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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - November 21, 1885, Bath, Maine                                > VOL. VI. BATH, ME., NOVEMBER 21, 1885. NO. 50. OIFE^IlsTQ- I Shaw's Bookstore, A Fine Assortment of HOLIDAY GOODS, Novelties and Christmas Cards. Also at the TOY BA.ZA.T?, A Splendid Line of Dolls, Toys, Games, &c-OALL and SEE THEM [Special, Report Written for the Bath Independent.] WILKINSON'S WOE. Police Officer Lawrence's Murder Avenged, AN AWFUL WARNING FOR BURGLARS TO HEED. MARBLE CLOCKS! Cathedral Chimes and Gongs. A. Gr. PAGE, m The Belfast Hatter! OLD BlUC HATS put In the Latest Stylo with all New Trimmings. Old Style DKttBY Stiff Hats bleached and blocked In the LaUiBt Styles, with all New Trimmings.-No Agents Eraplojcd. Centre Street, next to Alameda. Society Well Rid of a Professional Thief, Burglar, Jail Breaker and Murderer. HUNG ON THE GALLOWS. A Resume of the Shooting of the Night Watchman in 1883, and the Capture of the Murderer. DETECTIVE   WOOD'S   STORY OF THE CAPTURE. CLOSING SCENES OP CHIME. A LIFE OF DANIEL WILKINSON. OFFICER LAWRKNCK. Graphic. Pen Picture of the Execution at the State Prison Yesterday. THE   MURDERER'S   RKCORO AUSTRALIA. IN To The Musical Public: MR. CROVER OF  BOSTON. Takes thla method of nailing the attention of the musical portion of the community in this place to a class of Piano Kortu Work which is not nsually introduced outside of Boston, restoring the Imperfect condition of the Piano (when such is required) to all the requisites which are needed to make the tone pure, harmonious and lively, in'reasing the volume of tone and restoring the fiction to a more auBceptible touch. Wnrranted satisfactory or no pay. Orders may he left at Bath Hotel. Leave orders early. Stephen Grovkb. Hidden Treasure Never to Be Dug. it slipped up The sale of my Music and Stationery Stock; therefore my stock is STILL IN THE MARKET, And for sale at very Low Figures to any Cash Customer. Meantime I shall "stock up" and supply any and all goods In my lino at Lowest Living Prices. Thos. P, I. Magoun. HOWLAND New and Beautiful Articles for the Holidays, at WATCHES CLOCKS SILVER AND JEWELRY BRONZES PLATED For the second time since 1885 came on the boards the gallows-drop hits fallen in Mtiine, nnd three murderers have paid the penalty of their dreadful crimes. At 12 noon today Daniel Wilkinson, an Englishman by birth, shot through the trap at Thgmnston. nnd the sentence of the law vans expiated. WARE at prices that will insure selling.   Gold, Silver and Fancy Headed Canes. HAYDEN. Great Auction Sale! -AT- -Isaacsons:: clothing.'. house, FRONT STREET. $6000 WORTH CLOTHING -AND- Furnishing Goods At Your Own Price. SALE TO COMMENCE TO-NIGHT -AND TO CONTINUE- EVERY SATURDAY & MONDAY Until Entire Stock in sold. This is a chance of a lifo time- -All qpr FIXTURES For Sale. JtyRemember 1 Sale evf-ry Saturday and Monday Kvenings, until the Kutiro Stock it (old, at ISAACSON'S CLOTHING HOUSE, I. B. ISAACSON, Auctioneer. As the day of execution drew nearer and nearer no change had taken place in the feelings and demeanor of the prisoner. He knew his approaching fate nnd realized the terror of his situation. He conducted himself in all respects like a gambler who bad staked his all on a card, after taking all the chances into consideration, and lost. Thursday night brought the reporters and sheriff's aids, all Of whom were deeply impressed by the firm and self-possed bearing of the condemned man. Thursday was passed by Wilkinson in no wise different from preceding days the last night. Wilkinson laid down on his prison bed at 7 o'clock last night, smoking, but did not undress until 7.30. At 9 o'clock he was sleeping soundly, awaking at 12 o'clock. After asking the time of the nlgbt-wateh, he went to sleep again awaking at 4.30 in the morning, and re raaining awake after that time. At 7 o'clock this morning lie partook heartily of his bread, coffee and milk and smoked a cigar with apparent satisfaction. When his breakfast was served he made the remark that his appetite was as good as usual. Soon alter breakfast he was visited by Dr. H; C. Levensaler, prison physician, and our reporter. Wilkinson stood by the door of his cell, clad in the parti colored prison uniform, with folded arms, eying sharply his visitor. The reporter saw a short, thick-set man, with a large and shapely head, slightly bald, heavy, dark beard, hazel eyes, and flushed cheeks. His coarse shirt was thrown open, showing the breast and shoulders of a Hercules. In conversation with the reporter he said that he was 39 years of age. He was born in London, where