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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: January 23, 1986 - Page 1

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - January 23, 1986, Annapolis, Maryland                               1 Brides '86 weddings guide MD t Tomorrow's Sunny 309 For eon page 9. JANUARY 25 Cents GOOD PONT FORGET The planetarium Once in a will be shown at 7 and p.m. and at 7 and p.m. Satur- day in the Naval Academy Planetarium. For free reser- call 267-2907. AREA This year may be the last for federal block grants. Page 35. LIVING Home satellite dish owners are getting mixed signals. Page 11. FOR THE RECORD For a listing of property sales and other see page 33. BUSINESS How yon handle business trips and meals affects your tax liability. Page 20. ENTERTAINMENT John Patrick's Curious is a finely crafted revival. Page 36. and Old can still be fun. Page 36. DINING OUT Things changed it Fret's. Page 37. STATE Elderly depositors at four savings and loans where funds ait frozen will not pay tax penalties on IRA accounts. Page 4. NATION A fire in a New luxury hotel kills 38 people. Page 2. The EPA unveils rules to ban some asbestos products. Pages. FOOTBALL The two stars in the Super Bowl say it's just one more game. Page 23. BASKETBALL Navy will have to play well to beat Richmond. Page 23. PEOPLE cartoonist Bate is in satisfac- tory condition with a fractured spine after an ultralight air- craft carrying him and another man crashed. The which resem- bles a glider with an crashed yesterday north of Al- on an Indian said a dispatcher with the Bernalillo County sheriffs department Police on the Sandia Pueblo reservation refused to release any infor- mation about the accident Breathed was treated for a fractured spine at St Joseph Hospital fan Albaqnerqoe. featuring an amnesiac penguin named an incoherent cat named the disreputable Steve Dallas and other charac- appears in about TOO newspapers nationwide. LOTTERY Members drawn i 91 pafes. Calendar Ada 14 .6 .H44 jm ...jr Lawmakers debate options Swift payoffs unlikely Legislative leaders haven't yet abandoned efforts to revise Gov. Harry Hughes' savings and loan but they aren't very optimistic that they will be able to speed up payments to depositors at Old Court Savings and Loan Association. change will be and we are under an extremely difficult time House Speaker Benjamin Cardin told mem- bers of the House yesterday. Cardin's speech came just after delegates had heard an analysis prepared by their own fiscal staff of the governor's plan to resolve the savings and loan crisis. not overly optimistic that we are going to be able to make a change in the governor's he said. Senate President Melvin mean- was a little more hopeful than Cardin that changes can be made so that depositors will have more than one option. But he agreed with D-Baltimore that the plan can be changed can only with Hughes' blessing. Steinberg also said the governor acd Gener- al Assembly must present a united front when the state sells bonds next month so that the AAA bond rating will be retained. The analysis presented by William Hatch- Bidding process marred Building problem besets schools By JACQUELINE TENCZA Staff Writer Two school construction bids that were well above budget allocations were caused by a series of misunderstandings and oversights in the bidding school officials say. The problems have school board members concerned about their reputation in the build- ing community and have caused state and county officials to question the school system's expertise in the construction business. The problem started when the million allocated for the Southern Middle School renovation and addition was million less than the low bid. Two months the low bid to build an auditorium at Broadneck Senior High School was more than had been estimated. The County Council's reluctance to approve additional funds for the Southern Middle School shortfall and complications in the bidding prompted the school board to rebid both projects. Although school officials hope to bring in lower bids by hiring a consultant to search for cost savings and interviewing contractors to learn what items boosted they still anticipate shortfalls. are a number of reasons for the high Ronald L. assistant super- intendeot for school support toM the school board. a building boom in the county is resulting in higher and less competitive bid- ding. Then the school system must estimate a project's cost using a state formula to qualify for Maryland money. formula is not sensitive to market said Richard C. school director of planning and construction. cost estimates are made as long as two years before bids are secured. Bat state officials maintain that some of tUs reasoning doesn't bold op. formula includes an inflation said Yale executive director of the the General Assembly's chief fiscal did not differ significantly from the estimate given bv Hughes when he submitted his plan two weeks ago. Ratchford estimated the cost of the gover- nor's plan at million to million not including any money the state may recov- er from the civil lawsuits it is pursuing against owners