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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: December 12, 1885 - Page 1

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Publication: Independent Junior

Location: Bath, Maine

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - December 12, 1885, Bath, Maine                                A J     p y i 4 J J  Y ./�y-J^v r   - VOL. VII. BATH, ME., DECEMBER 12, 1885 NO. 1. Speciallj Contributed to the Bath Indkpendent. ONE THE 1100. MORE HOT SHOT If you are in  doubt  about what to buy for the FROM THE MAD AND DISGUSTED REBELS. JuBt call and examine the endless variety of goods that are offered for your inspection at the store of . S. SHOREY Oppo. City Hall, Centre St., Bath, Me. 9 What the Apostle of Virtue and Honor said at the First Hearing. How He Explained His Position And How u One of the Eleven Hundred" Explains His Explanation, WHY OUR HANDSOME MAYOR IS LIKE FALSTAFF. doing anything to injure or interfere with them*in their business .so long as they are obedient-in political matters-to his despotic commands. And further, why doesn't he, instead of putting on all this [hypocritical'saititly.care for the* "social and moral elevation" of* this community, confess to the plain and simple fact- which everybody acquainted with him and his political antecedents kuow full well-that he cares not a fig as to the moral guilt or innocence of a constable in taking bribes, but does care, and is fully determined that no man shall faithfully enforce the liquor law in Bath if he can prevent it. Such being the real facts in the case, it is perfectly consistent and natural that when on one occasion Marshal Bailey had made a successful search and seizure, he should violently denounce him, saying, "Dam you, your time is short"-which being interpreted means, 3rour marshalship shall end even if it requires a charge of bribery to elt'ect it. This is the man who has so deeply at heart the moral well being of this community-bah! Such stuff is altogether too thin and transparent to deceive any body. It is sickening, disgusting. A wire-pulling politican playing the role of the moral reformer! Think of it, Mr. Editor, and you fellow citizens of Bath! One ok tub Eleven Hundimsd. K.  OF  It. Hath Wage Workers. , , Their Side and the Other Side. THEIR  SIDE. There you will find ment a Large of Assort- BOOKS ! BIBLES, POCKET BOOKS, ILL BOOKS, CARD CASES, CIGAR CASES, $c. Co-operation with the Petitioners and  Co-op-e-Fiddfesiicks. MORE FOOT FALLS. How the Great Big D Was Once Applied to Bailey. & AntoDil Can be found a Large Assortment in LEATHER and PLUSH, at very low prices; also SCRAP BOOKS From 5c to $3.00- Writing Desks AND Work Boxes In Plush and Fancy Woods Fine Assortment of Work Stands Also a AND plaint," ram* andtnatte U, 1 would sign j , - .      . ,,r i them  7, lis. Stats. Wakefield's reply : "(live me an alderman to sign .with me and I will sign all you want."  Ques. "Then you modify vour previous statement?*' Ans. "No. I said sinfflij and alone..1' Ques, "You do not consider it to be your duty to make these complaints?" Ans. "No." Ques. "You do not consider that the statute so provides?" Ans. "I do not. I have taken advice on that and I am told I am not." Ques. "Have yon ever given instruction to the city marshal or any of the olllcers to make complaints in case they suspect that liquor is being sold at a place'" Ans. "I cannot say that I have, I don't think I have. The foregoing quotations are taken, verbatim, from the stenographer's report of that hearing, and from them it will be seen, that Mr. Wakefield pretends that after having "taken advice," he understands and believes that it is not his duty to sign complaints against drinking houses "singly and alone," but only when safcVcomtdaihts^halHiave-hecrii previously signed by an aUlermanor some other person-or, in other words, when a complaint is already completed, duly and fully signed by some one else., then he will magnanimously "furnish his name." When some one else has killed Hotspur, this brave FalstatV will lug him oft' on his back. It is a well known fact that all the law requires or contemplates is that one-and only one-name be signed to a complaint. The printed form of blank complaints now in use in our municipal courts are arranged for the signature of only one complainant. Thus it appears that the mayor's signature following after another, would amount to just nothing at alL It might just as well not be there. And thus the utter absurdity of this quibbling subterfuge of Mr. Wakefield's about signing is made  manifest.    