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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: June 13, 1885 - Page 1

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Publication: Independent Junior

Location: Bath, Maine

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - June 13, 1885, Bath, Maine                                J^IST   OZR,IQ-I2sT.A.IJ   DOWlsT-EAST   WEEKLY. VOL. VI. BATH, ME., JUXE 13, 1885. NO. 27. The Purest Possible I NEQUASSET ICE For City Consumption. Having concluded contracts villi the Arctic Ice-Co., and llic Knox & Lincoln Uuilroutl, for Five Years, we are. plcitBcd to announce that wc shall he able to furnish, at Krtnil or Wholesale, the trade and citizens ur Bath with I'UUE KKtjUASSKT ICE for the season of lSSft. Itntcs Low and orders reaped fully solicited. Teams with competent and accomodating driven* will deliver Ice, on and after April 4, 1�S.'>, to any part of the city. ^        Orders may be left at Tlios. II. G. Harris' Store; K. XV. T,�rniliee's OIHce or K. II. Turner's Market. IRA MASON & SONS. PHOTOGRAPHS Made and Finished in all the Leading Styles Ground PIooj STUDIO, BATH, MAINE. HIGGIN'S CKC1MA CONCERT. New Invoices FLOUR, RUIT, VERMONT BUTTER EGETABLES. L ARGE OT -A XI)- Oranges -AT- J. B. WORTH'S TRY THE TROY LAUNDRY FOR FINE WORK The Ladles Musical Circle Harmonizes at Winter St Chapel. Fashionable and Entertaining Musi-pale. For the instruction anil enlightenment of those who were not present we may say that the mtisicale by the ladies of the St. Cecilia club of this city, held at Winter street chapel on Wednesday evening last, was one of the most pleasing society events of the half year past. The little chapel was filled with friends of the participating Cecilias, -Messrs. tl.  �'  HOI KI.AMI coiiiiki[-<:a7.i:ttk. SHOWING  ist  HOW   TWO  YANKEES CROSSED   THE OCEAN. "Dash dash your dash dashed dash to ; necked bottle that  peeped out of one dash," In-   yells, "why didn't you go coat pocket and seemed to mean busi- aronnd us-dash dash you!" ntss.   Tliey found him packed into a This, amid the whistling of the wind peculiarly intricate corner in the steer-and the other noises with which the oc- age, and he tool; bis apprehension very easion is pregnant has the eflect of vast- philosophically.   He had to. ly stimulating the men on the sloop-1 "What will you do with them, cap-have noticed that profanity will always tain?" I asked of an underling who stood and brilliant pianists of more than ordi- How a Steamer Gets Ready for Sea- [ travel farther and be heard more dis- nearby. l*d never been on a P.ritish nary talent and culture, and added laurels     � " "       1 to her reputation by her superb playing Mrs. Patten's solo was carefully and pleasingly rendered.   The tiio we thought tin- finest that we have even listened to. The three ladies, each a talented soloist, played their best with satisfactory results both to the audience and themselves. Mrs. I lowland's solo composition and evinced  U k jour dash blanked ..Lot evident.   The music was executed with   , .        .    ,   ,   ,    T      "ihead.   he yells, lumping up and down Mrs. Howland's well known ease and l,,at covera lhu wl,:irf of tlle Innl!ln ! and sereumin" in excess of ra�r-power and was given a very Mattering; Steamship Co. Crowding past the two j don,( y(Mj h.i(iI jn yom. ^ round ol applause. j Irish women who tempted us no less by ! |)()0Illi"   jj,.iu] ji j,  it ,i Miss Low's voice seemed in.excellent, honeyed words than the display of their >     i condition, and she managed it in skilllul, I    .. ,       . ,      .    ,    i    . painstaking stvie. The foncs were clear. ! ycllow warcs t� !�rt:ike at a fixed rate sweet and fully rounded, and the lady's j of their sour oranges, we entered upon a manner simply unassuming. Her song; busy scene. Day and night for more was one of the best of the numbers and j lh.ln a W(ek ,r0!lt |){Xiius ,,f ,,,., |,.,i aroused much cutlmsiasm at the close.      i . . .   " . ,     .     ,        ,   .  ,. ... . .     , ... ..   