Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Annapolis Capital: Thursday, March 13, 1986 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Capital, The (Newspaper) - March 13, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Deer lovers sue DNR to get 'babies' back just want my babies back. I'll do whatever I can to get them Sharon Wieland By JOANNA RAMEY Staff Writer Walter and Sharon Wieland want Jezel and Lady back. The Hanover couple yesterday filed a lawsuit to force the return of their two pet deer taken from them last month by state wildlife officials enforcing rabies and game laws The Wielands adopted the deer last June after the newborn fawns were injured by a hay baler Jezel's scalp was lacerated and Lady's left leg was cut to the leaving her permanently crippled. am their Mrs. Wie- land said of the deer she has doctored and coddled. have the run of the But the Wielands have run afoul of state laws that prevent them from owning deer not bred in cap- tivity The couple was charged with harboring game animals without a license Wildlife officials with the state Department of Natural Re- sources tranquilized and removed the deer Jezel and Lady are being kept at an undisclosed getting ac- climated to a natural said Assistant Attorney General Pa- mela Andersen But whether they will be released into the or possibly will not be decided until the lawsuit is she said untrainmg them to be around Ms. Andersen said. don't think wild animals belong in a The deer were taken from the Wielands because state law prohib- its owning wild Ms. Ander- sen said The law is designed to protect both animals and she said animals belong to the peo- ple and the department natural holds them in she said Only in certain circum- stances can breeders own wild ani- mals. animals are wild animals and the law says you can't keep them said Dr. Torrey C. DNR secretary. An underlying concern is Ms Andersen said. She said the deer were allowed to roam with the Wielands' dogs and other posing a potential breeding ground for the disease. on Page Col. Tomorrow's Gray wet For see page 9. VOL. Cl NO. 61 MARCH 25 DONT FORGET THE ANNE ARUNDEL County Public Schools Area II Elementary String Festival will conclude with a free con- cert at tonight at Oak Hill Elementary School on Truck House Road in Severna Park. ANNE ARUNDEL General Hospital could be leaving its Franklin Street facility Page 29. SEVERNA PARK BEGINNING TODAY The Capital launches its weekly page devoted to Severna Park Page 37. LIVING LOSING YOUR job can be a real jolt to your system Page 13. STATE MELLON BANK'S proposal to buy a bankrupt Maryland is creating a stir Page 4 FERDINAND MARCOS has cost the United States nearly since his arrival at a U.S. Air Force base Page 2 SPORTS NAVY is gearing up for its game tomorrow in the NCAA tournament Page 19 PEOPLE A FEDERAL arrest warrant has been issued for the 23- year-old daughter of the late actor Peter one of six people accused of participating in an international cocaine ring that used violence to ob- tain cocaine and collect drug debts Victoria an actress and model featured in a nude photo layout in the April issue of Pltyboy re maioed at large yesterday af- ter her roommate and four other California residents were indicted here by a federal grand jury. For a look at other people in the news today. ptge 3 LOTTERY Numbers drawn yesterday Three-digit Pick 4 SMS INDEX 5 M pages Calendar Classified Cofttfes. cotnaMi Grtscword Edftertals 11 Per fee Hoard Obituaries PotteeBeat Sports Mstfcifs 17 JUST 'MARVELOUS _ .f- Aaron Weidle have enjoyed the maffhnvelotis touch of epring-Hke weather recently by playing a game of tug-of-war outdoors. But the fr-yeer-oft eon of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce ot will have to prepare wet weather rest of the week. For the weekend Pro-life Redistricting plan unveiled 80 Broadneck Elementary students to be relocated By JACQUELINE TENCZA Staff Writer When presented with the alternative of busing their children across the Severn parents from overcrowded Broadneqk Ele- mentary School favor moving 80 of their youngsters to Arnold Elementary School in- stead A school redistricting proposal was unveiled by school officials last night before about 100 parents at Broadneck Elementary The plan calls for a temporary solution to the space crunch there 40 special education students from Arnold Elementary School would be moved to a school that has yet to be said Vincent 0 Leggett county school supervisor of planning and student demographics. Then boundary lines would be redrawn to move 50 Broadneck Elementary students liv- ing in the College Manor development and 30 students from the Ramtree development to Arnold Elementary School This plan is contingent on finding a location for the special education Leggett said He said that it is best to move special education classes in pairs If two classes are Arnold Ele- mentary will have room for 50 additional students If all special education classes are moved from there the school could accommo- date 100 more students. education classes require more space than conventional Right all Broadneck Peninsula elemen- tary schools except Arnold Elementary have reached the county's designated capacity The