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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: March 21, 1986 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - March 21, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               he Capit Tomorrow's Wanner For see page 9. ANNAPOLIS. FRIDAY7MARCH VOL Cl NO. 68 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET A PUBLIC HEARING on proposed bunting bag limits and related regulations for forest and upland game and furbearers will be held at 1 tonight in the lobby confer- ence room at the Department of Natural 580 Tay- lor Ave. AREA A GROUP of civic and busi- ness leaders want to keep the Maritime Inn project afloat. Page ARUNDEL ARTIST AURORA GALLERY'S spring show is a spirit-lifting exhibit. Page 31. HEALTH LOCAL OFFICIALS are con- cerned by the county's higher- than-average death rate for cancer. Page 11. STATE GOV. HARRY says he's through talking for now about the sale of two bankrupt Maryland thrifts. Page 4. NATION PRESIDENT. REAGAN has vowed to try again for Contra aid. Page 2. SPORTS TEAMS from the Southeast- ern Conference advanced in the NCAA tourney last night. fage 23. PEOPLE .ACTOR says lie spent years in a fog induced by drugs and but a vision of_a_little_girl brought him to his sen- ses. inter- viewed for Sunday's Parade said he be- gan taking drugs and alcohol when ne was 15. By the time he was in his early with such hit movies as Graffi- and Encounters of the Third behind he was a heavy drinker and cocaine he said. bottom was he said. was in real pain I was out of Dreyfuss was hospitalized once in Los Angeles after his car hit a palm tree and flipped. In the emergency he was arrested for pos- session of cocaine. continued to drink and take drugs in the he said. was unwilling to ac- cept what had happened. Jggt u I was being I began to see something very Murre. my mind's I saw an image of a little girl. She was an wearing a pink- and-white dress with crino- black patent-leather pumps and white socks. Final- it came to me. She was the little girl I did not kill by my be said. Since the Dreyfuss he has kicked become a father for the first time in his be feels lite u adatt. For a look at ether people in the news fee ptge 3 LOTTCRY yesterday Pick 4- INOEX 4 44 Calendar Classified Ads rotanas S2 a M-42 ....41 .15 t 11 U t 2J-2T II Police seize guns 3 nabbed in cycle club raid By DAN CASEY Staff Writer County and Annapolis police swooped down on 10 homes and the clubhouse of the Iron Riders motor- cycle club early this con- fiscating guns and drugs. In the pre-dawn one pound of methamphetamine with a street val- ue of more than was seized from a safe at 1443 Old Annapolis Road in Arnold. three people were ar- and 11 more arrests were county police said. Charges are pending Bet- tie Agnes of 111 River- view Jon Scott of 47 Colonial Manor and Christopher Daniel of 90 SummerhUl Tailer Park in said Officer V. Richard county police spokesman. Molloy said all three are club members. The sweep was the first major operation by a joint county and city police narcotics task force formed in January. In 11 search warrants were executed in Weems Creek and Molloy said. The task force took over an An- napolis police probe and began prep- arations for the raids about one month Molloy said City police began investigating the motorcycle club nearly two years ago. Little contraband was seized at locations in but one house in Pasadena yielded motorcy- cle parts and police said. Because only small amounts of drugs were seized in no arrests were made A few people were issued citations ordering them to report to Annapolis police head- quarters said Cpl. William city police spokesman. A total of 55 county and 16 city police officers participated in the Molloy said. Officers from both departments met at a.m. at city police headquarters on Taylor Avenue. The raids began about an hour later when wearing bulletproof vests and armed with be- gan breaking in doors at five loca- tions Communications were coordinated from a county police Winnebago parked at city police headquarters. The Iron who have a clubhouse in an industrial park at 1926 C Lincoln have been active for at least four years in police said. During that club members have been the focus of mostly from bar owners and manag- Powell said. There are about 40 active mem- bers of the based on police observations of the group's annual Toys for Tots drive last police said. This police were search- on Page Col. Save search team. Page 33. 