be lived, attending school until he was 14, when he went to sea. His father and mother are both living in London, where the former is proprietor of a small store. The prisoner heard from his parents about four years ago. They know J nothing of his crime and fate, and it was the desire of Wilkinson that they should remain entirely ignorant of his sad end. As he spoke of his boyhood home, his eyes moistened, and bis voice slightly choked but the imminent flood of tears was resolutely choked back. When spoken to with regard to his trial Wilkinson seemed to feel very bitterly. '�I nm an Englishman," said he, "and therefore I must die. I did not have a fair trial. Those witnesses stood up there and perjured themselves, and I suffer for it. I did not intend to kill the policeman. I shot at random, and it killed him. I knew when I was sentenced that it meant death to me. I was told that tbe Italians would be hung, but that I, Blaney and Mrs. Barrows would be pardoned. They may be pardoned, and probably will be, but I knew there was no hope for a foreigner. Governor Robie dislikes all foreigners. Here," (taking up a copy of the Kennebec Journal,) "is a report of a speech he made at tbe slate fair, about his dislike for aliens. I knew I was to die, knew there whs no hppe for mo, and I made up my mind for the worst." Wilkinson woighed 180 pounds, and was, as he expressed it, "the smallest and weakest of his family." The officer who had charge of him after he was put into solitary confinement said that he appeared as cool nnd collected the last hour of his life as at any time during his confinement. ' He displayed the most wonderful nerve and will power. During the forenoon he wrote a letter to an Augusta lady who hud interested herself in his spiritual welfare. Rev. F. N. Towers, the prisoner's spiritual adviser, spent two hours with him during the forenoon. lie found him somewhat softened, and repeated several prayers in a devotional manner. He spoke quite feelingly of Mrs. Knowles of Augnstn who has written him several letters with reference to his religious welfare. As Mr. Towers loft him at 11 oVlock, the prisoner said, "If it had not been for a letter which I received last night, I would not have been alive this morning, but would have taken my own life." Mrs. Bella Knowles of Augusta visited Wilkinson during the forenoon and was handed a letter written to her by him in which he expressed hopo of a change of heart for the better. -At 11 o'clock he took his dinner of tea bread nnd meat, which he ate with his usual relish. Chief of Police Tibbetts of Bath questioned him in regard to there being n third parly concerned in the Lawrence murder, but Wilkinson denied it. He also denied the story which has been circulated that he was the person who made the murderous assault upon Dr. Dana of Portland with a sand-bag some time before the Bath affair. He said that he was in the bark eatine Gem of Boston at the time, shipping at Mobile for Aspinwall, thence to Cuba apd Philadelphia and from there directly to Bath. HISTORY OF THE CASE. --.  i Twenty minutes after midnight of Monday, Sept. 3d. 1883, a pistol sht.t echoed through the deserted business portion of Bath, and immediately following, a second report startled many from their slumbers. The first shot, it was afterward learned, was flred by Officer Kingsley, who having disturbed three burglars who were seeking to effect an entrance into D. C. Gould's grocery store on Commercial street, ordered them as they sought to make good their escape, to stop. To the watchman's command, and threat of shooting if his order were_nolobayed, one of the men replied: "Oh, no, I guess not!" and quickened his pace. But ho guessed wrong, for the official tired-without effect, however. Two of the men then made for a hiding-place behind Monroe's junk store on the corner of Arch and Commercial streets, which the third, Daniel Wilkinson, as after events proved, ran up Broad street, with his ugly .32 calibre revolver fully cocked in his hand for instant and deadly use. Kingsley, in hi� chase of the burglars, had blown his whistle for assistance, tearing which, Officer Wm. Lawrence, foming down Front street, turned into Broad street, where he intercepted the fleeing Englishman and ordered him to halt. At the same time, putting both hands on Wilkinson's shoulders, the officer exclaimed: "What have you been doing?'' Wilkinson, unable to escape, as he afterwards confessed to Detective Wood, raised his ready weapon, and taking quick aim, fired. The officer's grasp of the murderer's shoulders immediately relaxed, and with a groan he sank upon tbe frosty road. The spot where the