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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1883 - Page 1

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Location: Bath, Maine

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - October 13, 1883, Bath, Maine                                SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1888. NO. 45. Who was Taken la By a Cuto West Bath Lassie. A Winneganco Youth Who was Willing to Shed Hts  Heart's Blood  for His Loved One But Who Fainted at the Dummy. Sight of a One fine Jay within tlic last month a Winneganco youth who is, .or was, very much in !ovo with a young lady over at Wcat Bath, walked to the young lady's home to make a call and attend her to and lrom a meeting to bo held that evening in Winncgance. The young man had fro-, qucntly boasted to his inamorata that he was very brave, and so the young lady, who had some doubts on the subject, determined to find out if his words were true. She arranged a schemo which her two brothel's proccoded to carry into execution. Between the Mill Cove road and Winncgance is a bridle-path which makes a short cut and beautiful walk, between the two suburbs of our town. About onc-sixtccnth ot a mile lrom the lady's house in this path the boys arranged the dummy ot a man, to _ the arms, of which they.fastenedropes, .the. ~ other cuiij of which were thrown over the branches of opposite trees, and behind theses trees the mischievous youngsters bid. - -The lovers started from the farm alter. tea to walk to Winncgance, and the lady  purposely began to talk ot tramps and her tear of meeting some. Edward (we will call him Edward and the lady Ellen) reassured her, stating that he would be willing to shed his heart's blood in her defence if need be, and further stating that he could whip any dozen tramps that tramped ! So ! the fair Ellen consented at last to a moonlight stroll through the wood road. Of course thev had not proceeded far when in the dim light the dummy was seen facing them and standing in the middle ot the path. The lady shrieked "A tramp!" Theroupon the two boys pulled on the lines and up went the dummy high among the branches of the trees. Edward-alas! that we should have the sad duty of chronicling what followed-fainted, and fell a helpless lump of departed valor at the feet of his fair one. .She waited, and the boys likewise, for him to recover. Upon regaining his senses he gazed wildly about him for a second and then shouting "It's a ghost! My God. Ellen, 'tis a ghost!" jumped up and began making the best time on record in the direction of Winncgance ! The lady called to her departing lover to stop, but stop he did not, simply shouting for her to follow, which Ellen was in no mood to do. The next evening he called to patch up affairs, but there was nary a patch possible. West Bath girls don't hanker after such gallants for husbands. INDEPENDENT ITEMS. WMTTRX rOlt THE RATH IN'DKl'KXDKNT 11Y W. 0. I'L'LLKU, J15. Talk about a mere song, ono of them. Putti gets &S50 for TOO PREVIOUS! A Brunswick Boy Falls In Love with a Wlunegauce Ulrl at First Sight. And Proposes Matrimony. But the Fates In the Shape of an Irate Father with a Press board Prevents the Pressure of His Suit, Last Sunday night, we are informed on reliable authority, a little domestic tragedy in the shape of an unsuccessful love affair occurred in Winncgance. It seems that a young man, from BrUmv wick had driven to Winneganco to cnll upon some lady friends. At the house of his friends there chanced to be a beautiful young lady whom, at the close of her stay, he escorted to her home, and whoso polite invitation to come in he accepted with great pleasure. The lady's charms proved too much for the susceptible youth (whohnd met hor for the first time this evening) and he made her very seriously a proposal of marriage, and with bis declaration of love proceeded to clasp the fair maiden in his arms. Her alarming shrieks rather discomfited the suitor, and his discomfiture was emphasized when into the parlor came the young lady's papa picturesquely attired in his night clothes, the tails of his shirt flopping gracefully behind him, armed with a press-board, and breathing vengeance from his nostrils. The young man ceased pressing his suit, and the old man began pressing him. By the watch it was four and one-half seconds from the time the fa the/1 entered, to the moment when the Brunswick laddie struck the street. It is perhaps well to add that the Brunswicker's matrimonial ardor has fallen to 14 degress below zero. At lenBt