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Annapolis Capital: Thursday, June 26, 1986 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - June 26, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Experts hope Bias' death deters cocaine use By SCOTT LAUTENSCHLAGER Staff Writer Witnessing a rise in cocaine use among county area drug experts hope the tragic death of basketball star Len Bias will help turn people away from the drug. Bias' cocaine-induced death drives home the point that the drug is dangerous even when used only said Eric .coordinator of Anne Aruridel County's Drug and first time you use you can have a Avery said. The 22-year-old an All-Amer- ica athlete at the University of Maryland in College died last Thursday in his dormitory room on the College Park campus. The state medical examiner said this week that death was directly caused by cocaine intoxica- tion. Bias diftd -beeuwfr dow of highly pure cocaine interrupted the etecUi- cal activity of his nervous causing his heart to beat irregularly and cutting off blood flow to the Medical Examiner Dr. John Smialek said. The death supports recent findings by who are starting to recognize that a single experience with the drug can cause death by stopping the heart. But it remains unclear how common such reactions are. there dence of previous cocaine use in confirming statements by friends and athletic officials that he had no history of using the drug. Bias is classic case of some- body who has made good such as pursuing a college until using Avery said. The county will incorporate the Bias story into it's campaign against drug he said. but it really brought to the of -wcttttte IncT the 'tragedy nf Avery saldT Even if cocaine doesn't kill you might become a fatal- ity in another he men- tioning death hi a traffic accident or time hi prison as possibilities. hope it scares some said Jonathon clinical direc- tor of Focus on a drug treatment program operated by the Anne Arundel County Health Depart- ment. are thousands of sad cases like Simons and Avery said it is in- creasingly common for county resi- dents to seek treatment for cocaine use. During his first year in the county's drug abuse Avery said he didn't receive a single ias' death will have a signifi- cant impact on local cocaine use. would be nice if it but I don't think it Simons said. Bias nporttdly bought tight grams of drug for Pag0 23. Retail Busines Classify Circulati Newsroom 3 u i55E zoo-auuu 1C Tomorrow's Fair hot For see page 9. VOL Cl NO. 150 MARYLAND. JUNE 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET THE. ARUNDEL Hospice will hold a benefit dance from p.m. to a.m. tomor- row at the Severna Park Elks Lodge. AREA RESIDENTS say traffic is the top problem. Page 35. SEVERNA OLDE Severna Park Village Center is for sale. Page 45. DRIVE IT BOB SIKORSKY'S car care column debuts today. Page 41. THOMAS POINT CHARLES and Naomi Smith are retiring. Page 17. LIVING MOST INVENTIONS don't bring riches. Page 13. DIN ING OUT THE MENU at Herrington Harbour carries old favorites. STATE JOHNS HOPKINS will be a test site for new AIDS treat- ments. Page 4. NATION THE HOUSE approves aid aid for Nicaragua's Contras. Page 2. BOATING THE STBBLE family domi- nates regatta. Page 31. SPORTS FOUR Tiger homenms whip the 11-2. Page 23 PEOPLE Comedian Lily Tomiin and her brother plan to open a tea gift shop and gaUeria in downtown Ky ''Lily Tomlm's on will open in September and will fea- ture manne- quins of some of her such as Er- nestine the operator and little girl Edith Ann hive worked together so in and out of show that we thought we would do this Hiss Tomiin said of her Richard Their Lillie Mae is western Kentucky native who returned after the death of ber hatband in 1970 LOTTERY drawn yesterday Three-digit 4tt 4 INDEX I si pi get Calendar Classified Aib cefaunnt Crsstword 31 15 For the Record Obttaariea PeMeeBeat Park Seerts Tekvtatoe listings u 10-11 M-M 42-U 9 I 2142 J7 minium......IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII........nm........iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinifMiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiii FELINE FIXTURE IIHIIItj Photo by Suun SMnkamp THE RESIDENT feline at The Haunted Bookshop on Main relaxes with some of his favorite literature. Pets take up city's shops By KEVIN DRAWBAUGH Staff Writer You have to wonder about a cat who gets Christmas cards especially if he gets more than you. This popular pet is called Mike and he fives in The Haunted Bookshop on Main Street. A lot of shops in Annapolis have live-in but Mike is the superstar. If he could this cat would be signing autographs He is so popular people stop in the bookshop all day to say hello to said co owner Vicki Metzger Police officers tip their hats to him at when he sleeps in the storefront window. His picture and name are on the front of a line of sweatshirts and tank tops that sell so fast Ms. Metzger can't keep them in stock don't know what it is He just has this special personality We had a woman come in from Oregon the other day just to see said Denise shop manag- er 5 years old and a hefty 16 was a malnourished and muddy stray who showed up at the shop a few years ago. Ms. Metzger took him in and he hasn't left since. doesn't like to go outside and he doesn't like to go home with she said. we do