tragedy occurred was just opposite the eastern half of Welch's boot store, on Broad street near Front. When found the head of the murdered officer was resting on the face and in the direction of Front street. At this hour, Officers Tibbe'.ts and Harriman were eating their lunch at the police station. Hearing the shots and whistle, they left immediately anil found Kingsley. The question then arose, as one of them observed, "Where is Uncle Billy?" The trio of watchmen with their lanterns instituted a search, and soon discovered the body of the faithful officer, lying in a deep pool of his life blood, which was still oozing from the cruel wound in his skull. He by the south curbing and corner. LOOKING  I'OK the MI'ltllKKKIt. After much pulling and hauling on the part of the authorities, and runu'mg to and fro in vain bv the police, on Wednesday evening following the murder, Detective J. It. Wood of Boston at-rived in Bath. Already information received showed that two suspicious persons hud been boarding in a Portland cheap house since Aug. 24, and that they were out of that city Sept. ">. Mr. Wood found in this house a sailor's bag, left there by these men. From papers therein he learned the mimes of the men to be Thomas Elliot and Daniel Wilkinson. He further learned that on the day after the Bath murder, Elliot had returned, acting strangely, and had stated that he and Wilkinson had shipped at Bull) on a vessel which they would join in Boston. Wood found that Wilkinson, two years before, for robbing a store at Thwing's Point, had been convicted and sentenced, but hud escaped from the Bath court-house basement.   The nt- "What would you say if 1 had a man ready to swear that thaMlask was yours. What would yon say1 if he swears you put this piece of paper in the crack to prevent the powder coming out? What would you say if he swears it was yours and you carried it to the store?" "1 didn't have it. The other fellow carried it all the time!" suddenly blurted out the prisoner. Of course ho had given himself dead away. "If so,'' said Wood, "I'll prove you shot lawkknck. The chisel was carried by you. It was dropped half way between Arch find Broad streets. Officer Kingsley says the man who shot Lawrence dropped the chisel and ran up Broad street. The 'other fellow1 carried the powder, you the chisel. You hud the revolver, he none.   Isn't that so?" "I don't know. I never saw him have one." "You probably shot accidentally. Yon tempt on Gould's storo   corresponded I didn't mean to kill.   You shot him. with similar recent burglaries in Brans wick. Wood then drove to Thwing's store and learned that the manner in which this burglary had been effected corresponded exactly with the manner of the recent attempts at Gould's store and Dr. Lord's in Brunswick, which was by prying open the door. Further a Japan U flask titled with rill a powder was found in the junk store hack yard.__In a crack iTf fhTrUask 'was crowded a piece of the Portland Aryux dated Wednesday Aug. -.   This scrap Wood carefully picked out with his pen knife. Further a match was found in Brunswick on the premises of the drug store. The match had a purplish hue of brimstone instead of the Ordinary yellow top. Further, the recovered chisel which was used to pry open the door nf Gould's store was found to tit the indenture ot the store at Brunswick. The conclusion reached was that probably the men who attempted to burglarize the Brunswick store were the Bath burglars, and possibly Wilkinson, who robbed Thwing, was of the gang. A second time on Friday the detective went to Portland, and informing the boarding-house keepers who ho was, took them into confidence. Again the bag was searched and a match-safe found containing matches that corresponded to the one found in Brunswick. A letter had been received from Wilkinson at Bangor, stating that he had a two weeks' and perhaps a permanent job, and for them to take out Elliot's things, and send balance to him. Wood jumped aboard the next train for Bangor; routed up the marshal; set all the force to searching the city and suburbs for Wilkinson. When the men reported at head-quarters, a man who had been on the river in a boat said that he had followed to his boarding-house a man employed on the river, logging, who answered the description. the man was soon akuested didn't you?" "Yes, I did!" "Why? Why didn't you run around him?" "I couldn't; he grabbed me so (putting both hands on the ofllccr's shoulders) and said, 'What have you been doing?' I couldn't get away sol shot him." Wilkinson stated further that ho threw away his chisel and drew his revolver when Kingslcv ordered him to stop or he'd shoot. Ho