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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: November 3, 1883 - Page 1

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - November 3, 1883, Bath, Maine                                VOL. IV. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1883. NO. 48. D. O. FOYE & CO., Wholosnle and Retail Dealers iu STAPLE AND FANCY JWAlso full Stock Fresh MenU dally ro ccived. THE PLACE To Buy Staple and. Fancy GROCERIES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES! IJJiUk JAMES B. DRAKE, Insurance Broker. -DE.YLEIt IIC- Pressed Hay and Ice. GRANITE BLOCK, BATH, ,'    MAINE. ORDER YOUR PROVISIONS -AT- Russell's Market Wlici'u ��ay hi- found at all times a Fine- Assortment of Meats, Vegetables, Goun-tiy Produce,______ Aud everything UBunlly found tn a First-Class Market. WALTER S. RUSSELL, 146 FRONT ST. AUCTION SALES. Monday and Wednesday Evenings, At 7 O'cloclc. Uiim\ Bazaar, Froirst., ijole Eli.' ES^All Good Sold at Private Sale during the week at Auction Prices. S. J. GOLDSTEIN, Auctioneer. THE BEES -Ql.VE A- SUPPER For the bcnclU of the POOR of the City, at CITY HALL, TUESDAY, NOV. 6. -ALSO AX- ENTERTAINMENT consisting of Longfellow's poem "The Blind Oirl of Uustle Ouillc," illustrated. Singing by Mulo Quartette. flipper served from fi to 10 8 o'clock. Entertainment nt Contributions for Refreshment Tabic solicited. ADMISSION 15 CENTS. ALL WALTZ. S. L. FARRAR, Would respectfully call Ilic attention of I ho people of Until to his large ami varied slock of'first class STOVES & RANGES WhM> \v':l! be soltl ulioap as the cheapest, and warranted nt* ri prcBfiitutl in every uas�e. 1 have in my h to rep ;i full tine uf the Celebrated New Hub Ranges Which stands unrivalled us the BKST RANGE OP Til IC TIMES. Cull and examine its wonderful Keflex Grate mid Oscillating Oven Bbelf and Largo Oven. I shall also, for the Fall Trado, have n lurgi' and varied stock of I0LEOANT l'AIC-I.OR Bl'liVICS and will .-endeavor to suit all Jo] Price and (Quality. .. .-^.| Jobbing and House Work Promptly attend od to by competent workmen. Center Street, near City Hall. FALL GOODS -AND- Overcoats, THICK SUITS, ETC., Made to Order, Stylishly, Reasonably, and Durably, -AT- SNOW'S. Dedicated to tht Phi Ithos and Lady Friends, by Richard. The whish and roar of the gale without, Make merriment greater within; And the diamonds shot their rays about As if dancing weren't a sin. O the cold and the rain and the wind without, And the warmth and beauty within! The sparkling eyes and pretty Hps' pout, And lasses for lads to win. O'er the oaken floor whirl satined feet, And mo pulses warm throb high; While beauty and strength to the waltz's beat, Now paused, now seemed to fly. The color in dress and sparkling gems Combine- in a picture rare; And tho chandeliers, like diadems, Flash in the perfumed air. Oh the joy there is in tho rhythmic glide Over the polished floor; In your arms some fresh fair llosc or Lidc, While Cupid above doth soar. The rustling silks and 'vancing feet Tho whispered words so low! The brush of robes as couples meet, Mark time with tho tingling bow.j What it' the arms more tightly rest On the waists of maidens gay ? Or fair brow falls on the broadcloth breast ? Youth's glare so soon fades gray! Bright flash the eyes; let fair cheeks bloom, All waltz till break of day; There's time full soon for dull, black gloom To shroud youth's pleasures gny. ALL  HALLOWEEN. How Celebrated la This Hamlet. At the Grace Church chapel a very pleasant Halloween party was given the Sunday school children Wednesday night, games and tricks with refreshment of cake and ice cream serving to( make the time pass quickly. At the High school Hall the Phi Rhos gave a social dance to the High School girls. Brooks trio furnished the music. About twenty-live couples tripped the light fantastic. The girls looked very pretty and stylish to our youth who dropped in at eleven. There were ten dances on the programme with two extras and, the party broke up at midnight. THE BUSY B'S OUR JACK Wants to Know- Why Bath can't build iron ships ? Why tho Central and Winter street churches can't unite ? Why tho Skating Rink company arc obliged to put up a tablet in honor of a local millionaire ? Why some of our wealthy residents who have handsome homes won't give re ceptions this winter ? Why Harry took away his arm so quickly ? Why it wouldn't pay to build a cotton mill at the rope-walk or in Winnegancc ? Why a couple of Bath misses loaf so much about the P. O. and railway station Why scamps recently disfigured A. G. Page's fence? Why some ot our clergymen can't, once in a while, preach half hour sermons? "Why a handsome block of tenements am't.put up?