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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: December 5, 1885 - Page 1

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Publication: Independent Junior

Location: Bath, Maine

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - December 5, 1885, Bath, Maine                                //    YOL. VI. BATH, ME., DECEMBER 5, 1885. NO. 52. -FOR- christmas!! -CALL ON- CL1IP # NICHOLS AFTER THE FIGHT A Review of the Events of the Constabulary Contest BY ONE OF KING WILLIAM'S REBELS. C H R I AND SELECT YOUR. i present: M BEFORE THE RUSH COMMENTED, ! The Mayor's Change of Base. Astonishing Acrobatic Performances. "Now You See It and Now You Don't." | citizen, or have body in deny. THE  SIMILITUDE  OP CITY GOVERNMENT THE BIG-HEADED SCULPIN. THE TO  The most sensible unci desirable Present for tlieHe Hard Tiroes la 11 pair of our r.adioa' or Gent's Slippers-Nobby nnd Stylish, Comfortable mid Durable.---------.--------------- Wo have just received the greatest variety of S-L-I-P-P-E-R-S Ever before opened In thin city; consisting In part GENTS' Hand Embroidered; Genuine Alligator; Maroon Goat; Opera; Harvard Ties and What Business Had the Municipal Parliament to Meddle With the Constabulary Movement? "VOTES THAT OUT-WEIGH. Everett. LADIES' Citizens Who Cry "Good Lord" To-Day, and "Good Devil" To-Morrow. AN IMPORTANT EXPLANATION-OLD TIGE DEFIES THE BOSS. HOW THE MAYOR INTERPRETS THE LAW. The Imitators of the Chief's Ground and Lofty Tumbling. French Kid Beaded; i Opera; Bronze; Magnolia; Embroidered; Oxfords; Garnet Oxfords and Coxcomb Operas. CLAPP and MCHOLS. New Store  New Stock; No Shopworn Goods; Selling at Hard Time Prices. The Best Mixture! WHY THE DEFEATED REBELS NOT WITHOUT COMFORT. ARE Two Fniuiy Stories.  The 'Giant Who Lived on-Wind. Mills, but Who Was Choked By Butter; and The Hunter Who Fired  Between Two Rabbits. -of- Corresppndent Who Jjets Off His Surplus Steam and Writes a Few Facts Worth Reading. In Bath, At 20c Per Pound! a. s. WILLOWS SAWYER'S GOODS MEASURES TAKEN  AND  FITS GUARANTEED. Children's, Boys' and Men's Suits and Overcoats Hado from the Celcbrntod "Sawyora Cloth." These goods are much lov er than formerly, and wear better than any f, loda in the market. aoc TO $1.00 Full Line of SCOTCH CAPS just ree'd. MUFF-' Y. BOY'S AND i CHILDREN'S CAPS-, Leading and Nobby TIES and LERS from Boston and N. UNDERWEAR from 25c to $2.00. J. L. DOUGLAS, Batb. To The Musical Public: MR. CROVER OF  HOSTON, Takes this method of cailinu- the atlenllon of the musical portion of the community In this place to a class of Piano Korte Work which Is not usually Introduced outside of Boston, restoring the Imperfect condition of the PUho (when such is required) to all the requisites which are tieeded to make tho tone pure, harmonious nnd lively, Imrcushijf the volume of tone and restoring tho notion to a inoro susoeptlblo touch. Warranted satisfactory or no tiav Orders may . bo loft at Hath Hotel. Leave orders early. Btewikn GbOVKH. Mr. Editor: The prayer of the eleven hundred petitioners for tho appointment of James Bailey as State Constable for the County of Sagadahoc having been finally denied by the governor and his councillors, we wish now to briefly review the subject and give to the public what we understand and believe to be the true ' inward-ne>s" of the whole matter.   At the first hearing of the petitioners  before  the executive council, Mr. Wakefield distinctly stated that ho was sent there by the city government of Bath for the direct purpose of opposing the appointment of a state constable.   lie had all along ridiculed the idea of such an appointment, as not only uncalled for, but as absolutely preposterous and absurd, and implying that the present city government was unable to attend to its own affairs in the enforcement of the laws- which he declared to bo false-affirming that the prohibitory laws were enforced as well and even better than they had ever heretofore been, and therefore that there was not tho slightest need for a Btate constable.    Mr. Wakefield's attorney also distinctly admitted that the appointment of a stale constable would be an express condemnation of Wakefield's course, tantimount to a positive declaration that ho had failed to do his duty as mayor in the execution of the 'aws. When, however, they were completely defeated on this point by thestubborn laets and unanswerable arguments of the petitioners, what does this blustering, wirepulling politician   do but   turn a complete somersault, and presto! change! behold the invincible._n.in.yflr...who had. been sent to Augusta by the city government, to opjtose and prevent the appointment ot a statu constable stands before the governor and his council and coolly declares that he has no objection to the appointment of such an officer but  decidedly recommends it.    