had it in his hand while running up Broad street. He, after seeing Lnwreneo fall, ran up Front, down Center and through various streets until he reached High street, which ho followed to Thome's Head. He found by the shore a boat-then one good ami one broken oar. He pulled across the river, tied up the boat, and walking to lh� first station on the K. & L. railroad boarded the train and lay close near the the examination. the fatal tkagedy. Sheriff' Irish assisted by deputies J. M. Porter, D. II. Mansfield and C. R. Morton; J. W. Peabody, Ira M. True, Officer Kittredge of Bath, Officer Cook of Rockland and Dep. Despraux of Brunswick, proceeded to the cell of the condemned man at 11.30 o'clock to prepare him for the scaffold. At 11.50 the terrible procession came out of the western door in the new wing of the prison, taking the same route that the hanged Italiansi took in their march to death. Rev. Mr. Towers, clad in his Episcopalian robes of office, led, followed by the condemned man clothed in a suit of black serge, with arms tightly bound to his sides. Wilkinson walked firmly looking straight ahead, with face slightly flushed. As he stepped upon the fatal drop he showed not even a tremoi, and stood calmly looking around while the sheriff's assistants bound his legs. As Deputy Sheriff Morton adjusted the noose around his neck he looked up smilingly and said, "You fellows get $50 a day for such work as this." As the Episcopalian death service for condemned was read he listened attentively,but made no responses. "Do you wish to say anything?" asked Sheriff Irish. "Nothing." was the muffled answer. As the black enp was adjusted Wilkinson lifted his head in such a way as to facilitate the operation. At just 12 o'clock the fatal trap was sprung, the fall being, seven feet. With a slight rebound the body hung lifeless, not even a shudder being discernible; Unlike the bodies of the two Italians there was no swaying or twisting, and Wilkinson evidently suffered a painless death. The body was at once removed to the station, after being viewed by Coronor Ballon. It was examined, post-mottem, in the early morning by Dr. E. M. Fuller, assisted by Drs. Bibber. Westcott, Small and Ridoout. The bullet had made in the right cheek, two and three-fourths inches from the median line, a hole into which one could insert the end of one's little linger. The skull was removed and the ball found at tbe base , of tbe brain, flattened by contact with the bone. Its course was through the malar bone, thence into tbe muscles backward and inward into the medulla, which it wounded, nnd thence to the floor of the occipital bone, one-half to the right of the median line. City Marshal Bailey with Officer Tib-.betts-took-a-teamsoon after the murder and visited Brunswick, whore a man was arrested, but afterward released. There were all sorts of rumors abroad, several persons claiming to have heard a I team driving furiously up Center street hill about one o'clock Tuesday morning, and later in West Bath. Two or three claim to have heard a man's voice crying from this team, "My God, I've shot a man!" At Gould's store the burglars had u�ed a jimmy, with such effect that when the proprietor and his clerk arrived there at five a. m., a slight shove was sufficient to sond the front doors open. The safe contained from $500 to $800, but as it had a strong combination look, the burglars would hardly have made a haul had they been undisturbed. In the morning a relative of the murdered officer performed the unpleasant duty of informing the family of the removal of its head, and naturally the wife nnd daughters were rendered nearly frantic with horror and grief. The murdered  officer was universally respected. Ho was a thoroughly conscien- ] tious man and a faithful, painstaking officer. His life had been passed mostly on the sea, he having served as first officer of large ships, under Bath captains. He had desired the autumn of his life to he passed on shore, at home. The general sympathy expressed for the family was put into financial form, by the city government, and at the funeral representatives of tbe city were present, while thoughtful friends had hidden tbe grave in green. and arriving at the marshal's office gave an assumed name. "Your name Is Dauiel Wilkinson, and two years ago von escaped  from  the Bath jail," said Wood squarely to him. The culprit acknowledged the fact. Wood then tuld him not to answer questions. This was at 7 p. m. Saturday, and the train left at 7.