---:  Why-one of our local doctors � doesn't know everything that is worth knowing? Why the pretty, winsome Bees don't like beaux ? - For the Ixdei'kxdp.xt. IN MEMORIAM- Hope for Success. Editor Independent :�- It is hoped that the supper and entertainment given by the Bees at City Hall next Thursday evening will be well a_t-_ tended. The object of the society, as is well known, is to assist needy families in the cityi-'v,l}y means of tho fund obtained from the Art Loan last year, m6re than a dozen families were helped by donations of clothing, bedding, rent and fuel. This year tho society is desirous of obtaining as large a fund- as possible, in order to carry on their work which they will bo very glad to enlarge, and which is certainly Worthy of bur contribution. B.B. B. Robert F. Patten, the author of the following verses, was once a resident of the state, but left his home in early life to seek his fortune in the South. Alter residing about twenty-five years in Louisiana he was struck down by the yellow fever, while ministering to the sick during the terrible epedemic of 1807. The following is taken from an obituary notice in the Louisiuni Mcridinal, of Vermillion Parish, Oct. 10, 1807: "Robert Francis Patten was bom in Chatl.am Co., North Carolina, October 1819, and while yet in his infancy was taken by his lather, Mr. John Patten, a native oflNcw England, to Bowdoinhani, Maine, where he was brought up and educated. In 1812 he arrived in Franklin, La., whore he soon attracted the attention of the more intelligent and influential portion of the citizens of that once wealthy couimunity, and under their auspices he opened a large and flourishing school. Many of his pupils have since occupied respectable positions in society, and some of them have honored various offices ot trust, and the halls of legislation. "In 18-1,5 Mr. Patten married Miss Phtibc Birdzall of Franklin, and subsequently settled in this place, wheie in 1848, ho was licensed by the Supreme Court as an attorney and counsellor at law, and at the time of his death was enjoying, a successful and lucrative practice in this Judicial District, and he was generally successful in all his cases. All the poor class who resorted to him forlegal advice, never came away disappointed on account of lack of pecuniary means to satisfy him, which was one reason of his great popularity. He was generous to a fault; rich and poor being alike welcome at his hospitable home ami lie never sought to make invidious distinction between them. In 18.55 Mr. Patten was elected to the House of Representatives of this state from this pat-teh, 'and served in that body till the beginning of the late troubles. "In It*;!1), lie-vehemently opposed the secession movement on natural principles, as an unwise ami impractible scheme, and with wonderful political acumen, lie predicted all the innumerable evils and calamities that have since fallen upon our beloved 'sunny south.' Mr. Patten was naturally a social and courteous gentleman; his discourses always abounding in sallies of humorous wit. lie was a writer of no common, talent and many of his fugitive pieces have the ring of the true poet.1' SPUING. Sweet spring lias come!-around us breathes The spirit of her genial spell; Bright beauty's forms fur earth she wreaths, And wakens music's joyous swell. Now bends the sky o'er earth with hue As mild as smile on pleasure's face; And bland and balmy zephyr's woo Us to their soft and sweet embrace. And see! with what meek, fair-hued flowers Is decked the grove and sunny glade; How smile the forest's leafy bowel's, And the upspringing, grassy blade. And, hark ! the air resounds with notes Of happy birds'sweet melody; Unnumbered, differing, tuneful throats Are breathing nature's minstrelsy. So fair earth's vernal bloom and light,- So filled with nil that's sweet and gay,- We might almost believe its blight, For sin of man, had passed away. The gentle spring!