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Annapolis Capital: Monday, June 9, 1986 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - June 9, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Monday Red-hot O's swat NY. see PAGE is ndel Report Retai Busii Class Circt Newsroom 208-5000 I Tomorrow's Fair dry For eee page 15. VOL. Cl NO. 135 ANNAPOLIS. JUNE 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET CHILDREN 2 to 5 may wear pajamas and bring a stuffed toy to bedtime storytime at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the South County 5940 Deale- Churchton Deale. AREA A MEDICAL examiner says Assistant State's Attorney James Yates shot but the possibility of foul play is being investigated. Page 17. ACTION LINE The Capital's consumer col- umn helps a reader with a missing car part. Page 17. ENTERTAINMENT PERFORMANCES are scheduled for the Annapolis Arts Festival. Page 12. STATE SENATE PRESIDENT Mel- vin Steinberg is expected to join Mayor Schaefer's ticket today. Page 4. ISRAEL protests of Kurt Waldbeim's election. Page 2. INVESTIGATORS blame the ftXDsOSvQQ'' 'Ott hardware and poor SPORTS LARRY BIRD leads the Celt- ics to their 16th NBA champi- onship. Ptge 18. HOR8ERACINQ WOODY STEPHENS' Dan- sig Connection wins the Bel- moot Stakes. Page Actor Hem the 3-foot-ll former co-star of TV's wai ed after allegedly kicking a 6- f o o t 3 process server. V i 1 1 e who played Tat- sidekick to Rioardo Montalban's Mr. was freed without bail Friday. Police said the actor was leaving a res- taurant with his Don- na when process server Eric handed him papers in a civil case involving Ms. Hagen. After taking the the actor them down OB the ground and stepped on police said. guy leaned down to pick up the papers and Herve grabbed hit arm and kkked him twice in the then pointed to the gay tod 'You're and point- ed to hit ex-wife tod police Vlllecbatze denied tutt- ing Brownsoo. For i look it other people to the newt page 3 LOTTERY Nam ben drawn Thrw-difit SM Pick 4 Lotto INDEX 2 32 pafei Calendar Classified Ada Croewvrd KdKorUb Sports TeteiMoa 7 24-90 SI 25 14 11-13 15 15 Police 6crack down9 Dock targeted in city campaign By JUDIPERLMAN Staff Writer If you stand quietly at the edge of City Dock drinking a can of police will force you to spill it out or place you under arrest. But if you step down into a you can drink as much as you want and police can't do anything about it. Boats filled with young adults guzzling beers are where much of downtown's noise stems city police say. Other public nuisances come from drunken who gather in the alleys of residential areas and the corners of Main yelling obscenities at passers-by. This past city police were out in full force to stamp out excessive noise and drinking on the streets after Mayor Dennis CaUaban ordered them to do it to clean up downtown. The crackdown came after Callahan's office received several reports of public excessive littering and property damage two weekends ago. weekend is not one we should be ia a Housing evidence was tfiin Transcripts show proof lacking against commissioners By BOB MITCHELL Staff Writer Charges against four Annapolis Housing Authority commissioners beard in closed ses- sion collapsed after tenant attorneys present- ed a case based on newspaper articles and other hearing transcripts show. Citing lack of Mayor Dennis CaUaban last week dismissed the last of nine allegations brought against Housing Board Chairman Everett 0. Petttgrew and Commis- sioners Rev. Winstow D. William Amos Jr. and Bruce E. Williamson. The mayor dismissed the other charges it a May 15 hearing in City Hall. Only one witness was called to testify during the May 1 and May 15 according to transcripts provided to The Capital by attorneys for the commissioners. The attorney for the commissioners argued that in two cases evidence of alleged wrongdo- ing actually cleared the commissioners of the the transcript shows. In several lawyers who brought the allegations attempted to prove their case by submitting newspaper stories and then arguing that minutes of Housing Authority board meetings showed no record of the accusations in the articles being according to the transcripts. The only witness who appeared during the two hearings was City Clerk Patricia who testified regarding the authenticity of a letter concerning financial disclosure forms from the the transcripts show. you put it all there was absolutely no evidence offered on any commissioners' attorney Michael E. Jaffe said at a press conference last week. At the May 15 attorney Susanne on Page Col. to pat up with the kind of abuses which were evident this That meant quieting down youths who loiter in the streets. It also meant patrolling alleys where teen-agers often bide drink and where they can easily scurry off into the darkness when an officer approaches. Police Chief John Schmitt said his officers were ordered to become less lenient with offenders. taking a stronger stand because