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Annapolis Capital: Friday, April 11, 1986 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - April 11, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               I notified- 268-7000 HOWELL MICROFILMS P. 0. BOX 1558 LAUREL MD 20707 Worming tip For aaa page 0. VOL Cl NO. 86 APRIL 25 Cents Family wants 'some justification' for tragedy GREECE Explosion On TWA 727 VICTIMS were found in viflageofArgofr By LORRAINE AHEARN Staff Writer When family members of the three An- residents killed in a terrorist jet bombing last week arrived in Greece to claim the they were struck by the poverty of the town where shepherds dis- covered the bodies. In an attempt to find justifica- for the relatives who re- turned to Annapolis last night with the three caskets containing the remains set up a fund for the seaside village of Argos. After learning that their family was among the four passengers killed April 2 on a plane approaching relatives first traveled to Argos to identify the bodies of Demetra daughter Maria and Mrs. Klug's 8-month- old Demetra Kristina. were touched by the children of the attorney Nicholas Kallis said of Warren Klug the baby's and Kathy Mrs. Klug's older sister. wanted the fund in an effort to find some justification for baby Demetra kind of beautiful when you think of that they would have the presence of mind to respond to a tragedy that said a family friend who will administer the fund. the only way you can As the Greek Orthodox church the two women attended prepared for Saturday's funeral service expected to include top U.S. officials as guests the caskets were last night returned to Baltimore Wash- ington International Airport. A family friend who picked up the relatives arriving home on the same which landed just before 7 said last night the family was exhausted after the long trip and a three-hour stop in New York. The caskets were placed in three hearses on the and family mem- bers were driven back to Annapolis in limousines escorted by five state police cruisers. Kallis said there has been a united effort to help the family in the past an effort not confined to the Greek-American community. This week the local Jewish which has long-standing ties to Greek immigrants made contribu- tions to the Argos Fund through Jewish War Veterans and the Kne- seth Israel Congregation in Annapolis. all the years we've been very said attorney Leonard Bulman. He recalled a joint Greek-Jewish New Year's Eve party five years and the Greek M Page CoL GOOD PONT FORGET THE BALLET Theatre of Annapolis will present its spring concert at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow at Annapolis Senior High 2700 Riva Road. Call 956-2176. AREA THE PUBLIC wants results in the bay cleanup. Page 33. ETCETERA FERDINAND MARCOS is named president of St. John's College. Just kidding. Page 33. HEALTH There's no Page SOUTH COUNTY A CREEKS commission tar- gets illegal aien.Patfe.JA BUSINESS FAILING BANKS will get ARUNDEL ARTIST RAOUL Middleman paints explosions of color. Page 30. STATE GOV. HARRY Hughes holds a fund-raiser. Page 4. NATIONS WORLD KHADAFY says there's no proof Libya is a force in ter- rorism. Page 2. SPORTS THE CAPS take a lead over the Islanders. Page 23. PEOPLE If RICHARD FRIEDMAN'S campaign slo- gans like be a fine judge if I'm any judge at sound like country and western it's no mistake. Friedmi founder of the country. western band Kinky Friedman and tbe Texas Jew has decided to try his hand at politics by running for Kerr- justice of the peace. never been a political Friedman said yes- terday. the I've just been an I Friedman's songs have in- claded such titles as Don't Make Jews Like and Your Bis- catts in the Oven and Your Baas in For a look at other people in the news tee page A LOTTERY Numbers drawn Three-digit IIS Pick 4 ir .M-4S ...a ....as i MAT MAN Nurse's aide is pro wrestler By SCOTT LAUTENSCHLAGER Staff Writer David Coleman leads a double life. During the he works at Anne Arundel General Hospital as a nursing assistant. He transports pa- tients to and from surgery and helps out in the operating room. But on weekends he becomes one of the bad boys of the Boston-based International Wres- tling Federation. SPOTLIGHT on people Coleman's job as a professional is to pin please the tans. A wrestler's career hinies on well fee crowd reacts to said who describes the trasjnesft as entertainment of the 23-year-old Severn resident is in a minor league of professional but he as- pires to higher things. who stands 6 feet 5 inches tall and weighs 260 would love to share the mat with the stars of the World Wrestling Federa- such as or Kong His motivations are admittedly mercenary. is in this business to make and that's basically he said. By jumping into the ring under the guise of white blue surgical mask Coleman is playing out a childhood fantasy. His account of his wrestling career thus far has a fairytale ring to it. As a young he spent Saturday afternoons at worshipping his professional wrestling heroes in frontof the TV. An ill-fated career as a high school wrestler followed. The highlights were having his jaw broken and getting kicked off the team for allegedly he said. But his interest and he regularly attended professional on Page Col. Rouse plan