-oh, it does tune The heart's soft passion-harp to.loy, And leads the spirit to commune With thoughts unmixed with earth's alloy. It speaks of that cxhaustless love Which flows from the blest throne on high; Encircling all beneath, above, In its divine immensity. And, oh! it brings, to faith's pure sight, A higher and eternal spring, Where tiowers of love are always blight. And birds of peace forever siag. George F. Barstow, of San Franscfsco, who left an estate valued nt $80,000, gave these injunctions in his will: "Having observed that ostentation aud expensivo funerals are injurious to the people, often absorbing money which poverty cannot well spare to vanity and pride, thorofore, by way of example, for which I beg pardon of the undertakers, let my coffin be a plain redwood box put together with common nails or screws., without paint or varnish, with playi iron handles, and all else about tho funeral to correspond with this plainness. Lot there be a cheap shroud nml .no flowers. What is a dead man but a handful of dust? Instead of a hoarse I may just as well be carried to the grave upqn some ordinary vehiolo in every-day use, since life is but a journey and the day of death the final rest. LOVE AND FAME. Chambers* Journal* The poet's soul that hath the honey pressed From man and life. On eager wings had gone to seek her rest Far from earth's strifo. EVunc said to I.ove:  "The poet's soul Is mine. 'Tin mine to bring to my eternal fields the voice divine That thus could sing." Love answered :  "Though thy claim I now confess, ' i'wns I did give Ills verses all the lire anil gracefulness Whcrcbv they live."^ CLOVER. Chicago Inter Ocean. Oh clover bloom of rare perfume, Nodding tho wide Held over; One glorious Jnnc, one happy moon Comes wlili your brentli, sweet clover. Oh, swaring stems ef crimson gems, Willi fragrant sweets low bending. You bring to me, o'er sorrow's sea, . Love's joy and love's sad ending. Yes, love is dead and joy lias lied, Oh, honey laden clover,        _ But wllli"your breath t vanquish death And live that sweet lime over. MAINE MATTERS INDEPENDENT ITEMS. EDITORIAL DOTS ^orne; dTRoBerfJoktnjr BurdetterS; Squibs from the Ha-.vkeye. A Georgia woman has just finished a bed quilt containing 1.000 yards of thread and 2,4.00 patches. The quilt has also just about Gnisbcd the woman. Robert Browning is writing a new poem. He has threatened to make it more unintelligible than any previous effort. Have no fear, timid reader. He can't do it. Frederic Douglass wants the negro elevateil to the vice presidency. Bless your heart, Frederic, that's no elevation. There isn't a smaller office, in^ the United State?. The fiftieth anniversary Is called a golden'' wedding, because it takes about all of a man's life-time to find it. It's a big thing when you get to it, but finding it is about as uncertain as pocket mining. One-tenth of the population of the Jnited States is German. By and by Kaiser Wilhelm will have to come over here to look for his empire. Well, tho old man wouldn't make a bad presidcut. But he couldn't catch a hatfnll of the prohibition vole. Ben Butler says he "has made his own way In -the world because he lived on a farm when he was a boy." That's^abont it. If a boy eouldnV learn to throw stones with accuracy andl fury on a Massachusetts farm, it wouldn't be for lack of raw material. It-is, indeed, a living wonder that the boy could ever learn anything else. "Yes,'' the tall thin pissenger admitted, "a crying baby is indeed a sore trial. But then yon must remember that- the baby cannot swear, and when a human being is being dandled up and down on the loose end of a two-inch safety-pin, its got to do something, and if it can't sweir it must holler." And the jury was only out two minutes and came in with a verdict for defendant. About the-midil!"' of October there is to be a "fly casting tournament" in New York, in which there will be contests in salmon, bass and trout easting. It may he all tight, hut it seems to us the