people were ignoring the Schmitt said. If individuals are drinking in they're to be arrested with little or DO he said. If they're disturbing the they will be arrested rather than constantly told to move 00. This police either were still more tolerant or the public was better behaved. There were only two downtown-relat- ed arrests. Often officers allowed street drinkers to pour on Page Col. Council members zero in on districts By CHRISTINE NEUBERGER Staff Writer County Council members know they only need votes in their own districts to win re-election in Novem- ber snd last month it showed. Parochialism surfaced during budget deliberations in what is called an inevitable effect of the election-by-district system approved for this fall. With district elections only five months some council mem- bers looked out for their own constit- uents so consistently that they may bare toft sight of what's best for the entire observers say. What does this narrow-mlndedneM mean for One given by supporters of district is more respon- sive county representatives. Other answers are more roads and other improvements and more taxes to pay for the extra projects. going to have more projects or at least more being put into the budget to show constitu- ents that council members are doing their said county Auditor Jo- seph H. the council'i fiscal watchdog. you have one park in one there will be pressure to have parks in the other six districts It'i ANALYSIS what people voted for and they'll ha veto pay for Historically council members have kept a close eye on their own dis- tricts. Candidates were nominated by district in the under the old yet they ran county- wide in the general election. But their views grew understand- ably more near-sighted after No- vember 1964. That's when voters decided council mem ben should be elected in each of the seven districts. Thii year perspectives have oar- rowed observers say. With all seven council members seeking their more insu- lar attitudes surprised no one. In- cluding themselves. was much more parochial. We left each district up to the person whose district it said County Councilwoman Maureen D- Annapolis. Most council members agreed that when the construction budget got trimmed they protected their areas and projects more ardently than ever before. At In the the council rejected doteni of the retain- ing virtually everything for a diitrict when its representative requested it. But if someone wanted a project unlike previous col- leagues almost nevtr publicly ques- tioned its value. Equally telling was the series of unanimous votes saving numerous targets. Here are a few auditor-eyed tar- gets that the council retained upon a member's The north county swimming pool and the North Glen recreation two projects that Councilman M Page Col. union won't Mn. Ptfft 17. 'Is life going to remain one big 15 million face crisis of confidence Editor'i Attocittfd Prtu Writer Juice Boptoni Ttnne gtot txphr log By JANICE VOFEIN8 TANNE Aavedatotf PTBM Writer Between ages IS tod people worry atari thttr ft their tbeir ajrwvtag their aging par- sail tbeir commmKj or social actiffttea. They ask theatsetm. tkis aD there Is ttfe to coatawe to ht Mg Crtsee occur to fee anid-life bvt assay people aren't aware why they happen or bow to deal with them. About 75 million are between 45 and the vulnerable About 15 mil- boa of UtesB are Qkely to expert eoee a mid-life crUU that can aix to two Amacioflr. few ttndiei have been of the crucial JS to yean of life. know a lot abort efeiM developnent and they're tarniaf more about bvt they have learned relatively Httto about the important tveae the aaidtife years. artMife crisis is wbea yon yov'rc no loafer a potential that you've come THE MID-LIFE CRISIS FAIT I about as far ai you're going to penooaQy or Mid Michael L. Preedttsa. aa expert on aging at New York Unirmtty M ed kalCearter. Psyehoaofists caD this phase the ntM-Wt treasttkn If one swMeaiy me atort diffieott to endure it's ealM a crisis. emotional turmoil that etui ei the perton to re-evaluate put behavior and toward uid psychiatrist Dr Lawr- ence who organ lied Keep Midlife Challenging a national organixatioD for people of mM-lift age baaed in Middle town. N.J Surveying 1JM people between ages 17 be fond that career financial pres- health aad aenallty were tbeir major coocenu They aiso bad ptyebotofkal WOT riei aboal baviag to take of tbeir eWerly parenta instead of beiag abk to rely M them as they had in the past Another change involved tbeir who were becoming increasingly aelf-reliant Other men and women lurveyed admitted that being lonely and having that life was ing then by posed Mid-life crises teen to be more common in men than in although women art more likely to softer froso depresatoa thai met. crisis U hard to fo through at aoy age. bvt H may be easier at than at 40. easier at 49 then at you have more ukj Daafel J a Yak University ptychotofift Cai   

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