debate over Conference center hearing runs SI hours By JUDI PERLMAN South County Staff Writer After three days and hours of what has been called the most controver- sial and ambiguous case in county zoning history ended last night. At issue is a proposed 250-room conference center in Davidsonville at Route 50 and the South Yesterday's hearing ended at p.m. after hours of debate in which opposing homeowners at- tempted to prove that toe facility ia actually a hotel. More than 30 witnesses from all over the country have Ifl the ease and countless pieces of evidence have been introduced. WiUard Rouse a partner hi Rouse said yesterday that he never expected so much opposftioft and sdmetimes wonders just what helias gotten himself into. don't feel like a chain-itnoJring Rouse testified. outlined our program to the county and asked if it was compatible with the neighborhood. Our intention is not to ruffle feathers or change their he said. think it's a small group of people who are very concerned. All of us have the fear of tbe said who slipped once in his testimony and called the facility a hotel. County Zoning Hearing Officer Robert Wilcox has 30 days to decide whether the conference center and 18-hole golf course is a which is not permitted under residential- agricultural or whether it will be used for commercial and recreational which is'al- lowable by special exception. Rouse already has spent on the project which also includes 14 houses. armed with and brochures from other conference illustrated sev- eral including the facility's impact on nearby communities and roads. They said the center is primarily why is this a I'd to know who's dancing with whom.'' -Thomas DavJdsonvllfo for not and cited articles stating that conference centers are a part of the lodging industry. Wilcox commended both Rouse's witnesses and the homeowners fir their extensive research in present- ing their case. witnesses being here on their own time without the benefit of experts is he said. Rouse It Associates maintained that the facility is geared toward executive businessmen. They said spouses rarely would attend the con- ferences and that music would be minimal. But attorney Thomas Mills of Davidsonville questioned why a large meeting area was labeled in architectural plans as a ballroom. gave extensive testimony that there would be no spouses. You OB Page CoL Moot South 19. Jesus City seeking united boost on tourism INDEX CaJeatUr....... Classified Ads Materials .11-12 f Gas cost fuels hike in visitors By DEBRA VIADERO BaataeM Writer The tourists were clamoring ear- lier than usual this spring for a ride on the Harbor the Mttt Anne and tbe other tour boats that City Dock. So Chesapeake Marine Tours opened its tourist Mason in almost a month earlier than usual. Satan Kilb. who handles tbe Bra's group wasn't sure what brought them to town. But others who work in and around tourists are ntakiag a good lower fuel lover interwt ratei less travel abroad will all contribute to more tourist aacat IB Kart di rector of tbe state Office of ToorM Plan keys on saving waterfront IB a SMS fMBBSC frOBI BIS eeat fai visitor and tour Mica lha lib tfct avertfe of gallon of unleaded gat fatten 211 over tbe last three according to tbe Auto- mobile Gab of Maryland Mark thief of the De- Aaaljrsis aad Paretatting Braaea for the taaaral Daaartmtat af Baaigj. fas htstorteaBy tfaf a I pcreaat ia- crceJB la tnrvat. Qu00n ara out aarty In think it frill have an impact on the ID arhw industry from two stand- Mid Mick ex- ecvtive directory of Trades Association of Maryland probably ttse their botts laort freqaeatly beeaaat of tflordabfjty aad aaalan caa ate thtt at a he By DEBRA VIADERO Battaess Writer Annapolis officials are going on tbe road with tbe city's first strategy for managing iti burgeoning tourism industry need to maximize the public benefit of said Eileen P. city planning aad toning director. can't take the positioa of eight-to-10 years ago that we don't want it. Bat we can control Tbe focusing oa an image of Annapolis as a working maritime and historic evolved from the city's Comareheasive Plan. It spraads recpoasibittty for promo- tion cod naaafCBent of tourism among a network of public aad private offices. city sett the HUB- coordinates and does some of the marketing And private froapt aba da of the narketiaf. la cities were tatrisn is saceaasfal hi a the ctty at eaortt- utiaf Pefartjr said. Pofwtjr lauattai a draft at tht taariaai bBttajftat lyatiay hi a af tha Mafrlaad State Circle Association. Through April city officials wffl gather reac- tion to the strategy from the Greater chamber of Conoierce's Tourism Couadl of AaaapoUs aad Anne Aroodel and other ntsneM and ocujhharhood groops. la addition to devalopiaf tht city wide toarbna the OAet af Plaaahkj aad Tnaiai wffl aba op a plaa tar i SIBBIBBI the ctty'i BafittaM busiaaaaas. of the major raaaaas peopla want la COBM la AaaapoUs is that M still has sat saML oat of the ways af kaeasag it is fotag to bsve to be a tax braak far sites raeb as Petriafs or Sarias where they are ksaaiaf a narttiaM abesaid PanaJaf aad aaatef wttva- viw a profrwa tor dawatawa da- Uadacaatef As an example of aeor aahned ta the aarUaj aur tha rinr at tht CttyDodt. aa tap Cat t   

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