proper time for a fly casting tournament would be about the middle of July, when a man with a steady hand could stand at the cream jug and cast flies nil over the dining-room. Still, wo suppose the professional fly casters prefer cooler weather, when the Hies are more sluggish. -     ----��)- -    - -The D;ep Meaning of Pot-Hooks. Full accounts of this early wriiing will be found in two delightful volumes, just published by Mr. Isaac Taylor, on 'The Alphabet. "I dare say most of your cadets have seen them. Mr. Taylor literally leaves no stone unturned to illustrate his subject; and as he traces all our western systems of writing to Egyptian hieroglyphics, its vastness is apparent. I confess I like to think that my crabbed pot-hooks have in them certain elements in common with the wonderful letters inscribed on the monuments of the Nile valley six thousand years ago or more, if,'jt is not heretical to say so. When we write gte-it A, it seems we represent the recti pen of the old Egyptian scribe; when we write little a we represent a foot. And so on through most of our moiUrn alphabet. G i3 the basket or ark in which young Moses was set afloat, the "setoff " or "seraph," as printers call it, being the handle. L is a couching lion. M is an owl. F is the crested serpent by which Cleopatra was stung to death, and Z is an ordinary snake. If your readers should think I am in jest, they have only to refer to other things quite as wonderful. On a steamer recently arrived from abroad during the prevailing high seas, a traveler exclaimed to his very stylish, but just then pale and distressed-looking daughter: "What, Grace, yoti seasick!" Looking around at the rest of the company hugging the rails, she faltered out: 'Y-y-yon don't s-s-suppose, papa, I'd be out-off-f-fashion, do you?-Me to York Commcrciul. The dying man faltered. "I wish"- he murmured \ and the weeping roerr-bcrs of the family who were about his bedside bent down moro closely to catch his last desire. "I wish," he said again; the words coming slowly and with t)itli-culty-"I wish I could bo spared and strength given roe for one brief half-hour, and if I didn't just wallop that fiend who is playing.that hand-organ out on our curbstone, I'd give up, and die willingly."-Lowell Citizen. Tho management of the Eastern Maine Fair have decided upon Sept. 0th to 12lh inclusive, as the four days upon which to hold the fair in 1881. Twenty-five men are at work on the Maine State fairgrounds in Lewiston. Tho grounds will be made to exceed any of the kind in New England in attractiveness. A man named Sanders, lending hoisting gear near the edge of the quarry pit at Brownville, fell 120 feet striking on the rock at the bottom causing almost instant death. A State officer has been looking for a man taking life insurance in Camden and other places, for the Wakefield, Mass., Mutual Association without a license, but failed to find him. Fryeburg abounds in Indian skeletons. Several years ago one was found npar the Oxford House. The other day, another was found two feet under ground, in an orchard, according to the liridglon Ncw.-t. A lady has taken the field against the rum shops in Bangor. As a result of :herrx-ffoi ts s^'eral .^iziires --liavb- beon-made recently. Saturday one of Bangor's gilded groggeries was raided upon successfully, at her instigation. During the last quarter ending Sept. :i0, 1883, there were landed at Portland OS immigrants, of whom 0:1 were males and 10 females. All of wbotn were Nova Scotians. As to their occupations, there were 4 clerks, 12 farmers 0 fishermen, mariner 1, merchants 2, no occupation 27, salesman 1, and tinsmith. Hi. The Oil and Gnano factory of B. Frank Gallup, East Boothbay, has closed for the season, the fish taking their departure South. Mr. Gallup has had a" prosperous season, and feels amply rewarded for Ills long and patient waiting for the advent of tho porgies. ^Last week lie made his final shipment of 300 barrels of oil to Boston, and 200 tons of dry gnano to the Cumberland Bone Co. The Temperance  Question Again. Advance. How is it with the saloon-keepers? Their establishments are the yawning pits into which is ponred the great bulk of the earnings of the lubor of the city; they are the nurseries and schools of crime; to them are due tho drunkenness of men, the wreck of families,, the impoverishment of the multitude. Iu their places the victims are poisoned and robbed of their strength, their health, their intelligence; their business encourages the wife-beaters and the thieves, burglars and ruffians. By it boys are educated to be drunkards and brought up in idleness, \ ice and bestiality. By them idleness and vice are taught to take the place of industry and sobriety. Everything that is criminal, debasing and villainous finds its natural birthplace in tho saloon; and nothing produces or promotes thesu that is not destructive of decency, industiy, thrift and good morals. The above is taken from the Chicago T/-i!)tmc, a paper which last year, before the election, had so much to say against prohibitionists that it might have been j called tho organ of the liquor dealers. There is no longer any doubt that the country is becoming thoroughly alarmed at the spread of intemperance and eon^ sequent increase of crime. l Take Chicago alone. Ten days ago a man on the West Side came home drunk and whippcd"1iis. wife to death in '.he sight of hei child. The saloon did it. The next day a drunken riiau murdered another in a saloon in the same neighborhood. Liquor did it.- Last week two noted desperadoes met in a saloon and fought to the death of one and the wounding of tile other,, with' revolvers. Whisky did it. More than three-fourths of nil crime is traceable directly to the saloons. This nation pays the - liquor-dealers over seven hundred millions of dollars each year, and ill return has all the expense of prosecuting and punishing the victims of these men, and then spends as muoh more guarding society against the evils they create. And this is not :< tithe of the cost. If all the tears and groans and sighs and grief; if all the ruin and misery and blighted hopes and wrecked lives which the liquor dealers cause could bo seen nt once, the sight would raise up an army of opposition. There is only one privileged class in this country-the liquor dealers. ***** One of the surest paths for the feet of a good man is to find out. what these outlaws and murderers want the Legislatures to do and then do the opposite thing with all his might. There are sevetal things which wc must constantly do. The pulpits must thunder against the evil, and the press give no uncertain sound. We must help those women who are banded together in Christ's name in the Women's Christian Union. Wo must educate the children and youth to know the nature and efl'ect of alcohol, and to hate the traffic in the poison as they hate uothing else. Tho church of Jesus Chri-t must fling itself into tho struggle, and in the primaries and at the polls, help to answer its own-prayers for deliverance from this curse. There should at once be formed in every community a citizens' league for the enforcement of existing temperance laws. We must lij.'ht or surrender. wuittkx ion TiiF. hatii ixuki-hxokxt by .w. O. if i.i.Kit, Jit. F.lizabeth Stuart Phelps's new story is entitled "A Brave Girl." Probably wore her winter hat two seasons. A health journal pnblishes rules on "How to Avoid Getting Fat." Newspaper compositors don't rare to learn them. And after all. brethren, the tramp is the only consistent  member  ol  society, always takes things as he linds them. ' He j Balloons were first ascended in 100 years" I ago this month. A great many things bc-j sides balloons have gone up since that time. i A Hartford �-.tan has a talking crow. A j crow is bad enough at his tiest estate, but a I crow that talks must border on the infernal. j   I)e I.esseps (pronounce it yourself) is lect-J tiring.   We have noticed that when a man j fails_in_djgghig a canal he always .' ieVturimr______. " ..'