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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: October 17, 1885 - Page 1

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Publication: Independent Junior

Location: Bath, Maine

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - October 17, 1885, Bath, Maine                                VOL. VI. BATH, ME., OCTOBER 17, 1885. NO. 45 GOODS [Written Especially for the Both Independent.] AGAIN. Some More the Rough Record of Governor Robie. ANOTHER VENTILATION OF MAYOR WAKEFIELD'S REPLY. Old Tige Still With Untarnished Reputation. A GAME OP BLUFF BY HIS KX- CKLIjKNCY. > Owing to Damage by Smoke and Water to my Large and Elegnnt Stock of DRY GOODS AND LADIES GENTS AND- SMALL GOODS, '.Since Tuesday I have been Belling at about HAtiF PRICK, all my stock which has been removed lo the -LATE^ STORE OF CORNISH-THE TAILOR, CHURCH BLOCK. AH In want of ihould call at once. iBy the recent fire iny ttock wna damaged; no only nm I selling such goods at a lling BIG DISCOUNT �i But I havo Marked Down the ENTIRE STOCK AT PRICES FROM 40 to 50 PER GENT. Below the Market Prices. TO LADIES IN WANT OK Dress Goods, Silks, Satins, Trimmings, Cloakings, Hosiery, Laces and Ribbons. IgfNOWIHTHK ClIANCK TO OBTAIN THE VKHY Most poshihCiK kok OAsu.fi* I offer to Gentlemen also, Bargains in Shirts-,* Underwear, Cloths, Handkerchiefs, Gloves, Hosiery, &c, &c. )I am offering this Bale ua a Benefit to the Citizens of Bath, and I Htiall CLEAN OUT MY ENTIRE STOCK IMMEDIATELY! I desire to enter my old store when it la ready, with a Bran New Stock. All Goods purchased warranted Excellent Bar. :galna for the money. If any purchaser i� disatie-itied, will refund his or. her money,----- -This is ft BONA FID A FIRE SALE to recover V Mr. KtUtor:-I am again obliged to ask permission to occupy a portion of your columns, not so much for the purpose of giving more facts relating to the attempt to obtain special constables Tor Sagadahoc county, as to make comments on the position the Governor and Council have taken and the articles of some individuals in this city who claim, I should say by the tenor of those articles, to be great admirers of his excellency and associates. In writing my first article my purpose was, as stated, to give the public a correct statement and a condensed report of the case, so that all, more particularly the petitioners, might be informed of the result of their petitions.   I had been informed by parties who had been, aud are active in the movement, that no ufllcial report to the petitioners had been made, and I thought it no more titan right that they should be informed how the matter stood.   I took the liberty, not claiming to be one of the active workers, to make that statement.  This, as has been seen, has drawn out articles from the other side, which as far as I Can understand, do not amount, as a defence, to as much as the paper upon which they are printed. More meaningless expressions of words, and greater display of elfrontcry, it has not been my privilege to see in print, and if the Governor, Council ami City Government, cannot obtain better defenders than they have shown themselves, they, to use a little slang, ''better sell out." In my previous article I stated that the Governor failed to appear at the llrst meeting appointed, excusing himself by saying that pressing business called him to*Portland, and detained him there during the day set for (lie hearing.   Let us look at that statement or excuse.    The parties on both sides were notified at least one week previous to the date set, that they would be heard, the petition having been laid upon the table for this date, and Governor Kobie knew through a number of channels, that great interest was felt by this community.   What was his business in Portland?  lie was called there the afternoon before the day Bet, by business, connected with the reunion of. the Grand Army.   This business was, I am informed by a member of the committee, completed that evening, and he could have returned to Augusta that morning in season for the hearing, as did my informer return to his home on the same train that carried to Augusta a number of the persons interested in the move-, meat. The fact fs, a poor excuse is better than none, and is somewhat transparent. The opinion expressed by some and concurred in by every one of the delegation, ^vnjrthut the-Governor dodged the question.   At this session, as I stated before, the presiding otllcer, backed by his associates, agreed to give both parties seasonable notice of at least one week, anil that at the adjourned meeting the matter would be attended to.   Now let us look at this.   How did this notice first come? Through the opponent of the petitioners, Jos. W. Wakefield, requesting him to notify the petitioners that, the hearing would not take place.    Why were the petitioners not notified as promised?   I take the liberty to insinuate that the Governor does not consider the interests of this city aud county of any importance, unless they have the indorsement of a political manipulator, who boasts that he carries Sagadahoc county iu his pocket. Quite a heavy load I should say.    Why was the Governor not willing to have the hearingatthis time?  