been packing into the steamer s hold For ourselves we enjoved Miss Gilbert s | 1        " selection as much as any number on the | every conceivable variety of mcrchan- in your dasli  ( in! Haul  it 'n. dash blank your dash dash (lashed  to dash!" I don't think I ever was present on any occasion when the beatifies of profanity were more charming and efficaciously exemplified, although I have been in Chicago several times and in my day have seen a number of circus trains tin programme.   Miss Gilbert ranks with the i disc, and were now .putting the finishing |().ul(,u    'p1|C boom ,lfle|. r\w\n, ti, best of our Maine pianists and her selec- j touches to their labors, alwavs in rarest   taste.   This' iano Duct. Vocal Solo, iano Solo, ocal Solo. i'akt skcom). (juarlettc.   I.a Carita. Stylisb Furnishings -FOIl- i  cd white silk thrown aside in front disclosing a skirt of lace llounces. Miss Low wore a white cashmere   and satin  combination Miss Swanton a very stylish dark wine colored silk with train. The programme was given very smoothly lis above- except the exchanging of their numbers by Mrs. Drake and Airs. Patten Mrs. .Drake giving her solo in part 1 Owing to the  length of the programme no  encores  were given.   Kach number was warmly applauded. Miss Miissenden Mrs. Duncan, Miss Low and Miss Patten receiving  encores to which acknowledg incuts were bowed, ami Mrs. Duncan was given, alter her number, a handsome hoti quel ot Jacqueminot roses. The opening chorus was sung with snap and perlect blending of all the voices. Mrs. Hughes, though not in her best voice, sang very sweetly. Miss Newman chose lor her solo a piece of great difficulty in which she displayed great ability. Mrs. Drake sang very prettily, her voice being clear and sweet, and showing pains taken in its culture. Miss Mnssemlcii played without notes a very.pretty and catching polonaise Her thorough training was evident, ami beside much acquired skill through study showed that she lions are always in rarest taste number filled the whole room with rich harmony. It was a most scholarly and talented interpretation of the author's work. The concluding trio was magnificent, as a gentleman remarked after the entertainment "It was alone worth the price ol admission." As a whole the ladies of the Cecilia Club should be encouraged by this rare treat, which they gave their appreciative friends on Wednesday evening, to continue these musicales from time to time. The money from admissions might be made prite a respectable charity fund. Hacks laden cat- Thc Farmer and the I'ditor. Seems to me you don't have notion' to do." said a farmer, walking into the sanctum of the editor, the other day. 'Well I have worked on a farm a good deal in my life, and 1 regard editing a so-called humorous paper as harder work than plowing corn." the editor replied. "Oh, shucks!" exclaimed the farmer: 'If I didn't have nothing to do hut sit around and write a little, ami shear a good deal, I tell ye I'd be bavin' a mighty easy time." 'I'll tell you what I'll do," said the editor, "I'll plow corn a day lor you. if you'll write two columns to-day for me." "Done," cried the farmerr ".And III bet you ten dollars you can't write two columns to-ilav for inc.' eningly along with prospective tourists and their friends j )je;nK unsl,ip|)(, were arriving and departing. At the forward gangway were grouped little knots i>{ steerage passengers, bound back to the old country, some to visit old friends, others, not perhaps success- fill in theirgrazing in pasturesnc.v, lo go ; ^ ^.^"of ^tne' history no more abroad forever.   It was princi- j of bpne(liction pally merriment here, though occasionally a moistened eye was seen as some old man   again in trembling accents, , my lrip ,jej     llopL,k,ssly pl.0Sll,Ul,, ,,y voiced loving messages to the dear ones j lhe    ,     enJ of afifl   lon g, in the home beyond the sea whom he the steamer's side, and and striving in vain to drag the sloop's mast out by the roots, finally clears itself and the vessel and its frightened crew drift slowly away. A sailor reports no further damage than i port thrust open, the pilot repeats a by way and everybody I think easier.   