He Special session ot Probate Court next Tuesday, The old building on School etreet has been torn down. Peier Doucett is to open a restaurant at Joseph Footer's old stand. The boiler shop at the Goss Iron Works started in yesterday on a good job. Frank King, who had such a bad fall in a Gardiner pit last week, in slowly improving. The Amaranths will begin a series of social dances at their hall early in January. Read Brown's new slipper ad., and Geo. 11. Nichols* call for attention to his new line of garments. Next Tuesday Supreme Court will sit on the hill, Judge William W. Virgin ot Portland, presiding. Next Monday evening at the Alameda, "A Friendly Tip'1 will be given by an excellent company. The barkentine Alexander Campbell is discharging coal at the M. C. 11. K. pier, all the way from Baltimore. The steam engine Citv of Bathhas been in steady use in our fire department for twenty years with a very few repairs. The city treasurer has been confined to mn mill nn^mm'Slit exactly as well refuse to sijrn it at ���IK THE flHIl IlnrnU" under anv ami all circumstances, for I VII   I ����   VlllkalJlEklll virtually lie does do that.   If the single WE  HAVE f DOLL In Wax aud China, and an variety of |Toys and Novelties. DIARIES FOR 1886 For Further Informa- tion Call and Examine. signature of any private citizen is sufH-cleut for a lawful complaint, as it certainly is, why should it require two, in case they are members of the city government? Does it' take a mayor and endless I alderman to equal one private'citizen? Will our honest; straight-forward, moral and virtuous mayor please* answer these simple questions. The fact is Mr. AVake-flcld knows perfectly well that when one individual has signed a complaint, whether he be mayor, alderman, or the humblest private citizen, that instrument has all the force and power that it would if a dozen had signed it. And therefore his signature, following some one's else, would bring not a particle either of credit or responsibility to him, and would be as useless as a fifth wheel to a coach.  This are quaking in lor their back be   resorted to Vea verily. So pay up. Repairs upon the bavkentine John Bai/.ley will be completed in a week, and she will proceed. This vessel is only tive years old, but her hull is in poor condition. Landlord Longley complains of a dearth oi visitors. Hebeccaand Jim were the last genuine callers and for the past two weeks the only inhabitants of the place have been stray tramps. Moulton has sold the three old boilers which have been at his shop for some time past to Monroe the junk dealer, and the men ot the' machine shop are. now engaged in breaking them up. Last evening several of our young men and ladies promenaded to AVinnegance where they enjoyed a social dance in Perry's Hall. All had a jolly time aud the slab town girls were all out. Last month forty-two letters were received at the post office with special delivery stamps on them. Emmons won't become a Vanderbilt--at-this--ratc.__Xhus far this month only about sixteen have been received. Mext Monday, I. B. Isaacson will pack up his stock of goods here and move to Gardiner where he will close out his remaining stock there. 4'Ike" is having "Epicurean" success with the Blue store in Lewiston. The old Sagady southwest table never gets left. Saturday evening the Lewiston poloists1 came down to the rink and played a game ot polo with some local stars, Morse occupying the goal. A very small audience was present and did not find much to applaud. The Bath players were beaten three straight goals hi ten minutes. Last Saturday afternoon the creditors oi William Mampel convened in the Aldermen's room and arrived to the following conclusion, after a short discussion of the case. Maniple is to pay oil* his debts at fifteen cents on a dollar, and is to do it in three payments in the next twenty-one months. i. The electric gongs for the lire alarm arrived Monday and were put in Tuesday, the Independent youth having the pleasure of making the initiative test. They worked splendidly. In the evening Alderman Greenleaf and Chief Engineer Williams sounded an alarm, and in just five minutes, driver Douglas arrived at the City Hall with his horses and engine. Since the annual fall cut down in ship carpenters' wages the men have been dissatisfied with their condition to an usual extent. An average carpenter this fall and winter is receiving $1.25 a day on winch he might grub along perhaps if he had regular work, when, however, you reflect that stormy weather takes pretty near hall his time away, or in other words out ol each week two, three and sometimes more days, he cannot earn this pittance owing to the rain or snow, then his condition calls tor our sympathy. How con he support his family in comfort it he has one? How can he lay up a dollar for the day of need ? **But a dollar and twenty-five cents for his day's labor is better than nothing." None realizes this cold truth so well as he. Nor does he know that there is anv wav in which he can better himself, but he has resolved to find out. So a certain workman jive weeks ago began to inquire about the Knights of Labor association. He talked with his fellow workman, and the result was the great mass meeting ot workmen of this city held in city hall last Monday night. The hall was packed like a sardine box, hundreds more tried but could not get in. The meeting was as great a success as some others in years past of a similar character have been failures. A. A. Carleton, Mass. state organizer and chairman ot the Knights of Labor tor the Boston district, was introduced by Chairman Israel Eastman, and Mr. Carlton, who in appearance and manner greatly resembles our late honored ship builder Edward Sewall. for two hours and ten minutes held the close attention of his large audience. Lack of space this week prevents a report of this speech, to which, however, we listened with great interest. He, himself a workman from the shoe shop, in a (piiet scholarly as well as able address presented the wage workers' side He deprecated strikes; simply asked justice; claimed the prosperity of nations depended entirely on labor; our own nation's patriotism, virtue and success depends largely on the treatment of its labor by capital. He claimed that wage workers made political leaders; therefore statesmen should listen to their prayers, for aid. Neither statesmen or capitalists would, however, listen^ to the single workman. Therefore combination and organization was necessary to obtain influence. The Knights ot Labor was started to educate workmen. They came together to learn/ They were not for political purposes or* ganized. They were to1 discover and put in practice, without strikes it possible, new principles on which the relations of labor aud capital should rest. The capitalist should have a fair profit, but the laborer who made that profit should be given fair recompence tor his service. No socialist doctrines were advanced. Some of the speaker's theories seemed too ideal even to be realized in practice in this imperfect world ot struggle aiid craft. Much of this talk was most practical. In a nutshell his speech was an argument for the laborers to organize, educate thems-seves to a proper knowledge of the labor juestion and remedy peacefully existing wages at that figure were too low in my opinion. They, however, figured it over to nie and convinced me that our margin was not unfair. You see th� N. E. S. Ji. Co. .doesja't^ charge./wharfage, etc., j etc.. us other,simitar 'concerns.' do. "We charge less for labor too aud make only a snifill margin on materl-il. If we didn't we couldn't cet the work from Boston and Portland at all. We have $100,000 invested in our railway so we've got to mnke � margin on the labor to pay interest on this sum and a profit. If the men would pay us the interest and a lair profit we'd gladly turn the tiling ovw to them to run. dipt. Goss insUted Uv,\t the builders were doing as well as they could and struggling themselves, and if the carpenters struck or crowded the yard owners the builders would have to quit work and that was the whole story. " He bad himself lately been three times to Philadelphia after one contract. He was doing all he could to nmke wages higher in Bath. Other builders talk about the same, though some more severely. OUR WEEKLY ;FIUE. Are Fire Bugs Operating In Bath? Our weekly fire came Wednesday evening at six thirty o'clock, a small unoccupied tenement house in Crescent street "court being the victim. Owing to the high wind the alarm given was very p >or, and the engines experienced great difficulty in finding the fire. Long Reach reached the scene first and got in some good work, extinguishing the flames before the other engines arrived. The building was probably set on fire. The property was owned by Samuel Jordan who loses three hundred dollars. DID  IT  UP BROWN. Concluding, the Independent would express it-* sympathy with the working men, but at the same time urge them, for the winter at least, to hold to their plan i f going slowly. As the prosperity of all towns depends on the wage workers, so Bath's depeuds almost quite on the 500 carpenters, wood and iron workers employed in our yards and manufactories. Four years ago the weekly pay roll of these men amounted to nearly $20,000 a week and now it won't reach $8,000 perhaps, but times