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Annapolis Capital Newspaper Archive: March 17, 1887 - Page 1

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Publication: Annapolis Capital

Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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   Capital, The (Newspaper) - March 17, 1887, Annapolis, Maryland                               J I T 1 AN INDEPENDENT FAMILY TO THE BEST I vol.. vi. ANNAPOLIS; MD Mam Si. Hotdl. 'I'.iVS every Anniipo f i 1'wln.Ti1' :i ii'i- mire. CO., DRY Gl Goods and Trunk 'tJrpcts, Matting u Oil Cloth, i'ii .i of MM-. .1... Mb K. KuAMxI.IN A- CO., niViU'lt STilKKT, Mn. FALL and WINTER MILLIN f ih.. i, of THURSDAY EVEN] NG, MAR Gares Backache, Kidney Diseases. Els. A tii.il will the moat skeptical that they at ths best. mrtlioatrrl v'lth capsl- and tlu at i i vi inin. ipleoi f uoleum, beipjf far triire pmvrrf-tl in their actWm ctlierpUstcrs. t -nt be iiiducul to take but be snre and y -i ttic genuine which it always en- (1 in ;w envelope with the of ffta Tlir: R Co., and directions in uur also seal on Irotit aid back of c, a easy terms. Apply Joutiuit struct exl J. Guiitt's cottajre. W. U ai udill, IOC ttli blofrd or ul Kcmtlgta 'tn-ttlpnilonS Kidney GOhC-lAL CUBES KHTCV TraUb'ra, hr RliEUt iT! ID tbc Llmtn. T' vt fives and cuengttie1 CORDIAL CORDIAL CDM3 _ uu 'APITAI; :OUNTY AND STATfc. 887. ngth PRICE [RBflSH WITH COSSACKS. Mtoutj the middle of autumn -we ie a in die direction sgijad, to endeavor to discover the of the enemy there. Threo of Cossacks made up the and we marched all day and of the night before Are came in vicinity of the 'enemy. On tho of tho second day it was re- ed that a considerable detachment L'urki'sh irregulars was encamped a distance in front of us. We had moving during the night with as te noise :ts possible, and had hi- in the ruin withimt building in order to give no notice of our i to the enemy's pickets. It i only jiist daybreak when the ers x> miirch wore given, and the ujnn proceeded cautiously with a scouts in advance. In a half-hour so we who were riding a little ahead he column i-ould see the character- tical Turkish tents assembled little valley a short distanco be- At tho saino iii-stant our scouts the enemy's pickets, and tho liimn Ihaltcd. The camp in sight evidently only a large outpost, and general immediately gave orders '6110 regiment to form and charge lough the camp. We could see tho n ofj the designated regiment un- cr itlnd cross themselves, and in a merit the head of the detachment rapidly moving us. Among officers rode the major, my old nd of the Dobrudscha, who, un- to me. had been promoted to a and transferred another regiment. As he dashed t he made a gesture of recognition  t.'- The thunder of the hoofs, the uking of the grain-bags, the rattling tho cooking utensils, -and the ro- unding whacks of tho nugajkas filled air with a i multitude of hich drowned all othei .sounds. The Utilaratfoii of the moment was su- remc. Horses as well as men fdt its iiiquc stimulus, and we rushed irough that camp, swooping it away i the sudden cloud-burst in the Rockies out tho bed of the arroj-a. It as one of those rare, moments of lifo hen all sense of individuality is merged 'that ;altution, in that which K utterly overwhelming feeling of intoxication of often possesses taiisses of men moved by sonic, rand and simultiiucous impulse. It us, perhaps, after all, a very trivial Hair from a military point of view, ut the sensation; I cxperienct'd was no means insiguiticant or easily for- otten Part of the Turkish force took to ight in time and escaped; those who >uuiincd to defend thbir camp were ibred, spitted like fowl on the lances, r captured and led back to the main olumji 'at the end of a lariat. The 'note of this. IH.tle., incident was fully s impressive as the charge itself, air tiougli in quite another way. After re majde camp that night the men of lie regiment which had engaged the ncmv wen; drawn up io line with un- ovewd sang a religious ymn in chorus. How different now chose faces which ;v few hours bo- ore had been distorted with tho cruel x press! ons of hatred of tho inlidel, or lorificd by the excitement of tho barge or with the