What kind of tnorul or political jugglery is this?   Now you see it and now you [ don't see it.   Sent by the city council to oppose and defeat a certain measure, he deliberately recooimends its adoption. Now it might well be asked what will the indignant city fathers say and do when they shall learn that they have thus been betrayed and tricked by their illustrious chieftain?    Kind reader, if you felt like asking such a question-as you naturally-might-you had only to wait a little to discover that this wonderful and unique creature called "Ouroion city council"-like a sculpin-is composed almost exclusively of Head and Tail, and while it is the great ugly head that wills and bites, it is the obedient tail that wriggles and propels.   Have you heard any complaint on the part of the majority of the city council because Mr. Wakelield instead, of persistently do-ing what they sent him to Augusta to | do, viz:   to' oppose  and prevent  the appointment of any slate constable, deliberately turned "right about face" and recommended the appointment of two (no matter "who, if* only   Bailey   be not one of them) as speedily as possible?   Has the Baid   council  snapped its  teeth   in   dissatisfied   wrath,    or only wiggled in complacent obedience? Which is Head, and which is Tailt^ It might be well, perhaps, to enquire right here, by what authority, and under what statute law a city govern ment, as such, has anything whatever to do, in its. or ganized capacity, with either favoring or opposing the appointment of a state constable.   Undoubtedly each individual member of that government, may, as an individual citizen, either favor or opposo   it, tho same   as  nny other but that they are authorized u right to act as an organized such  matters,   wo positively And therefore do not hesitate to affirm that Mr.  Wakefield, as  he has appeared before the governor and council throughout this entire, contest, was entitled to tho same and to no more consideration than any other gentleman [ among tho petitioners whom he has opposed.    Undoubtedly he was the approved champion of the entire body of rumsellers and rumdrinkers, and has, and does control tho rum vote in this city.   But that fact certainly ought not to give him special power and influence before a body of high, honorable and just men, such as may be supposed to constitute the executive council of a great stato.   No! Mr. Wakelield, justly and legally, could only appear and act in this matter in his individual capacity. And so in its true and lawful aspect, as the case was presented and stood before the governor and council, it was. in reality, simply one citizen as opposed to j eleven  hundred  others.    The   many oarnestly desiring-in accordance vvitb the laws of the state mado and provided forjust Buch occasions and exigencies as now and here exists--to see an honest and effective enforcement of the prohibitory law, asking and praying for the appointment of a certain man whom llioy well knew to have been long tried and fully proved as a good and efficient officer, and the one determinedly and' unscrupulously opposing it. Now the whole matter was resolved into this simple question, which shall hnvo the greater weight and influence with the powers at Augusta, the one, who is acting in direct harmony with tho unlawful rum element, or the eleven hundred who are acting against it? Had there been no other questions involved but those of temperance and the official honesty and ability of the proposed candidate, we are fully persuaded that the eleven hundred petitioners would have prcvailod, and long ere this "Old Tige" would have driven a score or more of vile rumsellers from their devilish business in this rum, and political boss cursed city.   But while thoro was unquestionably very much of moral worth, respectability and wealth on the side of the many petitioners, there was, alas, on the other side, all the political skill, unscrupulous power and cunning of the boss wire-puller, King William of Bath. Votes! Votes!  To political aspirants- whether in Bath, or at Augusta-these often outweigh almost everything else. And so it need be no matter of unusual surprise, when we behold two of our prominent representative^?) men ready to cry "good Lord" today, and "good Devil" tomorrow.   Sign a petition ask ing for the appointment of a certain man ono day, and deliberately swear that he is unlit for it the next.   O consistency! thou art a jewel indeed! Thus wo see that before some tribunals one political trickster may outweigh eleven hundred good and true citizens, and may also drive some men, who look forward and aspire to office, to bow low, eat dirt, and act the part of knaves and idiots.   Mr. Wakefield, according to his own statement, was perfectly willing that any other man-no matter who or what lie might be-among the entire population of Sagadahoc County except Bailey should bo appoinled, but Bailey -James Bailey-the man who in utter disregard, and open defiance of the repealed commands of the "Boss" himself, had continued to do his duty by faithfully enforcing the liquor law, be could never allow him to fill the exceedingly "important and peculiar" office of state constable for the said Count? of Sagadahoc.   O no, that would be altogether too much for his high nnd upright notions of what is required for the "improvement and elevation of our social and moral standing as a community." His strict ideas of pure morality might allow him to "co-operate" with others in .the innocent,pastime of secreting a rum-seller's liquors when tho officer of the law was endeavoring to seize them, but could not for a moment permit the thought that any man who had once received a bribe-even though it were taken at his own hand-should   ever thereafter hold an aupointment as a humble officer of the state.   O, no, no! the cause of pure morality, he could never submit to see it suffer.    Eleven hundred other citizens, including ministers, deacoiiB, christian fathers, wives and motb'-9 might consent and desire tho appointment of a dishonost and immoral man if thoy chose; but his high and conscientious sense of right and purity would not allow him to think of it for a moment. What! appoint a man to the position of state constable, that exceedingly "important and peculiar office"-who had refused a five dollar bribe nt tho hand of John, but received (unwittingly) another of twenty through the hand of his brother William! that would indeed be too much for his extreme virtue and moral sensibility and night have a pernicious influence on the moral character of the numerous saloon keepers and their innocent customers whe rally beneath the standard  of him who has openly de- clared in the very face of the chief executive of the state, lhat "every man has an undoubted right to drink liquor and get drunk whon he pleases," and that be, Mr. W., will never, himself engage in the enforcement of a law, by doing that which the law specifically says that he shall do, and which, as mayor, he has solemnly sworn to do. The   contemptible subterfuge   behind which ho seeks to screen and excuse himself from his sworn duty, as mayor, in the signing of warrants and executing the liquor law, by pretending that the statute only requires him to sign in connection   willi an alderman, is too absurd for serious notice, and no respectable third-rate lawyer would lor a moment think of giving it such a construction.   We have already alluded to Mr.  Wakefield's wonderful  skill and dexterity in the somersault business. This acrobatic performance seems  to have been infectious (like circus tricks with the boys) for soon after the brilliant exhibition by the mayor, one of the first and most prominent movers in the ranks of the petitioners became so infatuated with tho desire for "lofty (?) tumbling," that he proceeded to try bis best to outdo the "boss" himself, and alter a little private  discipline   and tutoring,  ho came forth and publicly turning a most stupendous somersault camo down sprawling, and immediately scrambled on "all fours" from the ranks of the petitioners to tho side of their opposer.   Certainly  the "boss" got a powerful "nip" on him that time, and we presume ho is cured and will hereafter answer promptly to the crack of tho ring master's whip. Voolish William, silly ranger, Keep the traces safe ami sure; | Rambling only lends to danger �Sueli as you can ne'er endure. But the petitioners, though betrayed and defeated, are still not without comfort.   For ',o offset tho strange devel-opmentof this insane desire on the part of somo of their prominent members for high and lofty lumbling,nm.\ playing the clown, we are nevertheless, on tho other hand greatly consoled and comforted by the very pleasing and encouraging revelation that our governor and iiis council were only restrained from granting the prayer of the petitioners and appointing Mr. Bailey, by tho same holy abhor-anco of anything like official corruption, which filled the pure heart and controlled the virtuous actions of our immaculate mayor, and which alone led him, from a high and devout sense of duty, to stand up in all his moral dignity   and   contend  against eleven hundred of his lens scrupulous fellow citizens in,opposing the said appointment.   So strong and deep-seated were the conscientious convictions of these officials, touching the absolute necessity of moral purity  In the most humble officer; that even the fact that the said Bailey had repeatedly been elected to the office of city marshal, Bince his.alleged   official   corruption,   by   large majorities composed of the better part of those who voted in each and every case and had proved himself an efficient and faithful officer, and tho further fact that the eleven hundred who prayed for his appointment wore individuals who from' personal acquaintance and observation wore in every way fully competent (as much so as the mayor himself) to know  and judge  both of his character and   ability-so   pure  anil strong we say, were the convictions, and so tender the consciences of these gentlemen in regard to moral purity- lhat all the foregoing facts were insufficient to overcome them.   Now, is not such high-toned moral integrity on the part of state and municipal officers good and sufficient reason for our comfort and  consolation   under defeat?   Certainly  wo   ought to   bo exceedingly thankful lhat we are blessed with such pure, unselfish and devoted rulers.   But this singular and unusual manifestation of moral sensitiveness on tho part of these officials, breaking out and for the first time developing itself so clearly in tho case of this petty appointment, reminds ns, nevertheless, of the quaint story of an ancient giant, who had long fed upon windmills, but at last came to be choked by a little "pat of butter;" and somo there are so cruel and unjust as to insinuate lhat these later political giants belong to the same family. Yes, some men widely known, and believed to be men of the highest character for integrity and wisdom, have even hinted that the Powers at Augusta have and are acting upon a settled plan, which plan is to accede to the strong/ and earnest petitions of tcmperano/ people, in so far as to consent to the appointment of constables, hoping thus/to hold on to the temperance vole, whiK at the same time they will be very cnrefil to appoint no ono but a "fool or a tool/' and thus endeavor to secure the "run/ vote" also. Those same wise men however believe also, that this two-fac/d policy on the part of these high oflfeials will result like the Irishman's shooMig; when in attempting to shoot two r it were some yards apart, ho/' fired between them, and missing both.   But after tainly refreshing in the? oral looseness and laxity-and strict integrity, tr among' politicians ano-pullers, who are wij' sako of promoting 1 of integrity and hor prove and elevate standing of eomn alone in their r virtuous champ persecuted rum the appoiutm> who would ' hibilory law In closiu' ing' apprr ner dest "when and w flourish j it is that they shall bo destroyed forever." Wherefore, "Fret not thyself because of him who prospereth in his way, because ol the man who bring-eth wicked devices to pass... .The Lord shall laugh at him; for lie seeth that his day is coming." When, like his inevitable cigar, be "shall consume; into smoke shall he consume away." Having thus "ventilated our views," and wish-in"; to show onr "manhood" and please his moral highness, King William, we subscribe ourselv s OMR ot the F.I.KVKN IIi:NI>lil-:l>. OLD  TIMES. Less writer, OM Timer in th� Argonaut. than forty-five years ago, the then a farmer's boy, drove his father'., wheat to market, at the Genessee Houring mill, and received for it eighteen shillings-two dollars and twenty-live cents-per   bushel.    To-day wheat   is worth six York shillings-seventy-fivo cents per bushel.   The land upon which that wheat was raised was worth seven ty-live dollars per acre.   To-day it will sell for one hundred and twenty-live dollars.   The best farm-hand, for all the year round, received nine dollars per month and one pair of cow-hide boots annually.   The fields upon which it was raised boro wheat only every other year; they were plowed turning a single furrow; were sowed by hand, cradled by hand, raked, bound, and drawn to the r,hrcsher~f~the grain winnowed through"a j fanning-niill turned and fed by hand; | grain sacked in   bags, and, .when tho' wheat was sold, the bags were retained. The farmer's hoy then dressed in "sheep gray," from wool raised on the farm, j carded, spun and woven in the county; | made by a seamstress-or   "tailoress" i we called her-who came lo the house 1 and worked for three shillings-thirty-seven and a half cents-per day.   Hoots were made from the hide of cows or calves killed upon the farm, tanned in the village, and made by the village shoemaker.    A sealskin   cap, costing seventy-fivo cents, lasted through ever so many winters, relieved from summer duty by a straw hat.   A college student taught the winter school for seventeen dollars a month, and "boarded round." In 'winter we snow-balled, slid down hill, and skated.   In summer we swam i in the creek anil boated on tho pond.] There was a village debating society, and we had district  spelling schools. We drove the girls to apple-paring bees in "pungs," made wilh crockery crates on "bob-sleds" filled   wilh straw and buffalo robes. ' There were husking frolics, candy pullings, maple sugar-making, summer   picnics,    general    training, Fourth of July celebrations, Thanksgiving dinners.   Wo did not dance, because is was wicked; we played games nnd I kissed the girls for forfeits.   In summer we played ball, and our mothers made the balls of yarn  unraveled .from old stockings and covered with o'ld buckskin gloves.   We mado the bats ourselves.    We pitched   quoits,   and the quoits were old horse-shoes or Hat stones. In winter we broke steers and colts.   In hog killing times we blew up the bladders and roasted pig-tails.   In the long winter evenings, around a blazing lire, we had apples, cider, butternuts, and hickory mils-these gathered in the summer, and their gathering was a holiday. I We miide our own soap, our own oan-dles, our own sausages, our own dried beef; for mince pies we boiled down cider; we dried pumpkins and apples for winter use.   Oiir mother made pickles and preserves, knit our stockings, mittens, and woolen comforters.   Over our clothes, at work, we wore a tow frock. In summer aftvr the dandelions came we went barefoot.   In spring wo mado corn-stalk fiddles, whistles from the willow, and flutes  from   pumpkin-vines. We fished with angle-worms.   We went to school in/the winter, doing the chores in the  nyjrning  and   evening.    We worked ot the farm in summer,   lu winter time t/ie collar was stored with pork in barre)1;, with apples and potatoes in bins, etyer and vinegar in barrels.   The vinegar was made on the farm.   The smolre/iiouse was hung with hams and dried/jeef-every farmer cured his own hams.    Cabbages  and   carrots   were � buried for winter- use, - During- the-fall tho /Vinter's wood was felled.   At the firs/ fall of snow it was drawn to the ki/dien door.   To chop it was part of t^e morning and evening chores.   All Jinds of fruits were preserved, encum-/oors were pickled, butter   was salted down.   Tho farmers' bods were made of feathers, and every farmer raised his own geese.   Tho quilts were patchwork. outskirts of the town, and novcr went to church, and of whom it was darkly hinted that he was nn infidel, and shunned as such by all the other good people. ' To amuse ourselves we went to the menagerie or exhibition of wild animals, to which all the country young folks might go-the circus was tabooed to the more orthodox families, who "made conscience an excuse for meanness.   This class of young folks skirmished for the shilling of admission, or crawled in under the tent.   Accompanying the circus was the side-show of the fat woman, the boa constrictor, and the Albino children. The clown of that day was better than the one of to-day; the horseback riding has   never  been   surpassed.    General training was a great occasion.   Flection day came in August; it was an important day for settling lights and for wrestling matches.   The Fourth of July was tho grandest day of the year.   It had its procession, reading of Declaration, oration, and poem, and in the evening, fireworks, fire-balls of cotton-wick soaked in turpentine, lighted and thrown by hand.   We had Chinese tire-crackers- sixpence a package.   A blacksmith's anvil placed above another did duty as artillery, and was fired at sunrise on Independence Day.   The great social festival was New Year's Day.   Christmas .had about it the flavor of popery, and in those days Home was regarded as the scarlet blonde bad woman of Babylon. There were no saints in that part of the country at that time. An_DCCilsiopjil_ concert was given with comic songs-I recall one: "Pretty Polly Polly Hopkins, how do yon do? None tho better, Mr. Tommy Tommy Tompkins for seeing you." Another was "Coalblack Rose." and "Jump Jim Crow." The latter ran '. thus: livery time l'tuin about anil wheel about I do just so, Kvery time 1 turn about and wheel about I jump Jim Crow." It was the beginning of "negro min-strelsv."   