Simply because lost money. From my Insurance 1 ob'rihi putt of my losfl, and  I can ecll the goods at Low Katea. OMtemcmcmticr all goodn Market! Down, in* jurod or not injured, 40 and 50 Per Cent. Oeo. H. Nichols. GEO. NICHOLS it did not serve his convenience and because the mayor, representing the city, notified him that he could not be present at Augusta that day, but was at the same time on our streets seemingly without much business. I was not aware before this, that the Chief Executive of ihe State of Maine with his seven advisers, not mentioning the large number of petitioners, should be obliged to await the convenience of one man before matters of such importance could be allowed to proceed. Hut such seems the fact. The members of the Council expressed themselves as strongly as their position would allow them on the conduct of their Head, as they did oil the conduct of the mayor of this city. The excuse given by the last mentioned olUciul for his non-appearance at Augusta, will puy.y.le many business men in this city when it comes to their ears. This brings me to the hearing itself. The Governor I think coming to the conclusion that the petitioners were in earnest, and having promised a number of them that the matter should be attended to and be decided on Its merits, could not very easily postpone it longer. Your readers are well aware of the* result of that hearing. A victory was gained by the petitioners, notwithstanding the opposition of the City Government represented by the mayor and council. The rejection of the person who Was named for the position, was brought about by ! an action which will not stand investigation. Right here I will make a query: How can a candidate be rejected when he is not a candidate9 Perhaps it will be necessary to explain myself. The iaw relating to state constables gives me this idea. If the Governor and Council are at any time convinced that such ofllcers are necessary, they shall advise the appointment of them; then comes the appointment by the Governor of persons to till the positions. Such appointments must be confirmed by the Council. Such ofllcers were decided necessary but the Governor did not to my knowledge notify officially the petitioners, that he could not appoint Mr. Bailey, The only information the petitioners had was through the press that the Governor and Council refused to appoint the party named. Then it was that a small delegation visited Augusta, Interviewed the Governor, and were informed that the petitioners having been granted a part of their prayer, thus obtained the privilege of nominating the persons for the positions, and he should consider the petitioners had the sole right to make the nominations, but at the same time he intimated that the mayor might object, and It was then made more apparent, to use an expression of a volunteer supporter of his excellency, that there must be something "rotten In Denmark.*' It. was evident that the political power of this county had him secure. It is known by a number of interested persons, that every influential member of the council is under personal obligations to the political power of this county, which stamps that member as totally unfit to occupy any olUcial positions. The use of olUcial position to satisfy personal favors condemns any person and is entirely inexcusable. The petitioners, not being ofllcially notified of the result of theh\ labors, and in compliance with the decision of the Governor ami Council, as coining to them through the public print now sent a communication nominating James Dai-ley and Solomon S. Holmes as persons best fitted to fill the olllces. This brought the llrst and only olUcial response that has been received during this long attempt to get what was and is thought a proper and necessary assistance to good government in (his city. The Secretary of State informed the parties, by request of the Governor and Council, that Mr. Bailey, smirched as he was, could not be appointed. Mr. Holmes, being conoi-tiomilly nominated, no action on him as a candidate could be taken. This is the action which Mr. Rogers condemns with such holy horror. The petitioners' position was like this. Not having received any official notification from the Governor of the rejection by him of the candidate named, what reason had they to. take other action than what thev did aud nominate to fill the number which was deemed necessary? Is this treating the Governor aud Council with contempt? The contempt, in my opinion, comesfrom the other side and has been shown from tin; Governor all through this effort. But I feel, Mr. Editor, that I am trespassing upon your space and the patience of your patrons, and will close after reviewing the articles that have appeared from volunteer defenders on the other side. First 'appears Mr. Uogers, who supposes, assumes, insinuates, suggests aud declares thus and so. He appears to my mind a true type of that character mentioned in Holy Writ, and expresses all that Is necessary to say in reference to him and his effusions. I will say this : if truth is abuse, then I am guilty of the charge of abusing the Governor and Council. Until better authority than Mr. H. comes forward and makes such a charge, I shall hold my ground, and claim that- nothing that appeared over my initials savored in any respect of such a tendency. Now for the heavy artillery man, Mr. Wakefield. I