and officers of troubled savings and loan associations. Hughes placed the cost at but said he is confident that at least million will be collected from those responsi- ble for the savings and loan problems. Del Robert said he believes Ratchford's range of potential costs is more realistic than the governor's plan. But Neall said he does not feel the gover- nor's plan will change significantly because of the renewed triple-A bond rating. concern is that we make sure we do not underestimate the size of the he said. Del. Tyras said the most appealing alternative to him is selling deposits in the 11 remaining troubled thrifts to Mary- land banks that are willing to buy them. public is not concerned about getting their money per se. They just want to make IRS GRABS LEVITTS' LUXURY CAR By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BALTIMORE Internal Revenue Service agents yesterday seized an expensive Ger- man-made car belonging to Old Court Sav- ings and Loan owner Jeffrey Levitt and his Karol. The two-door 1984 Bitter luxury sedan worth was towed from the Levitts' Lutherville home about 1 said Domen- ic J. an IRS spokesman. The IRS is seeking more than million in back taxes from the couple. LaPonzina would not say whether the IRS plans to seize more of the Levitts' property. The IRS contends the Levitts owe in taxes for 1983 and million for 1984. IRS liens filed yesterday serve notice that the Levitts owe the federal government money and if the bill is not the government can seize their LaPon- zina said. Marvin a spokesman for the state Office of the said the Levitts also owe in back state taxes and liens already have been filed on property Levitt owns in four jurisdictions. The Levitts were to begin serving jail sentences for contempt of court this but remain free pending action by the Maryland Court of Appeals. sure they can get Athey said. He said that the plan would cost less and would keep the accounts alive. don't like the four-year he said. number of senior are not going to be around in four Sen. John R-Severna said the one thing missing from Ratchford's figures is the million in lost interest the million loan from the transportation trust fund wfll cost the state. at least now we have some sort of on Page M. CoL fabatod Ptgu 35. Winter hasn 't left yet ByJUDIPERLMAN Staff Writer If it weren't for the bare yotfd taint it was springtime al- Bat just because the sun is shMag and you feel an attack of spring fever coming dont be fooled. Old Man Winter has become unbalanced of and you never know when he will turn on you. Temperatures this week have ranged from the mid 50s to 60s not too bad for traditionally the coldest months of the year. Yesterday the National Weather Service reported a record high tem- perature of 66 degrees at Baltimore- Washington International Airport The which reached 66 at exceeded Jhe pre- vious Ugh for Jan. 22 of 63 set in 1957. Weather in Anne Arundel County was about the with waterfront areas a bit averaging hi the mid-SOs. it was warm enough to leave gloves at shed coats during the day and eat lunch outside. was an said Don an weather service spokesman. Temperatures were expected to drop into the 30s today and 20s tonight Mild temperatures are not the only unmsual aspect of this Janu- ary usually averages more than 5 inches of bat this year less inde- ques- vkrtis i ENJOYING THE mild weather and a rtoe on a swing at Truxtun act 8-roonth-oW Cynthia FeMkamp and her dnra both of Annapolis. Cynthia Is tha daughter of Edward and Carol Faldknmp. Precipitation in general is way below the normal 3-mch mark. Mar- iar said. The weekend outlook may change that however. Weather is expected to be nice but cool with a chance of rain Sunday or Remember. Last January started off with afld tempsratnres te the bat by the Middle of the the merenry dropped to 6 Jason's for Foote blames city BOB MITCHELL Steff Writer If someone comes vp with AaaapoUs businessman C. says he may let eat la on Jason's restaurant law te part by bis sovabMe dty danetef Peeto MM Twattay he has fee with the city can't sty it has nothing to do with it decision to It probably has an awful lot to do with it It has been Jason's is only one of several well- known Annapolis area restaurants that are tor or reopensnf nader new management At the mot of Mate ley West Seafood GriDe dosed its doors Inn. U so its ownen r said partner lit ownen said While these two city restaurants are up for a county establish- ment closed tar about six weeks will re-open next Tnesday oa Rerell ffifkway wttfc new decor and a disagree changes on the for the said rants. wns nates sen tormerty The WhttebaD wffl feature steaks and seafood along with an elegant new saK Al ef the Mnen can te the teal The emergence of national fast- food sad fall-service restaurant chains means there wffl be Independent at said AjmnpnHs reel es- tate agent Loris Hyatt. yMf-e fstef te And Is Ike tedenealmtts are faing te here te work harder to beal MStmant brfcfctor. eteaner That's what the hag bars are The opening of 14 te the AmunoBs area year means there art toe the restanrants l   

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