so far as Winnegunee belles are concerned. GOOD ADVICE. A Bath foiy year-old was taken in to sec his new baby sister. "Where did you get her, Mamma?'' he inquired gravely. "Oh, an angul brought her, dear," the mother replied. "Where-from Heaven?" the young man asked. "Yes, dear, I suppose so." "Well, if they haven't got any better looking ones 'n her I'd tell that angel not to bring any more," the youth advised. ENTRAPPED. Chas. Snow, a West Bath farmer, has lately been annoyed by skunks getting into the cornfield, so one night the first of tho week he set a trap in which next morning lie found four of the inodorous varmints nnd a woodchuck. Highly elated Sno.w set his trap the following night and Thursday morning on going to his field saw a big fox hobbling across the ground dragging after him the trap. Snow obtained assistance and succeeded in capturing Reynard alive. Winneganco people complain of dangerous condition of the side walks. the Justice travels slow but it strikes with iron hand. The citizens of Bcllo Plains, Iowa, last week rotten-egged their brass band. � The new comet, It is said, is near Eta Draco-nis. Look out for him, Eta-he's a bad man. He's been implicated in tho star routes for years. # Don't despair of holping somebody because you arc small.  Porhaps you arc like a liomco pathetic pill. You may !>c little but you can, do lots of good. * "It is something I can't understand," sal:l Mrs. Wlgglcsworth, laying down the paper, "why every Frenchman's first nnme begins with an M. Here's M. Ferry and M. Wilson and M. Grevy nnd a dozen more. Must bother the postmaster terribly." Martin F.Titnpcr gives as an excuse for writing his "proverbial philosophy" that ho desired to thus express himself to a girl whom he loved. She read the essays and-married him Martin was then 18. But tho girl-well, she must have been much younger-oh, years and years younger. * An eastern map-peddler, who read the state mcnt that ten California ostriches had kicked their mates to death, took the first train west. He said he wanted to sec for himself if there was anything that could errual the intensity of a new England boot under the direction of a determined granger. � At a local concert the manngcr craved the indulgence of tho audience toward the young lady ivho appeared as a whistling soloist, as her trunk had been unavoidably detained. Inasmuch as tho young lady was not an elephant and so didn't whistle through her trunk, the audience readily overlooked the discrepancy. Marshal P. Wilder at a dinner given to him in Boston the other day said: "When I came to this city there was not a mile of railroad on this continent, now there arc 120,000." The thanks of a grateful country should bo tendered Mr. Wilder-though wo do not exactly understand how his coming to Boston could create such a boom in railroads.  It is finally decided that the grave of Shake-spear is not to be opened in order to see what kind of a looking mail William was. We have all along been of the opinion that the idea was erroneous. The pictures we now have of the immortal poet represent him.as a good looking party with a vast and mountainous forehead. It is the kind of countenance wc love ta think of in connection with such a man. No good then could come of exhuming bis skull and comparing it with these portraits. Anybody knows in advance that thcre'd he a discrepancy. In point of beauty there is a look of dull and unimpassioncd vacancy about the handsomest skull that renders it open to criticism. * Water lias a curious effect upon canvas that has never, wc think, been alluded to by scientists. The experiment can be performed in any household and is calculated to all'ord much amusement. The ingredients arc a new canvas bvig and an old yellow cat. Poko the cat into the bag together with six bricks. Sew up the end carefully with the strongest twue, and then throw the "whole business" into a pond half a mile from tho house. The singular action of the water upon the canvas is shown by the fact that when you get back home that yellow cat will be sitting on the front stoop, with an injured look on his countenance, engaged in picking the water out of his car with his longest claw. OXTR SUCCESS ! Isaacson's Boston Branch CLOTHING HOUSE! Front St., opposite Ferry St., Bath, Me. THE WHOLE STORY IN A NUTSHELL! WE ARE? HAVE-BEEN; AND SHALL BE Because our EXPENSES ARE LOWER !