At least  I do, for I ! breathes sendin' of 'em hashore." I breathed freer after that. A   it.w (ll'KMXC  SCKXKs. From the elevation of the main deck we could study the steerage passengers who were walking about and bestowing themselves into comfortable altitudes on the deck below. They were dressed in a variety of costumes, none of them particularly clean or pretty. There was about l.">0 of litem in all. The number of such passengers recrossing to the old country is small, and these mostly fi>r purposes of visiting. It is on the American passage that steerage life in its 'horror- I think I use the word advisedly - is manifested. Think of one thousand people-on her last trip this steamer brought hi-crowded into what at best arc narrow confines below decks, and possibly ninety-nine of every one hiin-I dred seasick at once. There's a strength i of purpose and stomach in the people agin. An' I'll bet yer leu dol-ycr can't plow as much a< ycr was destined nevermore to see. Amid it all, active merchants plied their trade in articles of bedding and dishes of tin needful to the steerage voyage, while unshaven parties rushed perspiringly aliout and sought to sell the cabin passengers not previously supplied the inevitable and extremely necessary steamer chair. At the after gangway these most happy cabin passengers themselves were tripping lightly aboard, under surveillance of a lynx-eyed official, accompanied by such friends as wished to see them as much as possible bclore they finally cut adrift from everything American. Amid all this community of good feeling the Judge and 1 were not forgotten. Valued friends, some from home, had at much personal discomfort come down to . who brave a steerage passage to reach have no fancy for the very incipiency of1 ,,     ,,   .     .. ,,     , , ,,  , j j     � i|ie al]Urmg fields of America t_u,at wc who are pampered in the lap of luxury little comprehend. There were several nationalities represented here-Germans, English,Danes, Scotchmen, Irish chiefly. Short black pipes were numerous and in instant re- KAIlil.V  AWAY. So now, by aid of a perspiring tug, we are backed into clear water and the ship's nose is turned fairly to sea.   The blackened end of the wharf still gleams j quisition, while the friendly bottle was white with the fluttering good-byes of1 not lacking and went on its mission of loving friends. We steam slowly past sociability. There was one man with a the wharves of the metropolis with their ! very still' hat, a most comprehensive thick linings of shipping, down the bay. ! woolen neck mulller, and an expression "Done :irs more orter." 'I lake you," the editor replied. 'What am I to write about?" -< Hi. anything, so its funny.   Iicm  sanctum blithe and cheerful. The farmer sat at the desk, vexed and worried into anger. '-How-do yoii feel?" -ar-ked the editor. "I'sed up.'   Hardest day's work I ever done, an" two lines ter show fer it." Sure enough he was but one line beyond  the  head-line.    That  line   read: �Killiu' tater-bugs is funny." Then I've won the wager." "Yes, but I reckon I've won t'other 'mi" No. sir!   I have won both.   I  have plowed several acres of corn, and done it well, and I've written my two column-, besides." 'Creation!   llow'd ye do it?" -Just like you would.   I hired a man to do the plowing, and I satin the shade: but I wrote while I sal there, and did not sleep us you do.   Fork over the twenty." The farmer paid twenty dollars fur his information, but the lesson was well learned, ami as he went out he said: 'Stranger, I would not be an editor if I It looks mighty easy, but, by y as set tin" the shade, an' watchiu their hands shake the fraternal hand and bid us God speed, and thus relieve the harshness of our departure. These we took down into the confines of lhe slcatncr and introduced lo such of the appointments of our prospective ocean home as we had at the lime become familiar with. "We sail at 11, do we not'J' the Judge asked of the very busy and soinewlial exasperated baggage-master, who was doing i\ thousand things with one hand and answering a thousand questions at the same time with the other, and preserving his equilibrium through it all in a way that would have won him undying plaudits as a dispenser of government patronage. "At eleven if the Lord is willing-twelve anyhow,'' was the terse reply. Volumes could not