Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Annapolis Capital: Saturday, February 1, 1986 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Capital, The (Newspaper) - February 1, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Classified 268-7000 Circulation 268-4800 Capital Tomorrow's Milder For page 9. VOL L f FEBRUARY 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET The Naval Academy 'Band Brass Quintet will present a free concert at 2 p.m. tomor- row at the Crofton 1657 Crofton Centre. HOME OF THE WEEK The Sidwells' Broadview home ii a reproduction of a home built in 1781. Page 23. ENTERTAINMENT starring Anthony is still as heartwarming as ever. Page 19. STATE For the third consecutive a Senate committee has killed legislation that would curb campaign contributions by political action committees. The Reagan administration's erroneous report about the fall from power of Haiti's Jean- Claude Duvalier led to a riot in that nation yesterday. Page 2. Sales of new homes jumped 7.5 percent last year to their highest level since 1979 as the average price of a new home topped for the first Page 3. SPOUTS Scott replacing the injured Kevin scores 24 points as the Boston Celtics beat the Washington Bullets 97- 88 for their 10th straight win. Page 12. PEOPLE California congress worn an Bobbl Fiedler will marry her top aide the same man who was indicted with her last the aide said yesterday. had always planned that after the e4ec tion we'd do the I right ______ the Clarke. guess shell make an honest man out of who is running for the and were indicted last charged with violating a Cali- fornia campaign law. They al- legedly offered to pay off the campaign debt of rival candidate Ed Davis if be would agree to drop out of the race. She and Davis are running toehaBenfe taewnbent Demo- crat Alan Crasjttm The ari- Janet. nedJer has called the eharfes agaiwt her a at other people in the aef LOTTERY drawn Matters tfni three digit- Pkft4-iHL tHDCX 4 44 pages. REMEMBERING 'SMITTY' COMMANDANT OF Midshipmen Stephen K. Chadwlck and his wife Maureen pray in Naval Academy chapel yesterday prior to memorial service. Academy mourns astronaut By LORRAINE AHEARN Staff Writer After more than mourners filed out of the Naval Academy Chapel yes- terday a small group of friends lingered fiear the altar in an all- too-famflfar ritual for the men in the class of '91. When Commander Michael J. Smith died piloting his first space shuttle mission he became the 45th man his classmates would mourn. just one who joins the said 1987 class president Cmmdr. David Church. But the midshipman they called who they say used to sneak off the academy grounds to take J-3 trainer aircraft up at Lee had left them his share of memories. smite he had when he walked out of the mobile van to the ready room imik be. had 20 former Navy lieutenant who was in the 35th Company with don't re- member everyone you went to school with. He was a prettjMpecial Smith's death at the age of 40 left Cmmdr. William McCracken as the only surviving member of a trio of ambitious young fliers in what was then the academy's new aerospace which HcCracken today heads. McCracken was watching from the stands at Cape Canaveral Tuesday when the space shuttle Challenger exploded after UBrag all seven crew mem- ft wanrHay like the one in 1968 his awl Smith's iriead Johii Har- rington was killed in a crash hi where Harrington was going through test pilot school. Yesterday morning McCracken was back at the academy and teaching class. Facing a room full of first classmen on Page CoL Related stories. Page 2. County bay rules expected Fate of state bill said irrelevant By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Anne Arundel County intends to abide by criteria to protect the Chesapeake Bay regardless of legislative according to F. Beck head of the county Office of Planning and Zoning. But the main legislative battle over guidelines for development on the bay shoreline will likely be over the density requirement lor the natural resource conservation areas areas that are primarily farm- land and forests. don't think anyone here thought we were going to control density and said Del. Thomas D-Prince Frederick. going to support it critical areas but I have some problems with the 20 The criteria developed tniRK trie by the Critical Areas Com- COUCltidS mission calls for one hous- ing unit per 20 acres in the SnOUiu KFIOW source conservation we are SOffOUS The General Assembly HbOUt Sen. Gerald W. Wlnegrad resource areas. this year must either ap- prove or reject the criteria with a resolution. If the resolution is ap-___ local governments will have two years to de- vise their own development criteria. plans based on the Eastern Shore legislators have opposed the calling the guidelines a policy. Already they have filed about a dozen bills aimed at diluting the criteria. Sen. w. one the legislature's most ardent has filed a bill that would cut off state funds for counties thai do not comply with the critical areas criteria. don't want the state to be paying for the growth of a county that does not abide by the criteria of the Critical Areas Wfnegrad said. Once the criteria is any county4hat does not comply would be denied all state funds and federal funds tunneled through the state that subsidize growth- related services. That would include school construc- road and bridge water supply and sewage on Page if. Col. Ohio-centered earthquake felt in state By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A strong earthquake near Cleve- land rumbled through nine states and part of Canada shat- tering sounding an alarm at an unfinished nuclear shutting off three coal-fired generators and slightly injuring two people. The U.S. Geological Survey in where the quake was also estimated that the a.m. EST tremors had a magnitude of 5.0 on the Richter scale of ground movement They were centered 30 miles northeast of Cleveland. been through tornadoes and but nothing like said Betty a bus driver for the Mentor public school in Ohio's Lake where two people were treated for cuts from flying glass and falling ceiling tiles. Emergency alarms were activated and employees were sent home at the Perry nuclear 35 miles east of but Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co. spokesman Lee Bailey said there was no struc- tural damage. Fuel rods on the site waiting to be loaded in reactors were not he said. Bailey said the earthquake knocked out a 650-megawatt genera- tor at the company's Eastiake coal- burning plant other gener- ators picked up the slack and no outages were reported. Two coal-fired generators at the Belle River power plant near Marine also shut down because the tremor triggered a safety device which detects excess said Carla spokeswoman for De- troit Edison Co. Electric service was not she said. The quake was felt in Pennsylvan- West New York and and as far north as Ontario. Ira Stohl- a City Council staff member in said the city gov- erment building two blocks from the White House shook. Geological Survey received numerous reports of tremors from and Baltimore but a spokeswoman said no calls had come la from the Chesapeake Bay area. Anne Arandel County police had not received any calls concerning the quake a spokesman The Richter scale is a measure of ground motion as recorded on seis- mographs. Every increase of one number means a tenfold increase in magnitude. An earthquake of 5 on the Richter scale can cause considerable dam-' age under some conditions. The San Francisco earthquake of which occurred before the Richter scale was has been on Page CoL Levitt's wife starts jail term By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BALTIMORE The wife of indicted savings and loan owner Jeffrey Levitt reported to the City JaQ here last night to begin serving a term for criminal con- one day after her husband was imprisoned for the same offense. Carol Levitt arrived at p.m. just five minutes before her deadline to begin the first of 15 consecutive weekends at the jail for violating a eourt order that limited the Levitts' personal frttHHnf to a Mrs. Levitt arrived in a chauffeur-driven black Volvo with her as more than a hatf-dosen city poUce officers and a crowd of reporton stood by The jaO warden she would be kept ia a single cell under protective WBAL-TV in Baltimore and that her lifestyle would be changing to As a women eateraf the 115- facility are marched upon arrival asdaiMd Quarters Ber husband Jeffrey the 43-year- aid former presMeot of tnsohwnt Court gaviafs sad Lean OB Ttarwtsy at lt-atoata eoatempt sea- a KAROL LEVITT yeetortfey evening el Beftlmofe City Jell. the largest financial fraud in Maryland's history A Baltimore circuit judge last fall placed cvts on the Levitu lavUb fpendttf habits to eaturc K the state's salt is sneeesi the vouid have some mousy left to Bay a jndfment Levitt it also clurfed criminally with the theft mtMpprapraUon of mfilioa ka dtpositon' reports dting state satt served on a state that rales oa feunate frier- Levitt to fill an unexpired term on Innate Grievance and ia Jaiy 1472. MiDdtl appointed Levitt to a fun sear-year term on the commission The responsible for aetiaf on ftttd br state inmates officials or emplorees of the Division of Correcttee or the Patnxevt lavtittHioe ta Robert J who was then secretary for puebe safety and come- ttoeal wrote to requesting thai Levitt be removed resjtnatfoa or the records show. K the sesasHttto's Broker joins House race By BOB MITCHELL Staff Writer A Pasadena businesswoman yesterday announced she is seeking the Republican nomination for Congress from Maryland's 4th District. Judith A. an investment broker with Legg Mason Wood Walker said she entered the race for the U.S. House of Representatives because Congress needs more peo- ple with a business back- ground. think we need good business people down ia Ma. said. need lawyers we need a Tfas 4th District all of Anadel Cosnty and parts of Howard Prince George's comities A divorced mother of three Ma. Balent' has lived ia the area tor the past years and was grad- uated from the CoOege of Notre Dame of Marylajoi Tab b her bid tor elective office. She entered the race hseaaee she fett she would be efssetire to aoi becaost of tioa with state DtL Retort R. JUMTM sUUEMT i NetflliMtoM escorted ia Us bid far can eeafressleatl neoitoatioe by UA Martortt who is rettrsag frets the seat she has bsel saact 1171. iea't feel I'm nsaatef Bebty she sail nsanatf tar Uw KtotXh peatM   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication