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Annapolis Capital: Saturday, February 15, 1986 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - February 15, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               J House passes ban on 'obscene' records M. Tae Bout of Delegates voted yes- terday to ban the safe to minors of Baikal recordings deemed a move proponents said would pro- tect children from a form of ehUd you throw some of this slime at it's said Del. Joseph chairman of the Judiciary Commit- tee. j is probably the worst kind of child abuse in the In a 9641 House ap- Hljwt _ W _ LI' proved and sent the legislation to the where it may face opposition. All 12 Anne Arundel County dele- gates present yesterday voted for the although Del. Charles D-Glen Bur- first voted against the measure. Kolodziejski said he changed his vote after Owens said obscene rock lyrics were a form of child abuse. thought it might be in the best interest to keep this away from children. It might help the Kolodziejski said. Del. William was reportedly taking care of some unfinished legal work. who took office after the session is a lawyer. whose committee had ap- proved the bill by a one-vote agreed with opponents that the pro- posed law would not end children's exposure to allegedly obscene music. The committee chairman said the legislation would not affect what music is played on radio and televi- sion. But Owens said be still believed Maryland should extend coverage of the present law that prohibits ttte sale of obscene magazines and other materials to anyone nnder-18. Opponents said the legislation would be and would place an unreasonable burden on who would have difficulty knowing-what sales are legal. know what they've got. They know what they're countered Owens. The recording industry last No- vember'agreed to place warning labels or print lyrics on album cov- ers to aid parents who want to know if their children are buying songs with explicit references to sex or violence. The record companies will decide for themselves what constitute references. Del. Theodore D-Baltimore complained that the Judi- ciary Committee had not even lis- tened to any allegedly obscene records. Owens said it wasn't necessary. think most of the people knew what we were talking he said. records are not put out as being very nke records and some- thing that will improve your he said. The sponsor of the Del. Judith on Page CeL lists background clucks Mbd. 4. Tomorrow's forecast melting For see 11. VQLCiNO.38 FEBRUARY 25Ctntf Purge falters fr i PONT FORGET Treat your Valentine to a a a musical or a dance this weekend. For see page 22. HOME OF THE WEEK Young couples have often found that the big thrill at owning a first home is usually by a wipunt President Ferdi- nand E. Marcos took an beatable lead yesterday in vote counting. Presidential investigators examined Ckaiieager's launch pad and wreckage yesterday. PageS. SPORTS Maryland star Len Bias and two other Terps have been suspended for violating cur- tev.PigtlS. PEOPLE A group protesting war toys made a tactical withdrawal from Sylvester StaBeoe's home after bring squirted with water wkfie trying to deliver a SO- foottigh valentine. Jerry leader of the LJL War Toys said about 25 members of his group had gathered outside the ac- tor's Pacific Palisades home Thursday night to deliver the card protesting which include an action figure dofl. Someone squirted the group with water from over the fence of the Rubin said. A voice through the front gate's intercom told them to go away Stallone's Paul said yesterday that SUDooe was of town on btthoaeymoofl dida't even about tie deaoastra- Per a look at etfcer people to mmml LOTTERY Humbert drawn TbrenUgtt-Wi IMDCX Housing board angers mayor By KEVIN DRAWBAUGH Staff Writer Mayor Dennis Callahan tried to grab control of the maverick Annap- olis Housing Authority yesterday by demanding the resignations of all five members of its board of com- missioners. Angered by the refusal of board Chairman Bertina Nick to brief him on a recent Callahan is a classic example of the problem we with the housing authority. been a little kingdom built over there that feels it's not answerable to anybody. This is ab- surd. is the mayor's board and the chairman's saying she's not at liber- ty to tell the mayor what went on tiie he said. .of the commissioners wiH said the Rev. Winslow D. a board mayor had no right whatsoever to ask for exactly said. Mm J8ck refused ft comment. Callahan's demands pit the power of City Hall against five veteran board members and Arthur 6. Stris- sel housing authority executive director since 1973. Largely through federal the authority has built and now manages 10 large public housing projects throughout the city. Approx- imately one of every six homes in Annapolis is in a public housing project Long accustomed to operating with little or no interference from past some board members defied Callahan's challenge. According to state housing authority board members are ap- pointed by the mayor and may be removed by him if they are found guilty of or neglect of duty or misconduct in Callahan has not leveled such charges against the board members. He said he asked for their resigna- tions because some of them have