are looking up. When the wage worker suffers we all BufTtir, but slow and carelul action is much better than hasty agitation and strikes every time. Meantime, the general sympathy of the public is with the workingmen. Until Takes the Lead on Clubs. Thursday afternoon in the rooms of the Bath Athletic club, Edward Brown a well know local athlete swung a pair of six pound Indian clubs for four hours and thirty minutes without cessation. This beats the previous world record by fifty minutes. Judges and timers Were present and everything was done up Brown ! ANOTHER  LANDMARK GONE. Death of a Good aud Kindly Old Early Monday morning Elbridge G. Wilson passed away after-a-lengthy illness caused by a partial paralytic shock and old age. Mr. Wilson was born in Topsliam seventy-eight years ago, but has lived here nearly all his life. He has served as city marshal and in other public offices. The funeral occurred Wednesday. SWEDKNBORGIAN   SOCIABLE. AMERICAN  HUMOR. tine are add the the and unfairness. At the close Ira Robinson was elected secretary, Wm. W. Carter treasurer, and 38 signed a petition for a Bath branch of f the K. of L.   They adjourned till next Monday night,  The Bath men1 lay special stress on the fact that at the N. E. S. B. Co.'s yard the men get gl.2d a day and the Co. charges $2.50 for one man's work, making on the laborers a clear $1.25 a day per man. They further claim it is impossible to live even decently well on $1.25 a day with irregular employment. However they talk fairly. They do not propose to strike. They do not and will not ask for an advance during the winter. They do, however, think the cut downs begin too early in the fall. THE  OTHER   SIDE. TO  SHOOT  ARTILLERY. w. SHOREY. is what hej 'ills "co-opkkation"-co-opc-flddlesfei Vwhydou'the tell the truth, and honestly Avhfoss that he has no intention 6f offending his allies, the rumsellers, by Tomorrow and Monday evening the Salvation Army will entertain several distinguished visitors from abroad, and as the temple on Middle street is not large enough to hold the influx, the City Hall Us been hired for the two evenings,   _   . ..We interviewed Captain Goss Wednesday in the bank. We asked him what he thought ot the K. & L. agitation. He remarked that it was right and proper for the workmen to meet and discuss their views, lie acknowledged it was very hard on the ship carpenter of late and especially in the winter. "But it is quite as hard for the builder with freights down in 'Frisco and jobs in consequence hard to get." . Capt. Goss said he would be glad, per-sonally. to pay men $3 a day- in winter if times warranted such wages. But ships were being built on very small margins now. He once had nearly failed to get a contract $500 only being in dispute, on the price. He offered the desired purchaser the use of his yard free 'and material at cost if he would build the vessel himself, just to keep the men along. The N. E. S. B. Co. treated men fairly. Seventeen years ago it. was like Sunday in Bath. He^Juilt the C. O. Whitmore, the men agreeing to risk wages on the sale ot the vessel. As lucV had it the bark sold well and the men got $*-\50 a day He did this largely to give the men employment. What* other firms built so many vessels in winter ? Here he turned to a ship builder near by and asked him if he would build a ship this winter it the men would work for 50 cents a dav. The builder said that he would not. "The other firms largely hang up in winter and build in long days when labor is worth something," said the captain. < "$1.25 in winter is equal to $2.50 in summer.   Halt the time is used in shovel- Tuesdav afternoon and evening from the hours of three until nine, the ladies ot the Swedenborgian society and their invit-ed friends were most hospitably received at the  elegant residence of Miss Alice Sewall on Washington street, where an unusually pleasant sociable and sale ot fancy  articles  progressed   between   the hoars mentioned above.   The guests were received in the south parlor and library, both ot which apartments  were greatly admired for their tasty luxuraince.    Especially so was the library which is as perfect in its way aa is possible.   It a perfect model   of a combination of unique art, architecture;- and   design. � Several paintings on porcelain by the hostess given   not   undue, prominence  and great!)' to the beauty of the room. On north side ot the house, was spread feast asuconjured up by Misses Clara Nan Patten, and Lu Larrabee, with Miss Cutler as cashier.    Hither came all the guests at supper  time, and their wants were quickly supplied..   