do not claim to*be all powerful .with the pen, neither do I have access to the republican press of the State of Maine, so the review that I may make will not be perused by his co-workers in political circles.......ButjLhtsJ'actdoes not trouble me. For this community I am ventilating my feelings aud stand free of any charge of being an ambitious politician. Truth is all powerful-more lasting than falsehood! Just look at the position of the Mayor of this city. The City Government u!i-rected him to oppose the prayer of the petitioners. His claim was not deemed sufficient and the prayer was granted. Now steps in Ilis Gracious Majesty and says that "if His Excellency and the gentlemen of the Council thought from the evidence such an appointment was necessary, he should accept it as an honest difference of opinion, but felt compelled from a sense of duty to the eiti/ens of Bath, to  Mttn - swimming. married. Oh. it was quite a mash, 1 do assure you.    We talked about   everything-about �i books and poetrv and music aud art, and all those delicious things, and then the conversation drifted mound to skunks. She said she Vad been reading' an American paper recently,and had come across the word. She never had seen it before,-and it struck her curiously.   What ttas a skunk ? The train was just stopping at a way station. I lowered the window, nervously unfastened the door and let myself out. The English young lady was looking at me steadily, her finely pencilled eye-brows arching in a mild surprise. "A skunk," I explained in a strained'voice, as I got through the door, "a skunk is like a- a kitten-but-but-" here I let go the doorhandle and got ready to run ; "It-It is different. Oh, it is ever and ever so different. ' Then the train started oil* and I got into the smoker and burled myself in the inpenetrable fumes of other people's pipes. Since then I have carefully avoided the English ladies. I like them well ".enough, and they are pretty enough and sociable enough aud all that, but they are too inquisitive about America. Till; lM'KITANS* STAMIMNC.  riltOt'Ml. STOP  MAIDENS ! The Cap'n's Got a Girl. �i i Last week Captain Clapp of the firm of Clapp & Nichols advertised in a halt inch space of the Ixdkpkndkxt for a jirl to boss his kitchen on Bath street. Saturday afternoon both at the house and store the "help" began to arrive. All this week the procession has kept moving.   At first Further, Mr. Wakefield says that he does not suppose one-half of the petitioners knew or realized the exact purport of the document they were asked to sign. Does Mr. Wakefield mean to insinuate that his constituents are ignorant and wanting in intelligence ? That is rather impudent, Mr. Editor. No doubt he knows from experience how he has managed, and like the guileless man he wishes to make the public believe, judges accordingly. This brings ine to the terrible record which bears with such great weight upon the minds of the Governor and Council, and Mr. Wakefield, and which they say has never been expunged. Who is the man of spirit and honor, that if Innocent would permit so damaging a charge to stand against him on the public records and never demand a hearing, and asks, Why have not Mr. Bailey or his friends made an effort? I will give him the reason Mr. B. or his friends did not then, or do not now consider that record of any importance whatsoever. The result of the election immediately following the report, satisfied them ot that time that great injustice was done the man, but no damage was sustained. Subsequent elections strengthened them In that position, and no less an "authority thau the J'artlund J'nss under date of Oct. ikl last, further gives .them support in saying, "a careful reading of them, (referring to the report of the committee and the aflldavit of Wakefield, Brown and Daniel) will show that they do not necessarily impute any such offence, that is, taking bribes, or any such confession of having received bribes." Mr. Wakefield further says, "I have not attacked this man Bailey in the dark." Joe thought the girls  all Imfl-business with him, and being a modest bachelor he grew alarmed.   The   bell pull on Bath street was broken early in the week but this was considered a blessing.   The captain returning at meal times home lias had to elbow his way into the house through a menagerie of maidens of all sorts and sizes.    Most of the good looking irirls called at the s'orc and the homely ones at the house.    The handsome captain has been in despair, tor he couldn't take them all, and it was dangerous to show any preference.   There were blue eyed girls from   Georgetown   and black-eyed ones from Winnegance.    Some   hailed Irom Nova Scotia and a lew irom Erin.   There were Bath girls and Topsham fair girls, Dutch girls and Swedes.   Some insisted that Joe was the party who had advertised and wanted to know how old Ins wife was and whether  she   ever   came   into the kitchen.    One eighteen year old Miss, when Joseph insisted that he hadn't any wife, wanted to know when his wife died and whether the children were his own or his grandchildren.   She said shcM treat thutuJiku-astep mother^-JoiJ-otie^IayJiad to get a ladder and skip to   the roof, whereupon the captain called for the police. Wednesday all business  was suspended aud the runners who called heljied entertain the maidens while the captain tried to explain- that he had a girl aud didn't, wouldn't, couldn't, shouldn't hire any more for love nor money.   