.".. goes to Tfie owner oPTTTy-Eye-See wants 100,000 for that rapid horse. Man wants but little here below, but in this instance he'll probably want that little long. Onr neighbors of the Provinces are much scared by dynamite, and every time a citizen hears a boy yell at a companion ten feet away he jumps clear over a fence. Martin Farcpihar Tapper is said to be poor. We are not only sorry but surprised to hear it. We had always s.ipposed that it was only hjs poetry that was poor. A course ol lectures on the arachnarchctype, the cntomarchetype, the onithmarchetypc and so lor,ih, opens iu Boston this week. Persons arc requested to purchase their tickets in advance and avoid the rush at the door. Speaking of the enforcement of the prohibitory law an exchange says: "You can't get ahead of whiskey." No, we can't, 'cause we don't use it, but those who do, most always get a head of it. That is, if wc read the predictions aright. "Father," mournfully said the young man who had stepped behind the sorrel colt in the dark and caught her oll'-^'oot in his face, "father, do I look very bad ?" "Bad :" snorted the old man, "Bad ? Why you look as bad as a newspaper cut of a popular candidate." The young man groaned. A writer notes the wonderful rapidity with which time seems to pass in dreams, the events of years occurring in a few moments of sleep. Yes, we know. But if the writer had ever given a four-months note at the bank, and there was doubt in his mind as to his ability ^o meet it at maturity, he never would have needed a dream to illustrate the breathless precipitation of time. ----  ------- .__ Demand for peanuts doubled in past five years. Average consumption last year about three pints for each man, woman and child in the country. As a i;reat many people look upon tho peanut as low and embonpoint, it follows that many lovers ot that fruit must have devoured far more than the above individual average. Anybody who went to a circus last summer can readily believe this. The weather is just getting cold enough to break up tho man who has been making a living by peddling icecream out of a wagon for the past three months, and to bring out the lank dyspeptic man who wears long hair, a high hat and a shawl.-Puck. .,�s- TilK 1UCYCI.K AMI 1111: XOIIILITV. Karl. Granville rides the bicycle. This is all right, of course-anybody is at liberty to ride- a bicycle if he wants to and can stick on, but it is a blow at our sacred impressions of the English nobility to think of one of the tirst blood drifting up the street on a pair of wheels and staring vacantly ahead at the horizon. We think of an English peer as a personage of noble presence, with a head ' haughtily carried i;i the air, and not as a party in a little short-waisted flannel jacket and abbreviated trousers with three buttons at the knee, and a pair of legs that ought to lie ruled off the course. We haven't any respect for an earl that will go spinning across the country scaring horses and old women. A noble lord would look all risht to us with a coronet of some sort on his brow, but wo can't get used to him hi a little visorlcss cap with three gilt letters on the front, especially if he has a big nose. There is something about the combination of a big nose and a little cap that makes our eyes ache. We have read a great deal about earls and things in our earlier (unpremeditated pun) days, and we always had an ndmiratbn for them. When the proud aud noble Earl de Morenci began speaking in the pages of a novel we always took off our hat and listened in nu attitude of the utmost deference and respect. An earl in liis pretty clothes and stage swagger had attractions for our youthful fancy that the sweep of years never has succeeded in eradicating. But we confess that Earl Granville and his bicycle have aimed a stroke at the citidel of our youthful belief that makes it totter. Where at one time the rich and powerful Earl of Warwick or Lamp-wick or something would have haughtily bade the Ytii'lcis bring forth his royally caparisoned palfrey, and the menials would have dashed with alacrity to obey the order, Earl Granville now says to his servant: "'Encry, 'Enery, my boy, stand bout my 'cycle," and Henry docs it with a feeling of contempt. It's too bad. We don't wonder that the English are getting tired of the titled classes, when the first noblemen of the realm persist iu riding a fly wheel that in time is bound to split them to the chin. An English peer is long-legged enough, history knows, without splitting himself into a pair of eoinpasses by purely nicchanical methods. 77?1   

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