become too aloof from the problems of public housing tenants. see a real crisis developing in the public housing community And the entire bousing organization has lost its he said. The mayor's which the Rev. Shaw called was prompted largely by controversy at the Robinwood bousing project at Forest Drive and Tyler Avenue. The housing authority is in the midst of a 15 million renovation of M Page It 1 A t Warm thoughts PtmMbyBobOHMrt Leaving work yesterday afternoon in a swirling Delmus Thompson of Harwood walks fay a sign at the Stidham Tire Co. on Old Solomons Island Rdad' that probably echoes his sentiment. Forecasters predicted three to fhre-Hlpnes of snow would fall by this morning. A traveler's advisory was in effect last night as police reported numerous fender-benders. Suspect Tylenol found Maryland sends bottles for tests By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BALTIMORE Maryland officials have turned over 13 bottles of Tylenol capsules to the Food and Drug Administration to be checked for traces of but the state has not banned sale of the a spokeswoman for the state health department said yesterday. Lynn Brufiey-Doyle said that state and federal officials met yesterday and decided against a ban but urged retailers to voluntarily remove the capsules fronv their shelves. The department also warned residents who may have the capsules of regular or Extra- Strength Tylenol in homes not to take the medication. There has been no indication of problems with Tylenol liquid or Ms. Bruffey-Doyk f r the safe sfce said. department tonUrcv 1 Maryland rttierf ww cenflrtaed ia New Ydrfc 'Tbe cyanide in both bottles was chemically todkst- ing it came fifen a single Dr. frank commissioner of the federal Food and Drug told Morning yesterday. The second bottle came from the shelves of a Woolworth's store in the New York City suburb of about two Mocks from an stow that was the source of tainted capsules by Diane who died last authori- ties said. Two batches of the Tyleael capssJsrew tested for possible ronUmfautton. Brufley. CaL Paca museum funds sought By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Historic Annapolis Inc. is seeking a million grant from the state to build a museum adjacent to the Paca Gardens. The tentatively called Preservation would house exhibits and a lecture room for public programs on local culture and according to a report presented to the Anne Arundel Coun- ty House delegation yesterday. The name refers to the Castle Keep of historic a structure buiK to protect and preserve the castle and its treasures The delegation delayed action on the request until they discuss priori- ties for The Capital project requests for fiscal 1987. Del. Robert R-Davidson- said it is too early to tell whether there will be enough special projects or money for the grant. Neall serves on the Appro- priations Committee that oversees the state budget. got about million in requests and the governor has used up all the be said. in a difficult situation where to give a dollar we have to take a dollar away front semeoue else. If it were a- looser year aid we had a and a half dollars lying the museum might be a high In this election the request for the museum is competing with other such money for St. John's increased aid to school construction and special projects statewide. an election you have the most competition for The Capital NeaH said. AD 181 legislators are ending the last year of their four-year terms and are anxious to show their con- stituents that they can home the local projects A fact sheet on the project mates that design and construction will cost and interior ex- bibits would cost another Fund-raising for the bttfldmg be. gan in August 1985 and Historic Annapolis Inc. has raised according to the fact sheet The IVt-story building would be located at the comer of King George and Martin streets. Historic Annapolis Inc has set 1900 as a target date for opening the museum. Planning began in 1971 with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities DtbgttM btckjttdgi. TRASHED Vandals wreck eight homes By DAN Staff Writer A pair of Pdgewater whom county polirr have dubbed the BirvdiU wvre caught red handed an broke into and wrecked houses IB London Thursday morning caoeatf at least in rcmty potk-e saki The bvyt who art M 15 years old broke ttgkt beasts on KooxvtUe aad br fore 10 a Thursday Polkce they smattMd TVs aad ottter appli- sliced oil paiatiafs with peacbsd btlai ii aad comasmededker actsisldettnictiofi PeUee caught eaa at yooths at tt ipHl bMM kids are unbelievable. It was absolutely this random-type e rrfhrer gathering evidence brtiiwl another vmdaiized house saw both yoitbi enter the Carr which was down the OOcers to tbeCa bedroom older youth slipped out t kitchen door and es caped during a bkx-k chase on foot He irrnted at home Thursday afternoon In a pirked outode officers confiscated a 157 raliber re volver youth allegedly carried tht bvrglariet Police U youthi tweaue aUU law forbtdi releastni titc lumat tncpect hive niles Bota ire stWewta at South River High School They coaiailUed the Ovrflaries while playing police said raiftpage through the BormaUy quiet was only the latest in a series of stanfiar   

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