consciousness of ictory! Uniforms apart, the men ookcd like a rattle of (ieront. nrntem, by tlie sun .in the elds, and begrimed the dust of {Trkmltnre. .The rolled forth in uaint, sad cadences tuned to a minor ey, like most of the native melodies. Dong the ranks gap ipnrposely left ere and 'there' ishowed (where a com- ade had stood the before. Al> lionga I could not catch the hey sang, the significance of the hymn ouid not bft mistaken.! Mafty rough ands brushed tearful before the ast mournful note died nil egiiatent then dispcrs >d abnut the amp with a quiet if the least oise an insult Jfev the memory of D. MiWfi, in Mai laging Of all tilings! jo i bavedvjclined a i feigh-ride with Mr. dichfeliown hen you know i go off U, tfigrPertr" Wwe Ma, Wpcl I am c hat 'vf JRSJ vrJust iat to away; and the nvite your rir- iett to tliink yrj a t e 11 A K M A C Y R. i. Goodman DRUGGIST fmrr Aixothe Brandt t f f the jHroiirietor. Swfa, Vi icky arid tan th on draught. Won by a Pertinent Story, A few days ago, writes a corrospon ent of the New York Worltl, Cougres man Allen, of Mississippi, who is notlij ing if hot a humorist, ealhni upon tl president and asked for the appoin ment of a friend to succeed a Republ can who had been in otllee many The congressman said to thf that he had told the people whtfl making the canvass in 1884 that if Democrat was elected president Republicans would all be turned o and he now asked that something done to enable him to carry out pledges. The president was not i dined to be at all communicative, was anxious to change the subject talk about civil-service reform. about half an hour's conversation" Allen grew somewhat tired of the situ] tion, and turning to Mr. Cleveland a good-ii'iturcd way said: "Mr. President, this reminds mo u story which oncq happened iu state. There was a wealthy plantf who, after accumulating a good-sis! fortune, died quite suddenly. He li a number of children, who, of couraji expoeteil to como inu> possession of i ewtafo. 4'hoy hail looketl forwanl wil sowe pleasure to whc-n the courts woujj set aside to lioir his share. It was tlx> olH story of tho sjj tk'iuent of estates. The will was tested. Several trips to town and twj or three trials beforii the probate t about exhausted this patience of ti heirs. The prospect __ share of the estate within a faasoual time, was fast fading into the dim misty distance. "One day one. of the sons was on tile highway when returning fi court by a neighboring planter had been the friend of the father. He asked the son how ho coming on with casn. 'The ci was continued again he plied. 'This is thd ninth time I hoi gone to tlio court with tho bopo of g" ting the matlt.-r settl--il, but it Boom can do It has caused mi gitat deal of trouble and expense, s I tliink of it seriously I of wish tiie old man had .never died, The president saw the point, and j leu's man was appointed the noxt di "No Bottom Here." In the early days of Chicago, its enterprise had raised it out of mud, and at a time when it was noi unusual tiling to see n Ijoand nailei a slick driven into the mud at street crossing bearing the inscri "No bottom John Brougl the gc.nial Irish actor, had- a ben McVicker's Theatre. It was in spring of the year, and during a when Chicago was enjoying a wet s The day and evening of hit bcirtsllt an -unusually rainy one. Still, friends managed to make their apj anco, and eagerly awaited his al welcome little licfore the tain. After the first act he came belljrtti the curtain, and all was still to to his expected humor. The silij was so great that the pattering on the road could be heard. With his gr.nial smile up his face, he coimiinnccd. gentlemen, I presiihie I ant tlie flouting population of Chicago.'! The balance of the speech among the roars of laughter, for hep Hd sustained his character for wit andf Magazine. Drawer Gen. Lee'if A short time, after tim battle of Ei, cricksbiirg the observed, a[ carrying a bij i Vit-ioi sof foris the ejes of this tt At 12 o'clock Lopj and with a twiukli you ntl a of somothij} The men drew near; to< u is withdi and the steward fomtfor't onee'giveM doMbo T4ii aueMionable Bold A 
                            

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