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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: January 25, 1986 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - January 25, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               Cancer victim requires 'outside' help RUTH LEVITT fighting cancer By SCOTT LAUTENSCHLAGER Staff Writer Ruth Levitt believes that fighting cancer is a family affair. And for Anne Arundel General Hospi- tal is a member of the family. just the type of hospital Anne Arundel Mrs. Levitt said. like a But because AAGH's capabilities do not extend to state-of-the-art cancer she was forced to turn to strangers at Johns Hopkins Hospital for help. The 54-year-old Mrs. Levitt knows she is lucky to have a top- flight facility like Johns Hopkins particularly because it spe- cializes in her disease colon cancer. But going to Baltimore for treat- ments meant traffic long waits at the hospital and the dis- pleasure of coping with illness in unfamiliar Mrs. Lev- itt said. all of a sudden go to a hospital outside was a very hard she said. Mrs. who along with her operates Chic Ruth's Delly in thinks her experience illustrates the need for improved cancer therapy in Anne Arundel County. definitely is a she said. means so much to know there is a place going up AAGH who say 650 peo- ple annually leave the county to receive cancer are plan- ning an million oncology center to fill the void in local services. The center is part of a proposed million expansion of which would be delivered out of new facilities on Jennifer Road near the Annapolis Mall A drive is under way to raise million for that project It will be least a before construction begins on the new AAGH spokeswoman Lisa Hillman said. At Johns Mrs. Levitt received radiation therapy on a linear accelerator and chemothera- a type of drug treatment. Both types of treatment already are available locally radiothera- py by doctors in Cape St. Claire and chemotherapy at AAGH. But in some such as Mrs. local capabilities are not sophisti- cated enough The AAGH oncology center increase the scope of the therapies we could said Dr. Stanley the Annapolis on- on Page 10. Col. Classifie Circulatii News-Busn HiJUiLLL IllOUf- j i_hS F U BOX lc c L MD LL'O t Tomorrow's Rain For see page 9. VOL Cl NO. 21 JANUARY 25 Cents '5 GOOD DON'T FORGET The Annapolis Heritage An- jjHques Show continues from 11 to 9 p.m. today and from U a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow at Medford Hudson and Willow streets. Admission is charged. HOME OF THE WEEK An 84-year-old house on Green Street was the answer to Nancy and David Shobe's dreams. Page 23. STATE Gov. Harry Hughes made it clear yesterday that he wiU accept no major changes in his plan for paying off depositors whose money is frozen in Old Court Savings and Loan Asso- ciation. Page 4. Filters from two American aircraft carriers conducted flight operations off the Libyan coast yesterday in what U.S. officials described as a tat TJavy exercise. Li- bya branded it an Page 2. The head of the U.S. Confer- ence of Mayors vowed yester- day to lead a drive to keep alive revenue sharing and oth- er aid to the nation's cities. PageS. SPORTS A Super Bowl bug benches the Patriots' Eason and the Bears' Butler. Page 11 PEOPLE Actor-singer Gordon Mac- who crooned in a surrey with the fringe on top in and later battled back the blackouts of yester- at age Edwin di- rector of de- Ivelopment 'and public relations at the said MacRae died at a.m. at Bryan Memorial Hospital in Neb. He had been hospitalised since Nov. 27 for treatment of cancer of the mouth and jaw. died very peacefully in MacRae's said in a telephone MacRae said that al- tboufh her husband suffered a stroke in IBB and doctors said be would never be able to work be kept performing of sheer guts aid For a look at other people in the fee ptge i LOTTERY Numbers drawn yesterday Three-digit 541 INDCX 4 suctions. 44 pages Calendar Oaastftol Ads columns 2S-43 If I a .a Can quest Soup labels aid schools By JACQUELINE TENCZA Staff Writer There are hundreds of cans in cupboards throughout the county. They've been carefully stripped of their labels all to benefit education. Many county public school stu- dents collect labels from Camp- bell's labels that eventually are redeemed for slide projectors and computer disk drives. The problem is that sometimes youngsters remove labels from unopened cans and forget to mark them. kind of just shake the cans at my noose and try to figure out what's said Donald principal of Belvedere Elementary School in Arnold. Similar to stamp programs of years schools receive a catal- og from Campbell's Hating a vari- ety of equipment and the number of labels required to boy each item. For an Apple HE computer with a disk drive and monitor costs while two playground balls go for 750 labels. Last schools re- ceived merchandise under the 13- year-old with the aver- age school collecting labels from November to March. Audio-visual and sports equip- ment are the most popular mer- said Denny director for the Campbell's Labels for Education program. Crofton Woods Elementary School has collected more than labels so said Mona Pnotooy Henson IN THE CAN floes dozens of labels collected by Crofton from HsiHcia daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mohaninwd Jeffrey son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard and Susan daughter of Mr. and Mf8. Paul Ralhhard. school media specialist Their labels for a computer disk drive and labels for a computer keyboard. Last the school collected Mrs. Mandley easily recalled. have a family that moved away and sent 65 labels back to she said. a real commu- nity This year she expects they will have enough labels for either the disk drive or keyboard. Some schools don't participate in the program because principals question whether it endorses Campbell's products. Former school Superintendent Edward J. Anderson discouraged the pro- principals say. The current Robert C. said fle has no problems with the program but thinks it should be run by PTAs or another similar organization. think educators have their hands full Rice said. Many Parent-Teacher Associa- tions have continued to collect labels. never said buy Camp- bell's Soup. We just say if you use