At night when Captain Clapp has wearily gone home he has found heaps ol feminine debris Mich as false hair, bustles,  tortoise shell combs, old rubbers, pieces of shawl and umbrellas in his yard.   The only explanation is that the girls got to quarrelling among themselves while awaiting each her turn at the dislocated door bell. The cap'n has got his girl, however, lie looks a little paler and thinner aud not. quite so handsome as he did last Saturday morning before the Indki'KN'dknt came out, and he has acquired a nervous habit of starting for his back shop when a lady customer enters the store, but he'll {jet over his troubles now. The campaign has agreed in the main with his junior partner, but the captain says that rather thau sro through such another battle with the fair ones he'll hang a red flag to his sign. STILL THEY  REGISTER. - In the City Clerk's Matrimonial Album. Henry Lcrmond llattie J. Curtis John W. Passmoro Harriet. K. Oliver "William K. Douglas Emma Lot a Oliver Hath "beautiful-beautiful!" the .bulge murmured, in a sort of ecstasy, as he withdrew his gaze from the outside world aud rested it mil upon my intelligent countenance. "Very fair," I responded, with a qualifying accent; "but a trille lathy, it seems to me, ami somewhat given to ribs." The Jiul^a favored me with a toug-drawu-out stare, "What imbecility is this ?" he muttered, as one who communes within himself.   "What have you reference tu r" "The buys," I answered, softly.   "1 was looking at the boys," "I was speaking of this exquUite English scenery," the Judge rejoined, with great distance and severity of manner. Then he fell again to staring out of window. "Oh," I said, with an apologetic, emphasis on the antepenult of the word. Then the conversation went out like a candle in a sudden draught. I have noticed in America that the bovs ex-hihlt a fondness for bathing iu sight of passing railroad trains. It was delightful to come across the water and Hud, as it were, the same emotions inherent in the human breast. It emphasizes the fact that whether we are Englishmen or Americans, we have descended from one common stock, and that through centuries of time ami oceans of water may divide them, j . the boys of England and America are bound to wasii. a umim.iKr. namm, Aud as I mused upon these things I fell into r a gentle doze, from which 1 was presently abstracted by the stopping of the train, ami the guard's voice calling: "Boston-Boston' I grabbed my valise and crawled out the door, rubbing my eyes in a dazed fashion. "Where shall we put up :" the Judge asked. "At Young's," I sleepily replied.    "Best a j place in the city.  Call a cab and tell him to drive us to Young's." The Judge shot at me a startled look, and then raising his carpet-back in air, smote men terrific clip over the head, a twenty-pound relic ot-lUimaiu\V4vUxi\tddng4uc Avitli-gi-uat-nefU-iivsH-hehirid the starboard ear. "Wake up!" he called, loudly.   "Wake up ami talk sense." So this was Boston, England, and not our oivu home city of pork aud culture and beans. Alas, they don't know what pork and beans are over here. No wonder they are content to grovel along under Ihe despotic heel of monarchy. Boston is one of the most ancient boroughs in England, and time was when it was also one of the richest, for in 1 lit)t when King John ordered a tax on merchants, there was only one other city in the kingdom that paid in to the crown a larger sum than Boston, and that was London, and only �~yi) more at that. But the ancient glory of the city has departed. Where once was carried on a busy and lucrative trallic, with vessels sailing out across the seas in all directions, there rcmaineth only the sleepy reminders of trade.  The general flavor of mild decay is over everything. In a former letter 1 have alluded to an old-time saint known as Cuthbert.   At about his period there likewise flourished St. Botolph, -who-was-highl\-es teemed-as._ a-patran.-sainui f sailors, to which is attributed the fact that St. Botolph's churches arc invariably built near to the water.   It was in 0111 that Botolph founded an abbey here, which abbey was destroyed in 870 by those troublesome and constantly recurring Danes.   I am glad I wasn't alive during the ninth century, for had I been, I should surely have hated those Danes-and I hold that it isn't right for a man to hate anybody.   But it would have been very difficult not to hate a Dine who was constantly going about with a torch in one hand touching off meeting-houses, and a sword in the other that he was perpetually sticking into anybody that happened to he handy.  One Dane iu a neighborhood who was robust and not troubled with dyspepsia was enough to tear down the whole toctat uud ecclesiastical fabric.  Next to a skunk I don't know of anything more uncomfortable than a Dane. J'KUII.S OT COX V Mils ATI ON. But they don't have skunks in England. Fancy a country with beeratthiee cents a glass and no skunks. The other day I fell into conversation with a young lady who sat opposite to. me in the ears. She was u very beautiful young lady, with rosy English cheeks, and a Hashing English eye-two flashing English eyes, in fact-supplemented and abetted by a most bewitching manner. She was a trustful and conliding thing, uud was going to Bromptou to meet her papa, she said.  