and White's Cove. The Health Department is awaiting test results that will indicate the source of pollution in the headwaters area Pollution in White's Cove is partly attributed to runoff from a horse but the source of on Page Col. LOOK BEFORE LEAPING Don't go in the water when you have open sores. Before swimming in creeks or other natural look for signs warning about unhealthy conditions. For more information call the county Health Department at 224-7241. Tips for pool Maintain chlorine levels of 1 to 3 parts per million. Keep pH level near 7.4. Don't allow the level of chlorine sUbflizer to rise above 100 parts per or the water will become cloudy and chlorine will lose effectiveness. For more information call the Health Department at 224-7217 on Page Col. Help near Alzheimer deaths leave questions By SCOTT LAUTENSCHLAGER Staff Writer Using the network of services for victims of Alzheimer's disease could avert a tragedy such as the murder- suicide this week in Severna according to professionals familiar with the disorder. Those services include nursing and personal care in the adult day-care and nursing homes. Area professionals had varied re- actions to Wednesday which occurred woen aa elderly man killed his an ap- parent victim of Alzheimer's dis- and himself. Relatives and neighbors said the husband had been feeling a lot of pressure from dealing with his wife's illness. surprised it doesn't happen more said Patricia a registered nurse who supervises an adult day-care center in Glen Bur- nie. Even when support services are still not easy It's still just she said. But Dr Paul a Crofton physician who specializes in treating the said he could not under- stand why it happened. are many support systems for victims and their he said. tapping into the support perhaps this horrible trage- dy could have been Thomas of 702 Oak Grove shot his then killed himself with the same county police said Both were 80 years old Police concluded that Mrs. May had Alzheimer's disease based on interviews with relatives and neigh- bors and on prescription drugs found in the Detective Mark Howes said Alzheimer's is a brain disorder that causes progressive decline of mental capability Results can in- clude memory inability to per- form simple tasks and behavioral problems Schaefer visits Tour launches campaign By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Everybody loves a winner When Baltimore Mayor William Donald Scbaefer caue to Annapolis to make official his bid for governor. Annapolis Mayor Dennis Callahan made sure Schaefer got 3 warm welcome think the mayor is a winner Callahan said of hit reason for inviting tbc Scbaefer and hit running mate Senate President Kelvin A to spend moirt of the day campaigning in capi tal city goes without saying that I want to be associated with a fellow that's gong to win the governor's race Mid Cattafcan ts looking for a larger cbare of the state budget pie for Amupohs and has said be plans to ask the General Assembly for more money next year Scbaefer and Steinberg's peak at Annapolis yesterday inchtded visits to businesses along inner West the Arundel complete with a view the county execu lire's office a stroll down Main up Street to the historic Shiplap House and a boat nde to Carrol s Creek Cafe for a caviar and champagne reception The pasr got their warmest come from senior citizens at the Glenwood Senior where they greeted residents in the activity room TTe seniors got the chocolate cake with chocolate inng left over from the reception look younger and more handsome than you do on Ethel Disney told Scfeaefer promise you one thing we will not forget the seniors Schaefer told Mrs Disney and others In Balti more we emphasize housing for sen- iors safe bousing One of the few negative responses came as Schtefer and his following M Page on Page Col tot M BALTIMORE MAYOR DonaM Scheeter and hrt entourage encountered campaign tor Me opponent during tour of Annapolift. From left ere County Executive 0 James running MeMn A. Steinberg. end Rrenda Callahan. wife of Mayor Dennis CaJtfhen   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication