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Independent Junior: Saturday, October 20, 1883 - Page 1

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - October 20, 1883, Bath, Maine                                VOL. IV. SATURDAY, OCTOBER J20, NO. 40 MM    +f Special Correspondence of the Portland Press. BATH. INDEPENDENT   ITEMS. A Busy Yeur iu the Ship Yards-What the Builders Have Done and Are Ddfcig-List of Vessels Launched- Cheerful Outlook on the Kennebec. WUTITKN l'OU TUK HATH INDKl'KNPV.XT UT W. O. l-'UM.KK,  .lit. livery monarchy is like a chew of Sooner or Inter it is bound to crumble. D. O. FOYE & CO., Wholesale and Kctull Dealers hi" STAPLE AND FANCY gum l Gobs & Sawyer and Goss, Sawyer and Packard have launched eleven eralt this year namely: NAME,       I)I�3CllirTION.      TONNAGE. Jcntilo,    Four mtiatcd atcam frultur for West Indian trade, Ijonndor Belle,     Schooner, JU. P. Ropofl,        Schooner, Jpbbc 8. Prctmnn, Stcnm fruiter, Wont * I ml i tin trnde, Wm. II. Smith,    Ship, CUns. II.- Wolsun, Schooner, IU. K. Sawyer,      fch'tp, Thrasher, S.cam Whaler, John 8- Davit,     Schooner, City of Jackson- vllle, Schooner, Amy, Hark, 3/05.00 74H.O0 U30.00 510.00 2,003.10 300.00 3,993.00 512.00 363.C0 054,00 700,00 About the 15th of November they will launch the ship B.F. Packard, tM00 tons, Captain Water-house, of Portland, master, and are now building a 1,100 ton steamer for San Francisco parties; a small schoon  er of 300 tons burden, and a oo0 ton schooner for Emerson Hopes. IN WM. ItOOKUH YARD. ..... Will i'am Roger* launchedon Saturday a magnificent ship, the Kennebec., of !M2(S.-ftl tons burden, SOfdcet dock. 4�U'cct beam and U7 feet hold. She will be commanded byCapt.Ford of! Searsport, Maine.,,." "This""^li|^is~drTinc'-ino"deI and strong and. thorough construction ; she is the largest of the fine ships for the building of which Mr. Rogers is justly noted. This yard has launched since January first the following vessels. Name. George Ii. Brake, Gov. Rohio, Kinmn 1'. Angel, Mnry U. Allen, Douglas Hovcy, Description. Schooner, Ship, Schooner, Tonnage. 465.03 1,71:2.78 862-20 320.25 4'J2.00 IX t. m. iiaiuk's vakd. Another launching occurred on Thursday at-the yard of T. M. Hagan, the *vLida Fowler," an A. t. iruit schooner of 195,27 tons burden, owned by S. A, "Wharf, and commanded by Captain I. B. Atkins of Trovincctown. This schooner is built with an eye to speed, a quality necessary in the West India trade. From this yard have been launched in 1885 a whole fleet of fishing and fruit schooners. Name. Cora May, Wra. H. Cross, Edith Mclntyre, Joeie May, George D. Payne, Way M. Dyer, liizzlo flayat), lliud Helen, Ui'o. II. lloldcn, DcflCffptton. Fruiting Schooner, Fishing II <( 14 %i 41 Pilot ti it it tt t  Description. Schooner, - - - -�i-------------- Fiuhing Schooner, 4( tt (I tt (I tl II Tonnitgc. 550 704 100 00 100 do 00 50 508.00 This firm has upon the ways a pilot boat to be launched soon, and have contracted to build two schooners of 200 tons each for Massachusetts parties. IX arthur SI5WAJ.laxd Co\s YAUO. Arthur Sewell & Co. have launched this year the schooner "Blanch Allen," 020 tons burden, and the ship Kaincr," Captain Samuel 11. Morrison, of 1087 tons burden. They have upon the stocks a 2,-00 ton ship, and a frame for a 2,'UOO tonncr in the yard. The ship on the stocks is pronounced of superior model for both speed and capacity;- IN DKKlUXt; AN1> ,pONNKI.]."8 YAltD. The firm of Dccnr.g & Doimcll built in Name. Win. T. Donnell, J. H. Smith, Mmui a., I* m mnr tiollulrc, OIihh. A. D)er, Kthcl, i?mw� ct, Scow, They have reclassed the schooners (icorgie Shepard and William Shcpard, both built bv them in 187.'�, are now con-btmeting a 000 ton schooner, and have in yard frame for another of the same mould. suu'mm.mxi; xotks' C 1>. Harrington constructed this .'year tl.e steamer Islander and Perry V., tug Phillips Katon, and are no^v building a two masted schooner^. > Houghton Bros.i'.drc building a ship.   ' S Palmer & Haley will launch in about A month a fair sized schooner. K. Soule & Co. launched in August the schooner II. C. Higginson, olO tons burden, and are building a 700 tonner, to be launched in November. , .The year 1888 lias been a busy one for ship builders. Wages have ,!>cen good, and the favorable weather,, has made the work progress rapidly. Bath has^put on the water this year &1 craft with an aggregate tonnage of '23,B6'1. Morse Bros, are having a 100 ton tug built for their line. It is expected that improvements in machinery will, make her both powerful and fast. If you want a good name for your dog call him q. Then he never will go away from u. * 'la it healthy to He on one side constantly asks a correspondent. Not if you are a lawyer. A young reader of this paper, wlio.se father caught him smoking the first cigar, writes to enquire if we can tell him what will remove tan. /'How shall we utilize the Indians r 'anxiously queries a magazine writer. How would it do to load them into guns and "shoot" the Niagara whirlpool with them : * A medical expert gives it as his opinion that a person who travels by rail should "take all sorts of positions."  Editing a political party organ will admirably fit n#man for this. People throughout the State arc beginning to talk prohibition. They can talk it a year, and then voter then there'll be lots j sorry that they didn't vote the other way. "Arc vour bees all nicclv lixed for winter ?" queries thclicwiston Journal.  Well, wc can only speak for the bee that stung us last summer.  We fixed that one.  Winter can't trouble him. * The Princess of Wales is growing deaf. This is too bad. Wc arc always sorry for anybody who is deaf. But then, she won't be able to hear so many bad things said about the Prince. An author in a story lying before us describes the heroine as speaking in a strained voice.1 If a strained voice is anything like strained pumpkin it must be very tine. But then you can't use a strained voice in a pie. * "A rural gentleman who was boasting to a group of admiring friends that he often furnished articles for the county paper, neglected to explain that the articles were cord-wood and squashes, and that he furnished/hem in payment of his subscription. \ "What will they do when I am dead r" plaintively sings Henry P. Lockwood in a recent poem.' They'll probably bury you, Henry, unless you insist on cremation. But you'll have to do that in advance of your demise. They'll never listen to "you afterwards. It is noticeable in a newspaper ofllec that the man who signs bis contributions "Constant Reader," never sends his true name. Which proves that he isn't a constant reader, else he would sec what the paper so often says upon that indispensable point. � * "For a stimulus in fjhis good work," exclaimed the temperance lecturer, "let us take-"� �3-Al8ofull Stock Fresh Meats dally ro JAMES B. DRAKE, MISS LOACH Wo'jhl tnlorm th,*� Luetic* llmt she htift ft New and Well Selected Stock of WINTER MILLINERY 1 All the New Designs for Stamping. SCHOOL SUPPLIES! OF THE WRITING OF BOOKS. OHIO'S ELECTION. W. SHOREY, -DKALKlt IN- Pressed Hay and Ice. GRANITE BLOCK, OPPOSITE CITY HALL, Has everything required for use in the Bchootn, Composition ISonkH 5 eta. Note Paper 3 ctR. a quire and upwards. Fools' Cup PiiporGctcu Primary School Writing Kookg, &c Schools IhigPi Lunch Boxch, Lunch IJiwkctH, School Companions, uml a Uuuurnl Afwortmutil of IFANCY GOODS. BATH, matne. CALL AND SEE CO TO H. L. CHASE'S FALL SUITINGS tfor a GOOD;:.T.itADK hi FRESH MEATS, \ND.... GROCERIES, And you will go again. ....AND.. fr   t DBRC01T1IGS 4 Now Opening  m :vt. #   r^Ship Stores a Specialty. TRY HIM. ORDER YOUR PROVISIONS AT Russell's Market, Where may be found nt nil times n Fine Assortment of Meats, Vegetables, Country Produce, + And everything  usually found in a Flret-C'lass Market. WALTER S. RUSSELL, 146 FRONT ST. The Novelist Howells on the Work of Novelists. Tho following is from an interview in the Boston Herald: '*Your new novel, I suppose, Mr. Howells?'1 wi\s uskml, nfter nn apology for the untimely interruption. **Yei, it is the opening of it," wns the reply, pointing to the MS/ "It will deal with American characters, but it is somewhat premature to say anything about it at present. You see I havo only reached the sixty-seventh psge." The reporter glanced at the hhlf-written "takcM of copy. The chiro-graphy wns of n moderately line, free running variety, with plenty of space between the lines. **My wotting hours," continued Mr. Howells, in response to inquiries, "are from 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. I dine at 2 1\ M., and am a man of leisure for the rest of the day. On an average I cover about twelve of those half sheets in tho course of a morning; there are times when I do more work, as in supplying the concluding chapters of 'Modern Instance,' I turned out some twenty-live pages per day, but ..that is exceptional. One ' of tho pa^os, "1 should say, might make a stick (twenty lines) of Herald nonpareil. You see I write very deliberately indeed; yet I do a great deal of revising, changing words, making elisions, inserjticns: ;�:tc. i Sometimes I rewrite a whole chfjpler, and I have on occasions condensed a chapter into a paragraph. The manuscript of 'A Foregone Conclusion1 was entirely re-written, and in some respects I think its workmanship is better than that of my other books.v Delinquent Tax Payers for 1883 Take Notice! Causes of the Republican Defeat. A. K. McClnre of the Philadelphia Times writes as follows from Cincinnati: This is the first time the Democrats havo ever carried Ohio tj^ico' in con-i secutivo contests since tho itftopublicnns won their fust victory with Chase twenty-eight years ago, and it is the first time that they have won in.Ohio with a full vote polled. They carried Ohio in 1802, in the general Republican demoralization over the emancipation proclamation, but Vallandigham was beaten for Governor 100,000 tho next year. . They elected Allen Governer in 187:3, by a scratch on a very light vote, but lost all their other State candidates. In 1871 Ohio was engulfed in the anti-Grant tide along with Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and many other Republican States. But 187.") brought her back to her old Republican moorings by the election of Hayes as Governer. In 1877, another light vote and general Republican demoralization gave the Democrats the state by default. In 1878 tho Republicans regained the state and held it until.the last year, when it-was again carried by the Democrats, presumably by -the-liquor issue, but largely by slay-at home Republicans. Tuesday both parties dignified the qout'est into-naHonaHnrportnnxjc~a"S'~one~ of the most vital preliminary battles of 1882. The Republican machinery and means were extensively employed to save the- State for the Presidential race, and what have heretofore been accidents of Democratic victory in Ohio now commanded the respect due a really victorious party with an apparent lease of "lieer!" yelled an evil individual on back scut. The applause broke tip the meeting. the �:J; L. FA REAR 9 large BATH SHIPS AT PKISCO. Six months ago sixty shillings a ton ..as being offered at San Froneisco for ships to load for Europe. They are now taking thirty-three. The. freight market opened in August at 47 shillings G pence, at which quite a number of Bath ships were taken, among the number being the Standard, Win. Babcock, Thomas M, llccd, Armenia, Berlin, Chas. E. Moody. The next week freights for slups dropped to 45, which was accepted by the Fuunie Tucker, Bohemia, Austria, Undaunted and others. They then settled down to 40 shillings at which rate were chartered the 1*. M. Whitmorc and Arabia. The next ahip taking was the Iromioi's at 3-1 shillings G pence, and then freights took a tumble to So, which was accepted by the K-lizabeth of Damariscotta. Minott launched his handsome new ship the "St, Charles" at l'hipsburg Center Thursday noon. The ship registers about 1600 tona net. The launch was witnessed by many visitors who went from this city. Queen Victoria has telephone lines running in all directions from the castle. Wonder how she feels when she orders two pounds and a half of mutton chop from the butcher, and he brings up a peck of turnips and declares that is what she onlcredr Must seem funny, to order up a queen by telephone. * A Ilockhiud mother overheard her youthful son boasting to a companion that his father had a million dollars in the hank, and other wealth of a fabulous character. "You Bartholomew,"   she cried   from the window, "what do you mean by such conversations ?  Do you want to grow up and per-1 Imps get to be a writer of circus bilU r  Come in here til! I tend to you!" * 'Mother," expostulated a lvoeklojjd youth as his maternal relative was poking him up- r stairs lo bed, "why can't you let me alone? Here this morning you yelled ami jawed and hollered till I got out of bed, and now you don't rest till you get mo buck into it. AVhat makes a woman so unreasonable?" His mother waited till he got so the slipper would tit close, and then she let him have it. *_________________ Queen Victoria is at present greatly perplexed, because she lifts a garter to give away and doesn't know aipon wjiom-to bestow it. Well, rather than for'thc quccjt to be unnecessarily troubled, she may send it to us-^though whatever wc can do with ono^gartcr.wc don't see, and wc wear such short waisted stockings r anyway that they can't come down. But we hope wcarc too high-minded to sec a queen in trouble and not offer to help her out.  Send us the garter, Mrs.-Mrs.- What is her other name ? * WHAT HHUEDITY IS. "What is heredity?" asktd Mrs. Wiggles-worth, glancing up from the inside of her paper. "Heredity ?" repeated Mr. Wigglcswovth, who was industriously laving an old coat-collar with some villainous smelling compound; "heredity is a kind of a thing that-well, take our boy for instance; he's red-headed and his tce^b aro bad and nothing that he snys can bo depended on. He takes those- traits from you. Well,'that's horcdity. See?" Mrs. Wigglcsworth saw. And later in the e vening _when Mr. Wigglcsworth got into bed, he sat down on'his wife's well-filled needle-cushion, which by some mysterious fatality had got into bed before- him.. **From whom do."y,pu take ypur agility ?" XL  J mildly enquired his wife, as Mr. Wigglcsworth bounded onto the floor with a yell. "Is heredity-" Would respectfully call llio attention of tho people of Bath U> his largo ami varied Block of llrst class STOVES & RANGES Wliirh will bo boUI cheap as tho choapt'st, uml w:ir-rnntct! as rfproHeiiletl ia every cuau, I havo iu my HLorei* a full lino of the Celebrated CITY* OF BATH, Ofilec of the Collector of Taxes, Out. (i,,1883. The State, County and City TnxcH for the year 1883, committed to the undersigned for collection, are now due and carry Interest at the rate of 7 per cent, per Annum nfter thlo date. Every male Inhabitant, whether Citizen or Alien, above the aire of twenty-one yearn, who was resident in mild Hath on the first day of April, IK8:t, is liable for the payment of a I'oll Tax of Thhek Dom.akh, ($3,on,) without further notice, and payment thereof will be strictly enforced. Any other or further notice or demand will be at the cost of the tax-payer. All Taxes remaining unpaid October 20, 1883, willbe collected by process of law, and at an increased expense to the parties owing tho same. J. M. HIOTT, Collector of Taxes. Collector's Oillce Hours .-9 a. m. to 12 m,; 2 to 4 p. m.  Saturday evenings only, 7 to 8 p. m. NEW CROP! GARDEN TEAS OF 1883 PICKINGS. Just received a largo lot of the ilnest Garden Tens imported. ti � 4 it Ilreakfa.ct, Very Fine Garden Formosa", Japan. Breakfast, Superior Formosa's, Superior .Japan's, Choice Oolong and Japan, Our Teas at KOc urc equal to these Bold most places at from 10 to 2oe\ per lh. more. 5c. per lb. allowance on purchases] of 5 lbs., and special prices , the chest. 7j>c II) (iOc lb liOe lb Gl)c lb �10 Sc itOe lb 40 iSr.fiOc lh ;;oc lb at by "Chm you tell mo whether it is ens-j power limited to good behavior. Ac-tomary or not for tl.e writers of maga-j cording to modern Democratic precedents, tliat may not be regarded as a promise of long continued Democratic rule in Ohio, but if the Republican leaders suppose that Ohio is n certain or even probable Republican State for 188-1: they crayejy,jni9undcrstand the situation. It looks like the breaking up of a long Republican winter in the Buckeye State and only Democratic blunders or crimes can restore the lost Republican power. The two causes which most contributed to defctt the Republicans were: First* the prohibitionists voting for their own ' State ticket, and, second, the wool-growing counties resenting the reduced tariff on wool.    Strange as it may appear, thousands of Republican wool-growers voted squarely for the Democrats because Senator Sherman and the Republican Congressman from Ohio voted for tho reduced protection in wool, while Senator Pendleton and tho Democratic Congressmen voted against the new tariff and the Democratic gains in the wool-growing regions startled both parties. In every wool-growing county the Democrats gained on their vote of last year.and in some districts very largoly. The Prohibitionists are mainly Republicans and their voting for a third ticket was an act of superlative folly viewed from  any common sense standpoint; but political . Prohibitionists are not amenable to common sense laws in politics.   They believe that the tail is the dog, and if the Prohibition tail can't wag the politica 1 dog they care little who or what wins by them throwing their votes away.   It was not the liquor vote of Ohio that elected the proclaimed candidate of the liquor interest;   it   was   the Prohibitionists, who stultified themselves by giving the liquor^ nuxn> a most Uu^pQsi&nt victory and tho wool-growers who deserted the party of protection in Ohio and voted for a party that is largely free trade, to resent the encroachment of free trade upon the wool interest. COFFJEES! New Hub Ranges Very llest Pare Mocha, Veryllest Mocha and O. O. Java, Very licst old Uov't Java, Very llest Drown Java, Very Uest Fancy Uio, Very Choice Kio, Adiscount on the above prices by lar*a worth. r>c li) li'Jc lb 30e lb 24c li) 18c lb 14c lb the dol- Whieh stands unrivalled a* the BEST OF THE TIIYIKS. Call and examine ito wonderful Keflex Grate nnd OycilluUng Oven Shelf and Large Oven. 1 shall alno, for the Fall Trade, have a Inrgo and varied Htoek of KLKGANT l'AU-LOR STOVES nnd will endeavor to Btiit all in Price and (Quality. Jobbing and House Work Promptly attended to by competent workmen. Center Street, near City Hall. FLOUR r Marked Down 2oc. to 50c. per Barrel. FOYE & CO., Front St,, Opp. Columbian. Hall, zino serials to have their stories finished    before   the    publication   is begun 3,1 **It is, assuredly, always very desirable to have a story pretty well completed before any of it goes into the printer's hands. There are likely lobe many passages one wishes to retouch and improve, and often some considerable alterations to be made at the last moment, in order to preserve the harmony and symmetry of the work. For my own part, I am generally at least six numbers in advance of publication, and alwnys have my story well under control before i allow any part of it to go to tho publishers/' "What is the cu3totn with tho English novelists?11 41 am inclined to think that, as a general thing, they keep fewer manuscript chapters between the pen and tho j press than U the case with us, and this fact probably accounts for the uneven character of many English novels that have th'st appeared Serially. I was speaking about the matter with an English novelist whom I met in London, lie agreed with me as to the bid effects of hurried work to catch editions. He, moreover, said that it was always his intention to have his story completed in advance, but that, as a matter of fact, he never did so. lie would take a contract to furnish a story at a given time, but it frequently happened that tho publisher would make early announcements, and then come to him with an urgent request for the opening chapters for a certain number, and the instalments once begun, there was no withdrawjng,.'' "I should think, Mr. Howells/1 said the reporter, "that, after the completion of a long novel, yon would find it very necessary to take much more time for rest and recreation than you are wont to grunt yourself." "Well, I have always been a bulievcr in the gospel of work for myself, as well us for other people.   