have said less. As a final act of leave taking two immense vans tilled with hundreds of sacks CLTTIXG  Al.nXd. When we arrived on deck again the rain had recommenced falling, and a number of very venturesome sailors, entirely without umbrellas, were up on the yards making everything snug, as wesay. The pilot with several of the gold-l.teed  officers   was   industriously of consummate, woe depicted on his features. (Jut of his right hand coat pocket peeped a long-necked bottle such as men used to sell port wine in before; llio .Maine Law was passed. It was :i very inviting looking bottle. Even from where I stood, and reared as 1 have been in a land of Puritanic associations, I could see that.  Occasionally the man's treading the bridge and keeping an eye, out, but I don't know what for, unless it ! Iliintl WHllla f;l" "l�traetedty "Pon til* which : place where the neck of that long-necked short,a momentary might be the Kussian corvette, A Fine Line of Nobby Spring Hats at BICCINS BROS' No Old Stock, but Bran New Goods at Low Prices at BIGGINS BROS OLD ANDERSON STORE. the little lady showed that slie pos  sses true musical talent.   She put her sou. into j ,.,,),) the instrument  and when she arose the i ,      ' ,      .... audience gave termite an ovation for lierj J'T*"''"""- 11      t "C!"' s" ���< performance.   Mrs^Hyde appears always!1" to advantage, ami Wednesday evening ' plow'.u' corn. I am a fool, an" ycr can was no exception.   Her solo was well ren-j say so in yer next paper if ycr want to." dered and received.   The duet by Misses j �--- -- Morse and Owen was given with great j    Secretary  Manning has  awarded power and skill bv these ladies who have |__ � , ,,     ____,  .   u . ,    .-  , 1    .   ,     .,   .--     i ...   ...    gold medal to Marcus A. Hauna. light- no rivals qii the Kennebec as pianists. Miss . f " lio.n.TH in her difficult selection did admir- i ,,OU4e keeper at Cape Lhzabeth. Me., for heroic conduct in rescuing two persons -the only survivors-from the wreck of the schooner Australia, Jan. 28, 1880, Kogers in her difficult selection did admir ably, showing increasing abilities in 0[ier-atic song.   Miss K. wc think lias made great progress  within the year in her! musical studies. " Miss Morse executed i     ,       ,,     , , , ..     ,.     ,   , Tarantelle in a manner that iras as near and a g�ld mc(,al �� Corncl,U8 l^""' perfection in touch, rytliui and execution Bcstor for brarery in rescuing from as possible. j drowning several persons at different Miss   Patten made  a charming little times in the year 1883 and 1881 of foreign nlaildrive up and are uiila.len. !(k,licit),ly anJ .in()Ilvmously has been lurking in North Kivcr for sev- j oral days, awaiting a declaration of war, \ that she might rush forth and prey upon j [the liritish marine, under whose llag wc j now are domiciled. I |    In the huge and hand-'ome saloon arc ' ! displayed   a   number   of magnificent! lloivcr pieces  -a full rigged ship of n.it- , ural roses, a gb'anlie crown and oilier I pieces of unique design.   What thought-j fill friends had sent tbcin to us I could mil   divine.   1 asked  the  Judge.   He, said he couldn't, nuther.   liul there they j were, there vvas no gainsaying thai, so | we accepted them with gratitude and j said a blessing for the giver.  We let lhem remain in lhc saloon for lhe oilier pass- ; engers to enjoy.   It was a princely testimonial and we vowed that its memory would be unto us as a sweet smelling savor long after llowers and  roses had faded into dust.   It is little acts like this, performed, from home and the blue shitted sailors, shouldering these corpulent sacks, hear them away into the netbertuoa depths of the steamer's internals. Well, the lime has at length arrived. The lasl warning bell has been rung, the last good bye and lingering clasp of | joyoU/ S;ive a fl.w'whosu te:irs an, the hand exchanged,   the hist bridge | nol Jel repl.essi.l]i 1)()1V eloquent that lenders one's depaitm peculiarly sweet and touching. There was no one on hoard we The foreign element in the obtained to what struck us as a surprising degree'.   