A learned pig was exhibited which couid play cards and step among eggs without   breaking   them.    The < sliowbill described the performance 'as "tho learned  pig dancing on  eggs," There were very few foreigners in my native county.   No Catholic church in the county, and not a Jew.   But one negro boy attendod the district school- his name was "Guy."   There were but two men in the comity worth more than ten thousand dollars.   The family was well to do that had an income of four-hundred  dollars.    Rye  whiskey  was twenty cents a gallon ; genuine imported Havanas three cents apiece; half-cents, and two-cent pieces of copper,  silver six-penees, and shillings were abundant; the silver currency was Spanish.   The marriage outfit for the bride was a silk frock, a china tea-set, a feather-bed with plenty of bed linen, with underclothes, and six silver teaspoons, with a young cow if a farmer's daughter.   Whon anyone died the bell of tho village church was tolled, and then struck .the years of the deceased.   There was no undertaker; the body was "laid out" and prepared for burial by  fiiends.   There was no hearse.   The coffin  was made at the carpenter's shop, and carried from the houso or meeting-house upon a bier borne by tho pall-bearers to the village graveyard.   Wheat or corn wss taken to the mill in grists, and "toll" was taken by the miller for grinding.   Wool was carded into rolls and spun at home upon a spinning-wheel.    Flax  was  broken upon a hatchel at the farm, spun into thread, and  woven upon a hand-loom into cloth.   There was a dye-tub in every farmer's kitchen-tiio color was blue or yellow-and the cloth was taken to the fulling-mill to bo  fulled and bleached.   Clay, for bricks, was trodden out by oxen in pits.   Oxen were shod, being lifted in a frame by a band beneath the belly.   Every neighborhood had its cider-mill and press.   There was a cotton-mill,    woolen   factory,  grist-mill, broom factory, saw-mill, lime-kiln, and place for grinding plaster in the town. Fire was lighted by a steel and Hint and "punk;"'  then from   phosphorus vials with a chemically prepared stick. There were no envelopes, black sand was used for blotting, and letters were fastened with sealing wax.   Peddlers travelled wilhgstovcs, tinware,dry-;;oods, washing-machines,. i n -cxuhange. for._farni_prod uch., C'indy came in  the shape of peppermint-drops, and in sticks, red and white, flavored   with   lemon   or  cinnamon; molasses candy was cheap and common. We had a barrel of peaches every year from Now Jersey; a barrel of sweet potatoes every fall from South Carolina. Oysters, in winter, came frozen in kegs; they were brought to within nine miles Every fanner's wile made her own cov- ! upon the Grand Erie Canal. There erlets. Hired men wore neighboring t were no railroads. Tho stage line from farmer's boys, coming from farms where j Buffalo to Albany, passed our place. In there were more boys than land. Female our part of the country we had what wu "help" were the farmers' girls, from then regarded as comfortable, but no homes where there were too many girls, i elegant or costly houses. Plumbing was All "help," of men or maids, sat at tho I an almost unknown art.   We had no same table, sat in the family pew at church, rode in the family carriage, composed the family, and at all family gath-!,ics woro treated as equals.   There ' 'v pauper, a criminal, a prosti-"d woman, a man who had '       'V, a boy or girl 'I, in tho town-,    as we knew. vster's spell-Daboll's r, Olney's was the lanac. vrs," l " ! water-closets in our houses, no fixed ' I) uhing-tnbs.   In an open kitchen (ire-place swung a crane, upon which the tea-kettle always hung.   Meats and fowl were roasted upon a spit, with a mechanical contrivanco for its turning.   Tin reflectors were used for baking.   Beans and corn-bread were baked in a Dutch oven covered with hot coals.   A brick bake-oven was  located outside of tho house.   There were no fires allowed in churches; foot-stoves   with basins of burning charcoal were in  use.   Bods were "aired" with a warming-pan.   My grandfather woro pumps with silver buckles, knee brooches, a buff waistcoat, shirt frilled witli lace, a blue claw-hammer coat with brass buttons.   From his atch-pocket.liung fob-soals, and on his id a nondescript, low-crowned broad-Mined plug hat; he carried a nold-'ed Malacca cane,   My father's best was a plug hat of more modern blue coat, claw-hammer, brass is; white_ vest, long pantaloons, loots.   

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