I fail to see that ! long'temis of intellectual inactivity arc beneficial.   It seems to mo that they arc: injurious instead.   There is  always a| reluctance   about   turning    to' . work, again, and the day appointed for the resumption of the poned with more After a lonjr vacation a writer feels very much like the man who said that he never wanted a holiduv so much as the day after he had had one. I prefer properly to apportion my work and recreation, and take them together as far as practicable.11 US WARD'S PROGRAM. HE FAINTED. The and and TT FALL GOODS AND.... AND WOOD YARD! Overcoats But Mr. Wigglcsworth told her not to he a cushion through the open Made to Order, Stylishly, Reasonably, and Durably, The undersigned has opened, in connection with the HOWDOINUAM STEAM SAW MIIJL, a Lumber and.Wood Yard, where may be found Spruce   Dimensions, OF ALL KINDS, SHINGLES, LATHS, SLABS, ETC. SPRUCE FLOORING AND SHEATHING, CONSTANTLY ON HAND. We have before us a relic of "Artemus Ward.   It is one of the programs of his . , "Among the Mormons" enteitainment pen is apt to be pose-; (1;lt)1(l  8;imUlskyi  Miiy sth, (probably freedom than pro tit. \ m, }   We copy a few specimens: -The music on the grand piano will comprise 'Dear mother, I have come home to die by request,1'etc., "Washoe, tho land of silver--Good quarters to be found there. Playful population, fond of high-low-jack and homicide.11 "Ileber C. Rim-ball's Harciu-Mr. Kimball is a kind husband and numerous father.1' "Selections from the grand piano-Mr. Forrester- Mr. Forrester once hoarded in the same street with Gottschalk. Tho, man who kept; tho boarding-house remembers it. "Those of the audience who do not feel oilended with Artemus Ward are cordially invited to call upon him often, at his fine new house in Chicago. His house is on the right hand side as you cross the ferry, and may bo easily distinguished from the other houses by having a cupolo and mortgage on it. "Answers to correspondents: Laura Matilday-*I have an unfortunate tendency, even on trival occasions, lo shed tears. How can I prevent it?11 'Lock up the shed.1 " "Traveller-'How long was Artemus Ward in California?1 'Five feet ten and a half.111 "Citizen-'1 ara getting bald. What will make my hair come out?1 *Oil of vitriol will make all your hair come out. "Rules of the hou=e: Ladies or gentlemen will please report any neglienco or disobedience on tho part of the lecturer. Artemus Ward will not be responsible for money, jewelry or valuables unless left with him-to be returned in a AT fool, and fired the window. SNOW'S. BT Frames Sawed to Order a: Satisfaction Guaranteed. d It was on a WcsternTailroarl. conductor had been   his   rounds, taken a seat beside a very quiet unassuming passenger. "Pretty full train," finally observed the passenger. "Yes." "Road seems to be   doing a good \ business.11 . "Oh, tho road makes plenty of money, but-" "But what?" asked the passenger, as tho other hesitated. "Bad management.   It is the worst managed lino in this whole country.11 "Is that so?11 "That's so.- The board of oflicials might know how to run a side show to a circu?, but they can1t tackle a railroad." "Who is the biggest fool in tho lot?1' "Well the superintendent is.*' "I'm glad of that,1' said the passenger, as his face lighted  np,   "I was afraid you would say it was the president.11 "Suppose I lind?* "Why, I'm the man.11 -4 1 It SLABS, EDGING and SHORT WOOD, by Cord or Cargo- GALL AND GET PRICES. JOHN SNOW. A letter received in Boston from Henry M. Stanley, the African explorer, states that he arrived on the Congo last December, has been up as far as the Equator, and has established two more stations, besides discovering another lake. week or so. Persons who think they will enjoy themselves more by leaving the halt early in the evening arc requested to do so with as little noise as possible.1' Joaquin Miller, has brought a lot at the hsad of Sixteenth street, Washington, on the hill, and will erect in the shade of some mighty oaks a genuine log cabin, with all "modern improvements.11 < i r ft   

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