100 DAYS Callahan not afraid to act By KEVIN DRAWBAUGH Staff Writer A box of lemon Jell-0 mix is encased in plastic and mounted on a stand on Mayor Dennis Callahan's desk. The box was a gag gift from election campaign opponents who labeled CaHahan Jell-0 They said pinning him down on an issue was like trying to nail Jell-0 to a tree. Callahan laughs at the joke today. But his former opponents are not laughing. be wondering how they could irii 't i i toe city ota seen 10Q days of tie Callahan administra- tion. the new mayor has proven to be anything but He is even reckless at aldermen. He A Kl A I VCIO attacked ANALYOIO has numerous sues and made some wholesale changes too many and too according to critics. He has demonstrated that he knows who and what he likes. And he has freely admitted that political loyalties help deter- mine who is and who is in the new City Hall. days I think it's Callahan said of his new job. nights I think I must be out of my Annapolis had a strong executive in former Mayor Richard L. Hillman and Callahan is another one But Hillman's management style was bureajcratic. Calla- han's is more direct. is a bureaucrat and Callahan is a small businessman. That's the differ- said Alderman Ruth R-Ward 4. Reflecting his background as an unfet- tered Callahan has acted too Photo by Bob Gilbert ENCASED like a the Jell-O box on Mayor Dennis Callahan's desk is a memento of the campaign. hastily on several aldermen said. In he created a new year public information officer post and hired Thomas W. Roskelly to fill the job without consulting the council. He also sacked and replaced three long- time city employees. And he called for the resignations of all five mem- bers of the Annapolis Housing Authority Board of Commissioners reminds me a little of a bull in a china said Alderman John R. Ham- R-Ward 1 Alderman Irving I-Ward find out how govern- ment works before we take out a knife and start whacking Mager and Mrs. Gray are the three aldermen who most often oppose the mayor on the council floor But even his most reliable Alderman Brad D-Ward said the mayor could be more cautious one weakness Dennis has is impetu- ousness When Dennis gets the idea that something should be his inclination is to do Davidson said Callahan backtracked on the Roskelly issue To appease he took the appointment before the council for approv- al on Page Col. A new order Aldermen form shaky alliances By KEVIN DRAWBAUGH Staff Writer Nobody on the City Council goes to the Mr. Donut in Parole for coffee after meetings anymore. The old camaraderie just is not veteran aldermen said But neither are the old boys of the 1981-85 council. In their place is a group so diverse and opinionated it's hard to imagine them swapping Tofces over-three glazed and coHee those orange booths. After 100 days in the eight aldermen Mayor Deonia Callaaao are not yet para- lyzed by their differences. But they have not developed wortttog either. a very Quixotic council and its person- ality seems to change with the issues It does seem to be less friendly and less happy than the old said Alderman Brad D-Ward a second-term veteran. The reason for the apparent strife may be that the members are so different that each is made happy by different suggested Alderman Terrie R-Ward a fresh- man. neatest thing about this council is that there's such a variance of backgrounds. John Hammond is the money man. Carl Snowden is the social conscience. Ruth Gray has a tremen- dous background in worn ens' issues. may be why it seems like we clash a because the convictions of each alderman run she said. culturally and the 1985-89 council covers a wide spectrum. Its members include a an insurance an a retired government a legislative a civil rights a sports a property manager and a stockbroker They come from Glen New York and Oregon. They include on Page Col. Flop-py Computers won't replace teacher Editor's note Capital Staff Writer Jtcqitttioe Tenets volunteers week- ly ft t tet cher's aide at Eistport Elementary School Class Notes is an series recounting her Mv. WITH daughter of Mr. and of Mr. i By JACQUELINE TENCZA Staff Writer Kids love using computers m but sometimes the new tech- oology can cause more problems than it solves Takr for example. Kathenne Har mint social studies class Even-thing went smoothly for the first minutes while I worked with four Eastport Elementary School took at a personal computer answering geography about different states If they answered a snail car would cruise along the out of the and into a new one But after the fifth the car stalled The program would oot ProjTwi onto the next hit return antwemJ the question afaia Nothing So we called for Mrs. Harafeta. Sat. was unsuccessful at get- of she popped in a different and we moved onto a new program everything went smoothly for about five minutes But then we hit toe same problem As toon as we got a third program it was time for toother group to use the computer I was pretty frustrated Although some computers are the greatest thing since the ballpoint they a number of problem for And teach- many teacberi are still not fuUy comfortable with computers. Desvita traiataf by the school sys- teaeaers who use computers infrequently find them awkward there still isn't enough quality software available Mrs. Harmina said there was lim- ited software on westward expan- the topic she had been covering She has been more suc- in finding software for other classes would be nice if we could take our material to someone aod have a program made up on exactly what we're Harmina said. And then there are times when the software U just too complex for the students the program is too complicat- the kids cao't get through Harmina said what I found with the sec- ond program we It required students to type ia the answer If the word was misspelled or a proper name was not the com outer said the answer was wrong It wasted time aad discouraged the who art just learaiftf to much less master a compvt er keyboard. Aaothw probiea is watt the rest of the daaa wfB do waste ea Cat.   

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