After partaking generously of salads, with rolls, and colVee and chocolate with a fine assortment ot cakes, the company dispersed into social groups or wandered into the fancy boudoir in the north parlor,   where   every known novelty in fancy handiwork could easily be found.    Miss Welles presided over tins department and was materially assisted by the ladies ot the society, who experienced no difficulty in selling all the pleasing intricacies which had occupied so much of their time during the past tew months.   Indeed it was a rare occurrence to examine an article and not find it labeled "sold,11 so appreciative were the guests of what is beautiful.   Undoubtedly it was the most elaborate and exquisite display of tancy articles ever seen in this city.    To describe those tables as they appeared to our admiring gaze is next to an impossibility, hence we note only a few ot  the articles which to us seem especially deserving.    The charcoal drawings  of Miss Sewall were greatly praised, and were speedily sold and several more of the same type   were   respectfully ordered by the many who desired to obtain these fine art memoriabilia of their hostess.   Then there was an elegant profusion ot such articles as embroidered chamois handkerchief and glove cases with satin linings, opera bags in .variety, innumerable sachets, gentlemen's shaving slips with hand painted decorations, elegant key boards, hand painted banners, tidies with rare and costly embroidery, unique dressing cases and dusting bags.    Several of the articles were painted  by  Miss    Alice  Sewall,   Miss Mariam Dike and Miss Cutler, and the ladies deserve great credit for offering their services.   The fair was one of the most successful ever given by the society, and the ladies thank their hostess for their kind aud social reception. A young literary man in Portland recently had the finders of his right hand cut off at the first joint. Pie will uow write his stories in shorthand.-Puck. - A modern wit defines the difference between men and women: "A man gives -iO cents for a 25-cent thing he wants, and a woman gives 25 cents for a 40-cent thing she does not want." "Hhit Professor, how do you like my new tragedy?" "Very much indeed. Especially the robbers-they are first-rate. In fact, they are the be*t thieves I ever heard of; even the words they speak are stolen from other books." From the German. City Editor-"How is this? what's the matter? You have only written up a couple of stickfuIs today." Reporter- "Well, I saw in the Free Press this �   r � niornioir that Bancroft thinks 250 words i3 a s utile lent day's work for a literary man. There's 275 there."-Detroit Free Press. � * HE GOT OFF ftptroit Free Press, "Is vour name White?" a  4 t corridor door and an. PROVERBS ABOUT WONUDM. GOING  TO  SKIP After Running the IJank Twelve Years. � � M > 1 - .  L" v.; x     L T i -  i J    j + 'p H ;*! 1cc. ing snow or chipping "Well, captain, the men say you give $1.25 on old work and charge $2.50," observed the scribe. "Yes.  I told,-and- that the At the annual meeting of the Twenty-Five Cent Savings Bank people the resignation of Geo. W. Johnson as cashier will be acted upon. Mr. Johnson has been since June 1,1871, treasurer ot this institution, performing his duties acceptably to the public and the bank officials during this long period* ot service. During these years he has not once skipped to Canada and his accounts have been carefully and honestly kept. He now proposes to skip across the street to assume charge of the growing business of the enterprising firm ot Johnson Bros. Having so long handled silver Mr. Johnson won't find much'novelty in dealing with hardware! Johnson Bros, are Bath boys who staid at home and so we arc pleased to congratulate them on their fine stand, large stock and very promising business outlook. The rapid increase of their business made it necessary for Mr, Goo. Johnson to give up his position at the little bank and take his in the ranks of our citv merchants. Philadelphia Jfeica. Women are born, ho ftrto declare^ To smooth our linen and our carpV; And 'lis but just, tor by my trotfi, They're very apt to ruffle both. The Italian proverb puts it: Luzyiftnll, Croris>erahied if "small; If handsome, vaiu. Shocking, if plain. SANTA CLAUS i: With Useful and Elegant Gifts for Ken, Youths and Children, has arrived at L. DOUGLAS I    L    -� W 9V. .'j4, ft Warm Overcoats, en's Nobby Business Suits, Children's School Suits, v Stylish Hats & Caps, Underwear in Great Variety A VERY LARGE LINE of place I Nobby Neck Ties and Gent's nishings. ; |^ Just the things for Xmaa Present* DOUGL .Alf 19943310   

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