state has a higher designated capacity for the schools a line here and there is not going to solve the Leggett said The pennmsula needs a new he told parents The snag is that there are two new elemen- on Page Col. f too much for Page 29. bill backed Few speak on death penalty By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Pro-life forces packed a Senate hearing room yesterday in support of a bill requiring parental notification when minors seek abor- tions. But when the same committee heard testi- mony on a proposal to abolish the death penalty for only the representative from the Maryland Catholic Conference remained from the original group. is it there is no one from those other groups who are not here to take a position OB tilings like Sen. Gerald W. D- asked Richard J. executive director of Maryland Catholic Conference. who testified before the Judicial Proceedings Committee in support of both said he had tried to gather support could. pick the room wHt church but t don't think you Dowling said. have altUtese groups called the Family law the Right to Life and Con- cerned Women for and it just seems that people concerned with children and life would be more concerned with some of these other Winegrad said after the hearing. who is vice chairman of the Governor's Task Force on Child Abuse and said he had never seen any of the anti- abortion advocates lobbying for measures to prevent child abuse Sen. William said he sponsored the bill which requires parental notification for minors 16 and younger seeking because an assistant attor- ney general concluded the current law is unconstitutional. The attorney general's opinion does not affect the status of the current which allows doctors to perform abortions on minors without parental notification if the doctor feels it may lead to physical or emotional abuse of the girl on Page Col. Senators hah chopper plan. Page 4. f Elderly shelter shortage called crisis By CHRISTINE NEUBERGER Staff Writer Nita Maggio gets two calls every day for most of them from frail elderly residents no longer able to live alone I have nowhere to refer Mrs director of the county Department of told the County Council last night hands are tied Calling the lack of local housing for elderly a Mrs Maggio and eight others urged passage of a bill to make group homes legal in Anne Arundel County The ordinance proposed by the county Office of Planning and would also give county gov- ernment authority to regulate group homes. Passage of the measure appears but the council postponed a vote on it last night in order to amend it Monday Under the group homes are defined as residential operations licensed to house a group of unrc at- ed residents Among the facilities that the law would make legal are foster family or group-care life- care communities and sheltered bousing. Although the homes could be li ceased to house the the minors or most speakers lamented the dearth of bousing for senior citizens Several speakers bemoaned how they had made a futile search for shelter to bouse their elderly parents who were still too independent to require a nursing home bat who needed some attention consider this a crisis in this said Jane a visiting nurse who lives in Severna Park Mrs Maggio testified that about 10 people have approached her about opening their own shelters for sen- iors But such shelters are now and until this bill becomes Mrs Maggio said the county cannot take advantage of available state grants for sheltered housing No one testified in opposition to the legislation Annapolis attorney Ben- nett Grain expressed concern that a life-care community for the proposed for a site near the South River by a firm he does not conform to the bill Annapolis Life Care Co plans to build a million life-care develop- ment of 246 apartments and 44 nurs- ta Page CoL 0' GREEN Drunk-meters dual-carding to begin i j By BOB MITCHELL Staff Writer When it comes to drinking and driving on St Pttnck's local officials don't want people to count on the luck of the Inth In a reprise of the county's distri- bution of alcohol information kits prior to the Christmas the city and county said yesterday they wffl Join forces to de tike ume thing March 17. Amatols Mayor Denis and Cevtty Bxeevtfre 0. James UgMkjMr CttyD.de They also announced that Annapo- lis will be the cite of a pilot program to encourage liquor to re- quest two Identification cards from customers The alcohol-detection will be available beginning tomorrow at the 13 county libraries and Annapolis Parti and Recreation Department St Mary's Street The MU are free to county residents 21 vears oM aedotder Called CRASH for Create Alcohol Serving tfce plastic tags conUia a hatd-Hetd jgDin Mood-alcofcet eat tent aad tfteratwe about the effects of alcohol To use the alcohol drinkers must break a glass ampule aod then blow into the 3-inch tube If at least some of the crystals turn the person is alcohol-im- paired The new kits cost the county about to assemble The alcoaot detectors differ from die oees the county distributed dur- tag the Christ mi I helidays. said prie coordinator of tbe conn ea Past It. CeL s' UADO't Page 4. COUNTY AMD cHy are offering drtofcen   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication