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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: February 11, 1986 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - February 11, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Class.ded 268-7000 npital Tomorrow's cold For see page 11. VOL Cl NO. 35 FEBRUARY 1986 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET a multimedia presentation on the experi- ences of black servicemen in will be given at tonight in the Center for Per- forming Arts at Anne Arundel Community College. Admis- sion is charged. AREA Anne Arundel General and North Arundel hospitals will not have to lose any beds this year. Page 33. TALK OF THE TOWN Those and signs don't mean it. Page 33. BUSINESS UNC Resources moves its national offices here. Page 13. REVIEW Saturday evening's Annapo- lis Symphony Orchestra con- cert at Maryland Hall featured Ransom virtuoso flu- tist and guest conductor. Page 29. ENTERTAINMENT Gospel music is coming to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Page 31. STATE Maryland's AAA bond rating remains intact. Page 4. Jewish dissident Anatoly Shcharansky walked to free- dom today after nearly nine years of captivity in Soviet prisons and labor camps. Page 2. A commission investigating the explosion of the space shut- tle Challenger is resuming public hearings. Page 3. SPORTS St. John's center Walter Ber- ry played but he made Georgetown feel the pain. Page 21. PEOPLE Singer Kenny Rogers will have to cancel all 16 concerts scheduled through most of March because his is undergo- ing surgery to remove a cyst on his vocal his publicist says Rogers said yester- day the sur- gery isj see this as a really positive chance to take care of a problem I've had for a long time His recuperation will take up to six forcing the can- said publicist Wen- dy Ferris he still plans to be host of the my Award on Feb 25 I obey the I may be OK for Rogers said at a news adding that the condition was an occupational hazard that confronts professional singers a lot like football play- ers with busted knees and so be said have nodules and polyps on their throats I've had this for prob- ably eight or 10 years For a look at other people in the news see ptge 3 LOTTERY Numbers drawn yesterday Three-digit 111 Pick 4 J5tt INDEX 4 40 pages Calendar Ads Coukt. columns CroMvord Sprti 13-20 8 M-M M 10 2M1 11 11 zi-a 11 County snowed under Cars schools closed By JUDI PERLMAN Staff Writer Tow truck operator Roy Wright was busy pulling cars out of parking spaces this morning as ice and snow coated the ground had 12 to 15 calls this the Annapolis Amoco employee said at 8 a.m. it keeps I won't be able to get to all of them today. lot of the cars are in apartment parking lots trying to get onto the main streets. They're just spinning their Wright said. Snow began falling in the region during the early morning wreaking havoc on rush hour and prompting 12 schools systems in Maryland to close for the day. Anne Arundel County schools closed foi the second time in a week while St. John's College in Annapolis remained open. Day- time classes at Anne Arundel Community College were canceled but evening classes were not. County police reported 21 traffic accidents and 25 disabled vehicles between 6 and 9 a.m. Most of the accidents were in the northern and western sections of the said Officer V. Richard county police spokesman. really not that bad. It's a whole lot easier to cope with the snow than it is the Molloy said. Most of the accidents were fender-bend- ers. About eight involved injuries but noue were said Lt. Robert coun- Pholo by Keith MICHAEL GROSS clears a path to the steps of the State House early this morning. About an inch of snow fell here. ty fire department spokesman National Weather Service forecasters at Baltimore-Washington International Airport predicted the moving up from Geor- would leave from 2 to 4 inches of snow on various parts of the state before tapering off this afternoon. At 3 a.m snow was falling at the rate of about an inch an forecasters said. In other parts of the a storm stretching from Texas into New York blan- keted highways with ice and up to 8 inches of causing hundreds of fender-benders and closings as a surge of arctic air in a deep freeze In roads were covered with and state police urged motorists to drive carefully Leonard spokesman for the state highway maintenance said crews worked through the night applying chemicals and plowing roads. Road conditions throughout the state gen- erally were but they were passa- Polomski said County road workers remained on alert throughout the night and one shift worked overtime to salt the said William chief of county road operations Wilson southern district road super predicted that his department would spread more sand and salt today than it has all year. So the county has spent less money on snow removal this year than the past five Baldwin said Outside equipment has not been called in yet this winter. When conditions become road workers have dumped extra sand for which is considerably less expen- sive than he said far there has not been much snow. But we will worry until Easter We could still have a Baldwin said List of cancellations. Page 12. Officials hit home- teaching proposal By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer County school officials say a bill that would ease the requirements for at-home teaching contradicts educa- tion standards. The bill sponsored by Del. John would allow virtually any parent or guardian to teach their children at home. think it flies in the face of everything we've tried to do in this this state and nationally in Party rivalry Aldermen butting heads By KEVIN DRAWBAUGH Staff Writer Republican Alderman John R Hammond attacked the City Coun- cil's new Democratic garnson four times last night Four times he was driven Sometimes allied with others and sometimes Hammond was beaten on votes that may have dem onstrated much about the power structure of the new council which will be 75 days old Most the council de- feated by 5-4 a bill sponsored R-Ward which would would limited Mayor Donnn Callaban's power to make appoint menu to city boards and commis sionj The mayor called the bill lately unnecessary Agreeing with him were four increasingly reliable allies Aldermen Brad Davidson of Ward Alfred A Hopkins of Ward Samuel Gtlroer of Ward 3 and Ctrl 0 Soowden of Ward 5 all Oppodaf the mayor and backing BtmoiMd on the largely procedural biD vert Aldermen Ruth Gray of Wtrtf 4 Ttrric DeGrtff of Ward botk and Irving Mftfv of Ward i COOMTV. establishing some standards for edu- cational said C Berry Car- deputy superintendent of Anne ArundeJ County schools Gary said he has become con- vinced that parents who want to teach their children at home are as dedicated and can provide as if not education than public or private schools nothing I hope this will dispell the notion that home school ers are a bunch of Gary said Under the a parent or guardi- an must notify the public school system within 30 days of beginning home instruction The home instructor would then be required to keep a portfolio of the child's materials and attend ance which public school officials could inspect after giving 15 days written notice The bill further requires annual evaluations of students taught at home The evaluations would be submitted to the school supenntne dent for review If the superintendent found the child was not working up to his the in-home instructor would have a to remedy the situation The House Constitutional and Ad mimstrative Law Committee has scheduled a public hearing on the bill for Feb 19 Carter said he intends to get the county Board of Education to take a position on the bill before the hear ing The school administration is Mivw The time Democrat-Republican vote M to the of t TRACY COLLERAN volunteers as Lloyd White demonstrates a polygraph test A retired state trooper he has ma-de a second career out of working for defense attorneys Make money legally By JOANNA RAMM Staff Writer If the fabled Pied Piprr a be woulri have at heels a flock of expert witoentti. crowd of court re porteri and a stable of title searchers There would be appraisers and lie detector operators as wp.l as doctori tod engineers litter through lawsuits or land tfcett professionals hive ctnred oat a nkbe to Arun del Cottatjr'i tef al industry Court spurs own industry Take Daniel Lucrak taip of the woman cockroaches her cheese spread The case is a small example of bow lawyers have turned to Luc 7ak s Annapolis based firm Fo rensic Technologies International Corp for expert help The company employs engi aho hirrri frrirr car accident tn dams that spring ipaks For an hour thev ran find what and who might responsible for snafu Luczak said In the roach case the frm was asked by an tri examine the cheese spread to see whether it wortrrV of a lawsjit Their finding The roaches were added to the jar after it opened What we had was a plaintiff OB ftff 12. Col opposing the bill Following state Board of Educatin the county board in 1984 established a policy for allowing at- home instruction by parents and guardians The county regulations require the instructor to be a certified teacher or a college graduate with a back- ground in the subjects taught at home The superintendent may on Page Col. Burger boost fcMcMasters' fill job void BOB MITCHELL Staff Writer Big Uncle the state and county are teaming up to give senior citizens a break a chance to return to the work force The announced yesterday that it has received a J23 400 job training grant to teach 40 low-mcome senior citizens to work at five area McDonald's restaurants The training known as the 'Me Masters program be funded a federal job training grant Thf training program was un at a npws conference held at the McDonald s restaurant on Route in C ape St daire attended ounu Fxr-cutiveO James Lighthu cr Rrpnt Johnson of the Department of Employment and Rosaue Abrams director of the state Office on Aging 4nnp Arundpi and Baltimore coun ties arp the first in the state to participate in the pxpenmental pro Under the program eight senior citizens will be trained every month during the next five said Nita Majtgio director of the county Department of Aging State and company officuli which is being launched to will both pro- vide an extra source of income for M Page Cot.   

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