She always liked to meet Americans, But as I was starting out to. say, when the young lady interrupted me, this same St. Botolph is the derivation of Boston of today, for it is but a natural and logical transition from "St. Bololph's town" to "Bottlestown," and so to "Boston ;" and when we remember that our own New England metropolis takes ' its name from this old Lincolnshire seaport, the philological evolution is fraught with no small degree of interest to us all. The  Massachusetts puritans originated in these parts, and the famous John Cotton, who was vicar iu this very town, followed the first settlers across the sea because he was too good a man to comply with the odious religious foims that Archbishop Laud sought to foist upon the country.    We are apt to say hard things about the Stuarts, and hold them up to contumely as a race of monarchs ot whom too much time is reproachful could not be said ; but for my part I think they should be looked upon at times with a trifle of thankfulness, as being in a large measure responsible for the sterling character that was infused into the earliest.New England emigration.   But for the persecutions that sent these educated Englishmen to seek new homes across the seas; there is no telling just what life with us in "the states" today would hc--indccd, under what circumstances we who trace our descent from those early English adventurers would today be existing (if existing at all) is a speculation that well might appall the most indefatigable r investigator of the ineffable. But these hardy men of Lincolnshire went forth, founded new homes, aud when the proper time came, their descendants culinlj' cut adrift from" England's royal apron-strings. This is not a bran-new historical nugget that I have come across myself-I only throw it in in a general sort of way, to let my readers kuow that I am familiar with the great truths of history. It is little touches like this that win a writer reputation for being erudite. 1 like to be thought erudite. I think it is nice. r � So it falls out that a great many pcoplo who come from Boston in America, like to visit Boston in England, and the people of this latter place arc always glad to see people from the former place-their child across the water, as thcyjilfectionately term her. Now Boston in England is a place of perhaps L"i,00(J souls. 1 have seen other mothers whose children had enormously outgrown them. an    mnoi.isii   1*a 111. �j It was f,ur day when we iirst thrust our distinguished presence upon the city, aud the big market-place was filled with booths of every sort, from which their owners dispensed to the constantly moving populace all kinds of limey goods and vegetables and (heap jewelry and fish.   Nearly every country town has its market days, on which occasion the people from ! miles around flock in, bringing produce of every de.-ciiption mid stock of every sort; and these are sold to whoever may buy. while the. money in turn finds its way into the tills of the various booths.    Besides these everyday prosiuc features of buying and selling, there is usually some amusement rife, such as llying-horses and "Aunt Rally" aud games of chance, and like hilarious adjuncts of the country fair. It is one unending round of jollity, besides the beer, which hi itself is no small source of enjoyment to those who fancy it, Iain told. We strolled up and down the open spaces -l>etAveon-the-.huiJthi.auil-e-njoye^Uthe~new-ue-8s"Of--~ the experience-for we have nothing in our country like these English market days. "Arc  you   buying potatoes, gentlemen r' shouted a red-faced young man who was superintending a booth devoted  to that popular beverage. We �huok our heads.   We had no place to put any potatoes if we bought them. "Some line ones at a bargain," the brisk young man  insinuatingly added, waving a hand over his stock. But we steeled ourselves to his imporlunitie s and shoved along. "Are you buying bonnets " screamed a sandy-complexioned female from an adjoining booth, wherein was displayed a most prepos" terous collection of low-priced millinery. I think ths sandy-eoniplcxioned female must have inferred from our looks that we were gentlemen given to uxoriousness, for she held up to our inspection a pair of cheap bounets trimmed with huge green bows, and said iu a wheedling voice: % "Buy the pretty bonnets,   gentlemen, t for your wives." "I haven't any wives," said the Judge. "Me uutuer," I added, iu strict conformity to the local vernacular. At the next place the Judge bought some taffy.   It was homemade taffy, with something * of a burnt flavor, and just enough sand in it to give the teeth a linn grip and prevent the taffy slipping down your throat and choking she added, thev were always so jolly nice. \ you to death. The woman who sold it said Then she smiled and showed her pretty teeth, j she made it from a recipe .that had been in her while I arranged my necktie and adjusted my 1 moustache aud neglected to tell her that I was family "for years, and then she smote the mass with a stick she used to drive off dogs with. 21   

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