take him he hides in the closet or under the bed. The only thing that brings him out is choral particu- larly For reasons most shop owners can't ex- it became a few years ago to have a pet hanging around the store or office. The Footnotes shoe shop on Main Street on Page Col. Buckling up begins Tuesday By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Annapolis police have been required to buckle up since April County pobce got the official order to wear their seat belts about a year ago Beginning almost all other Mary- land motorists and their front seat passenger will be required to fasten their seat belts Failure to comply with the law can bring a although motorists cannot be cited the violation unless they are stopped for some other traffic violation But in some including Anne Arundel motorists will have a one month to get used to the new law Pobce Officer V Richard county police said Police Chief William S Lindsey issued a memorandum today saying the county is joining other law enforcement agencies in granting the grace period City pobce do not have plans for such a grace according to spokesman Cpl William Powell Powell said he has had many calls from motorists who want to know how the new law will work had a lot of people call who have Powell said. like any- thing new It will take some getting used to The state's new seat belt law is just one of a host of other measures that will take effect July 1 There's good news for boaters the title and sales taxes on boats are ebminated beginning July 1 Boaters will pay only a 5 percent excise tax and boat who had been responsible for collecting the will relinquish that responsibility to the Depart- ment of Natural Resources People who water-ski for pleasure will be os Page Col. .Man kills ill spouse Then shoots self at home By DAN CASEY and LORRAINE AHEARN Staff Writers An 80-year-old Severna Park who could no longer cope with his wife's Alzhei- mer's shot and killed her and then himself last county police said. The at 702 Oak Grove Circle hi Manhattan occurred at said Officer V. Richard county police spokesman. Thomas Henry shot his Lily once in the then shot himself in the head with a .38-caliber Molloy said. Mrs. in her late was apparently suffering from Alzheimer's police laid. She required constant which her husband Molloy said. After he shot bis wife toot before he killed May caned Irene a niece in and told her he couldn't stand the pressure of taking care of his Molloy said. Mrs. Duvall called her Charles Du- also of Baltimore. He called but before officers May had shot him- Molloy said. 'When police did the house was locked and no one answered the front door. Officers forced open a side door after they looked in a window and saw Mrs. May lying on a bed in the master bedroom. May was found on a bed in a spare bedroom of the brick the gun beside him. No suicide fiote ma Molloy said. Hay not psycho or anything. He was just under too much pressure. I guess he couldn't handle it any Charles Duvall said. don't know that she hat Alzheimer's but she was getting Duvall said. Alzheimer's an irreversible brain results hi memory loss and confu- sion beyond the normal effects of according to medical experts. As the disease victims become disoriented and gradually lose the ability to move around and use everyday ob- jects. There is no known cure for the in which patients can deteriorate to the point that they do not recognize family members or remember their own identity. Chemically induced degeneration can set off a chain of radical personality changes such as agitation and even verbal and physical aggression. Duvall said be last saw the Mays when he attended a 55th wedding anniversary party for them at their home June be said. At that Mrs. May know half of the 15 people all close family members who were Duvall said A neighbor described the who had DO as private Gladys Anna said Mrs May's condition had worsened oa Page Col. Plant hunt aids check on bay's health id KFFIE COTTMAN StalT Writer Wading at Franklin Manor Beach Linda Hurley of Deale hap peoed upon some thin little grasses brushing against ber feet Most people wouldn't have ooticed But to Miss a biologist for the US Fish and Wildlife the discovery wss a new clue ia unraveling the mysteries of the Chesapeake Bay Grasses that sprout from river beds are one of the best of water the said So the Fish sod Wfkffife Service asd three other afeaeies aitd envi- froept tare Uoacbel a search for these grass- es to hefe assess the heatth of the IF YOU SPOT these end other grasses etong the the government to hear from you 2M-S44A bay The groups are asking and who along local to take note of thsDow-water kaowa scien- tifically submerged aquatic vege- or to get n nsea H left and it's of detaf. Hurley can't pouibly cover the entire said Anne Swanson of the Chesapeake Bay which also is sponsoring the search hope to hare a bufe corps of votBsteers spread baprUe More than 200 citisens already have agreed to participate in tht search Offieisls they aeed to peapk to caver the eattre bay and its tributaries ia Maryland atdVirftoia la charter boat have beet hired by the state Depart- meat of Natwal Reaevces to cover areas aot surveyeal hy vohtttatn The Cttiseas Profraai for UM Chesapeake Bay also is parttelpatjBij ea Pafe CeL   

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