Everybody was happv and sobs, testi- hatiled ashore, the lust irrational passen- j m0I,y t0 Uie grief of recent separation, ger who has shot ashore to buy a banana j -p|)e pl,rser, a burly, happy, red-faced specimen of a well-fed, jolly Englishman, forked aboard by the waste material of his garments to an accompaniment of jeers and profanity, and the ignominious loss of the banana which drops into the water just as he is pantingly hauled over the side, nnd with a jingling of hells and a hissing of escaping steam the huge steamship, at 'precisely seven minutes past eleven o'clock, backs slowly from her moorings. A cheer goes up from the deck and is answered from the wharf. Everybody waves something. It is nn inspiriting moment. The crowd follows  along   the wharf and thickly 'bollIT; began lo grow gleam of  pleasant recollection   would slide over his face, and he would bile lhe neck of the bottle for at: instant, and restore the bottle to the right hand coal pocket most carefully.   After this pro-cess, bad several times been repelled lhe light of woe gave place lo an expression of great hilarity, in lhc continuance of which the man with the woolen mulller retired  with sundry   congenial   spirits behind the foremast, where the neck of the  long-necked    bottle   was    several times fraternally bitten with subdued but rapturous applause.    I hailed this as a i pleas mt conclusion of the little drama I of which 1 had been an amused spocla-| tor, and was totally dumbfounded when ' a few moments later I discovered the i owner of the long-necked bottle silting 1 disconsolately and  alone upon a coil of | freshly tarred rigging, stilVused in tears land miserably wipiag his eyes with the ; frayed-out  ends  of his  mulller.   Poor I fellow-I do not know what ailed him. , Possibly the recollections of home had with    overmastering   force, he had discovered  when too late that it does not do to call in disinterested friends to bile the end of a long-necked bottle whose contents are intended to eke out the discomforts of a long and tedious voyage. knew st cabin 1 returned Perhaps aided by  another officer or two, was passing the steerage passengers under a rope on the lower deck and inspecting their tickets, this opportunity being econ-onii/.ed by other officials in searching tlle by-places of the sh'p for stowaways, a creature familiar to every voyage of every  ocean  steamer.   Nor   was  this search entirely unsuccessful, . for pres-! enlly these ferreting ollicials came hal-j ing before the slern-visaged purser-that I is, he would have looked stern-visaged il he could-two of the son iest looking hats, parasols and | wl.el(.,1M you em. s;lw waving   madly  all the covers its extremitie handkerchief while. As we back into the channel a brick laden schooner essays to put across our stern, mis-slays in the uncertain wind and drifts down helpless upon us. The pilot, a heavy party in a stout pea jacket, from his coign of vantage on the bridge, is equal to the emergency. ill smouehed and daubed with grime, whom they had resurrected from the black and unearthly depths of the coal-bunkers, and in whose eyes quivered and from the grimy lineaments of whose faces shown the evidences of abject fear. There was another party, an individual with a shiny grip-sack, a bald head fringed with struggling locks^ of gray and a long: MAIDKX KMOTIUXS Three miles outside Sandy Hook bar a light trim craft bears down upon us to l:ike away our pilot, a still' wind meantime prevailing. A small boat manned by two amphibious mousters in oiled clothing puts alongside. The stowaways are there, looking a little more chipper than when I saw them last and evidently disposed to regard it all as a very pleasant joke. The sea was very boisterous, and the small boat lunged fearfully against the steamer's side and only was save from annihilation by the great skill of the rowers. I had been waiting for this opportunity. I couldn't conceive how a man could swear so dreadfully, so ostentatiously as that pilot had been doing, and go unpunished. I felt certain he would be drowned when lie essayed to get down into that tossing boat, nnd T got a position where I shouldn't miss a note of it.  The stowa-   

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