-15. The man's overcoat was obtained from his boarding-house and in the pocket was found a long thirty-two calibre cheap steel revolver, carrying five shots, and having a light hardwood handle. This was the pistol with which the man shot and killed the officer. Marshal Reed, Mr. Wootl and Wilkinson took the train, the detective seated with his charge. When off from Bangor and comfortably e9conced in the cushioned seat of the car, Wootl said : "Now, Daniel, yon are wanted in Bath for the murder of Officer Lawrence, i Remember, I tell you to be careful not to say anything that will be used against you. But if you do answer my questions tell me the truth." Wilkinson then said he had no objections to answering any questions. Wood asked him, "Where havo you been since leaving Portland ?" .......The prisoner, made such a manglo-in his description of his whereabouts, that the detective scored one point.. "Supposing I should tell you that I hid two living witnesses ready to swear that you were in Bath on the night of the murder!" observed the detective when he had concluded. "Well, I was in Bath, then," said Daniel. [Wood was bluffing when ho made the suppositious statement, as be hadn't any such witnesses.] "Supposing1 that 1 should tell yon that your chum Elliot told me that you car ried the powder Mask with which to blow open Gould's safe?" [Wood hadn't seen Elliot.] About this stage of proceedings the prisoner's brow was covered with drops of perspiration and he showed signs of nervonsnoss Here the officer caught Ihe criminal's eye for the first lime, and he held it as he followed up his advantage.    ^ went to hockland. Here he staid one night, and then took steamer to Bangor, when he obtained work as described. He further informed the detective that he obtained the chisel in Brunswick, where he sent "the other fellow" to a hardware store. The pistol lie bought in Portland, where also he obtained the flask arid paper. Before Judgo Tallman, Wilkinson pleaded guilty to the-indictment of murder in the first degree. Ife laid in Augusta jail until August, 1881, when after a short trial he was found guilty and on the 24th of that month sentenced to he. hanged, being taken at once to Thomaston. It is perhaps now of little interest lo narrate the legal steps taken by II. M. Heath, esq. of Augusta, Wilkinson's counsel, to save his client from punishment for the crime, and our space is too limited to admit of .more than passing reference to the discovery of implements in Wilkinson's coll, forwarded to him In Augusta- jail, (where he was confined while awaiting sentence) with which to effect his escape from behind the gratings. 1 Both counsel and friends tried bard t6 help him, and he had no just cause for his complaint that he was' punished because a stranger in a strange land. A few weeks ago lawyer Heath, before the governor and council, argued for a reprieve or commutation of the death sentence, but the executive could see no reason for granting such request. Once or twice the Independent has alluded to Wilkinson's intelligence and shrewdness, as shown for instance in his clipping an editorial from a copy of this paper received by him in jail at Augusta, which referred to him in severe terms as deserving punishment for bis crime. Ho saved the clipping, to confront our reporter with it should he ever again meet, that youth and be asked for any "favors" in the shapo of interviews. '.Vilkinson was no fool and he was perfectly sane. There is nc fear that thero has been any mistake in hanging an irresponsible person. Since he has been in confinement Wilkinson has stated that at* one time ho was a bushwhacker in Australia, in which country he had a fortune in the shape oi buried treasure. The country finally became too warm for him and ho -left-in-baste,- tenving-his trcgsarcfwlttr' tho intention in after years, when he had been forgotten, of returning to his former haunts and securing his booty, now dcstinetl to remain buried forever. ALL. the end of Drs. E. M. Fuller of Bath, Hitchcock of Rockland, Stone of Camden and Prison Physician Levensaler examined the hanging body, and to the last named the Independent reporter is iuduhtcd for the following report: Muscular contraction ceased two minutes after fall; three minutes after pnlso whs 90, 4 minutes 84, 5 minutes heart unsteady, 5 1-2 minutes 72 and very irregular. At (! 1-2 the pnlso was barely discernible at wrist; 8 minutes alter drop pulse 44, witli long intermission in heart beats. U minutes pulse 30, 10 ruin, 44, 12 min. pulse ceased; 15 minutes heart ceased to beat; 17 minutes body cut down. PHOTOGRAPHS ! Equal to the Best to be obtained, and at Moderate Prices. SEVENTEEN YEARS IN SAME STUDIO! A... HATCH", Church Block, Bath. ALL THE LATEST STYLES I 17   

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