the save the Smith said. He added that if another compa- ny offered school his school would collect their too. only equipment money we get is from the PTA and this is a way to supplement Smith said Maritime center set 106-acre Deale facility will include 625 slips By JUDI PERLMAN Sooth County Staff Writer A maritime explosion planned in Deale could make the community the largest boating center between Annapolis and Solomons Island. The owners of Herrington Harbour North Marina at the mouth of Rock- hold Creek have purchased an adja- cent marina to create a maritime complete with a shopping com- plex and a posh subdivision nearby. With the acquisition of Tracys Creek the 106-acre Herring- ton Harbour Maritime Park will have 625 boat with an addition- al 35 said E. Steuart Cha- president of Herrington Harbour Marinas. Chaney called the park most comprehensive maritime facility on the Chesapeake he and his partners will expand recreational activities at a resort marina further south that they own the 650-slip Herrington Harbour in Rose Haven making the entire Herring Bay area a major boating Chaney said. The idea for a maritime park stemmed from the growing needs of the boating Chaney said The number of boaters on the bay is increasing but slip and storage space is be said boat- ing shelters are becoming too crowd- creating a bigger need for boat especially for those who live in places where storage is prohibit- such as townhouses or apart- ments. The complex will provide dry stor- age for more than boats and offer a variety of maritime services such as yacht maintenance and re- MAPS SHOW site of Herrington Harbour Maritime Park. a sailing water boat rentals and clothing and gift shops. project will stimulate every form of retail services in the area by increasing tax revenues to the coun- ty and providing a wide range of additional employment opportunities to county Chancy said. on Page Col. Court clerk at odds By PAT RIVIERE Staff Writer Circuit Court judges and the clerk of court have squared off in a power struggle. At issue this election year is who controls the scheduling of Circuit Court civil cases. E. Aubrey clerk of asked the county legislative delegation to abolish appearance fees some to in county income annually because the clerk's office -is too busy to and account for the money. But Judge Raymond G. Thieroe circuit administrative asked the legislators to sponsor a bill that would create a new office funded with appearance fees that would be responsible for scheduling civil cases Appearance fees are part of the court costs paid by litigants. Thieme's backed by the county ad- would take the scheduling out of the clerk's and control The new signment would serve under the judges. Thieme told the legislators that the current system is but that the increasing caseload demands data on scheduling to support assignments. the cases are being and I have no Thieme said. court needs to take control of its own Last Prince George's County estab- lished a similar scheduling office under the court judges strenuously object to this to taking any part away from my CoUison said of Thieme's proposal whose four year terra expires this said be allows the judges a in scheduling and that the judges essentially have control now you say the judges pretty much run it I don't see why you would have any objection to this said Del Thomas D-Prince Frederick. the county should tell us if it's suggested Del. Elmer D Annapolis. In a letter dated Jan David A Ply assistant county said the bill was requested by Judge Thieme and county Administrative Judge Bruce Williams has the support of the county administration Plymyer reiterated the county's support yesterday morning to the delegation county administration supports Plymyer told the legislators. diverting appearance even paying salaries and operating the county should come up with a positive cash Collison said he felt Thieme's proposal would cost the county money He told the legislators that his plan was not just to counter the judges' plan. CoUison had tried unsuccessfully last year to get the delegation to join Montgomery County in abolishing the appearance fees. Although CoUison said handling the appear- ance fees is too much he said he has adequate staff to begin operating a computer that Thieme said could help provide the data to assure logical scheduling CoUison said it takes one person two weeks to handle some 500 appearance fees a month New mayor boosts police chiefs morale iy JEFF DAVIS Staff Writer The storm of IMS ripped through Annapolis leaving both win nen and losers Pobce Chief John C SchroHt u one of the rarrivon. Faced with controversy sod tur noil in department through araeh of list the tfekk-skiaaed exvMartM IBM a period to improve moMle on the force and rtlivkns wttli the pattk Setntttt is opttnistk aboat acttev- feaf those because the man be oftaa odds with tenner L. HOlsaaa was office oa Hactioo Day A... SOOK afftr of the tad the State's Attorney's Office conduct- ed s secret investigation. The which were never did not involve criminal but Schmrtt was ordered to change certain management practices. Some officers called for Schmitt'i but Hlttman ssM be couldn't fire him unless be violated the civil service code thatr worsened Mayor Dennis Ciilahaa has been ia eoatrol for eight weeks and Sehmttt sars be can aanaafr ase a change for better have a mayor in here now wbo t tttak b fotnf to be a peat benefit tor ettiMBS as wen as aiei saU i i styk said. T for a better year Schmitt's comments came before the release of a 120 page report compiled by a enforcement con- sultant which recommended sweep- ing in the department The consultant criticized much of the depirtiirMt'i management prac- and recommended a complete reorganization of the department who emphasised during the interview he htd not yet seen the consultant's s lack of commoakatioa within the depart- ment Bay bsve been the canse for the aDefations of morale and maa- afeaMWt probtoas To combat those Schsaitt has attempted to quash ru- mors by attending roD call to talk with ttMofflean art establish an fttat CaL think the main problem was a communication problem the What came out off my meetings never got down the chain of -JohnSchmJtt   

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