-Yes, away below-those of any other House in Bath! Because our direct connection with the Jobbing Trade in Boston, and ou Hcavr Interests in the Great Market-place of New England give us BUYING ADVANTAGES c any other House in Bath! And right here and now We take a po.ition that wo I ave always over in- Wc have, beyond the Question of a Doubt, Practically, the Largest Stock of CLOTHING IN BATH! Wc have positively no Old Goods whatever, and Our Store is Literally Crammed from Floor to Ceiling With Desirable Clothin for Fall and Winter. Everything is New, Stylish and Fresh, and as for the PRICE- �we never have and we intend to Never Allow Any One to Undersell Us. SIGXS. For the ponds and streams to dry up in summer is a sign that the water is going to be mist. When your baby opens his mouth six inches square, and turns black in the face till the silence grows painfully ominous, it is a sign of an approaching squall. When tho subjects of King Alphonso, who are ripe for a republic, hear that their king has beon insulted in republican France, it is a sign. of a protracted reign. When in the winter you sec two boys behind a rence, industriously working some white substance iu their hands with a circular, churning movement, look out for snow. The rapid approach of the time when congress meets is a sign of wind. When a young and very bashful man makes an afternoon call, and he is given the baby to hold for a few minutes, it acts like thunder. When you see a partridge running frantically through the brush and loudly veiling "Turn tho rascals out!" it is a sign sho is trying to direct your attention away from hor nest. When a match Is to take place at tho country school-house, and tho night is so stormy that not ono of tho pretty girls can get there, look out for a dry spell. When you see a woman with one loose lock of hair straggling down her nock it is a sign that something is going to hair-pin. When the car door opens and discloses a young man in painful gloves, and a girl in a dress that doesn't fit hor, and they both step on the young man's feet, and the girl sits down hard on the iron arm of a scat, you may know that the tied is coming in. _________..... When you see a fat man out in tho barn turning madly at a crank, with an anxious woman fluttering over him, whilo insido tho house tho company aro wandering aimlessly about the rooms and wondeiing whon tho refreshments aro coming on, it is a sign that ice is forming slowly. But no sign is always to bo depended upon, as tho tobacconist sadly remarked when his Indian toppled off the stand and killed a little boy who was coming In to buy fifteen conts' worth of snuff for his aunt. Reafl our Prices for Honest fearing fell MaJe ClotMi. One Lot Men's Cassimere Suits, Heavy Winter Weights, well made and durable, only $7.00 per Suit. One Lot Men's Strictly All Wool Suits, They would be cheap at 13.00! Our Price is Only 10 per Suit. One Lot Men's Fine All Wool Suits I Well-made Suits, that we guarantee cannot be bought outside our store for less than .'15. Our Price is Ouly $12 per Suit. Our 13,11, 15, IS, 17 Ml IS DOLLAR SUITS Are from, 2 to 4 dollars Less than other dealers' Prices. MENS ALL WOOL PANTS, Heavy Weights, only $2, $2.50 and $3.00. OVERCOATS $4.00,5.00,6.00,7.00,8.00,10.00 13.00,13.00, 15.00, 1G.OO, 18.00 [nnd 20.00, We guarantee to save you from $1.00 to $4.00 by purchasing your Overcoat of us. MENS HEAVY REEFERS, Iu Great Variety. One lot Men's Heavy _ __. __    Reefers onlv--$3i)Q. Ask us to show you our $3 Reefer. Boys' and Children's Suits for Fall and Winter! Our stock largir than ever.  We still sell Boys' Suits, age t to 11 years, for $1.00. from Boys' Suits, ranging in Price $X to $io. PANTS ran "ins in price from $1.00 to $7.00 Per Pair. Wc carry' the Largest Stock of OVERCOATS in this city. One lot Men's Heavy Black Beaver Overcoats only $5, Other dealers sell them for $7.00. Boys' Overcoats In Great Variety.  We have them as low as $1.50, from that up to $11. We carry tho Largest Stock of UNDER WEAR In Bath.  Shirts and Drawers from 20 cents up to $2.50." Cardigan Jackets in^reat Variety. NEW AND NOBBY HATS AND CAPS, For Fall aud Winter Wear. Gloves and Hosiery. The Past and Future OF A MUTUAL FRIENDSHIP I We renew tho pledge made four years ago. Eight successful business seasons tell the 9tory of its fulfillment by us, and its appreciation ay the people!  Our part was to sell Honest Clothing by Daylight Methods at Least Prices. The People's part was to believe us and act on that belief. The result is the Largest Retail Clothing business in Bath! On our part tho futme will be to surpass the past! The stock will be bigger, better, and least in prices. Questions of Clothing, qualities and prices shall not be decided against usif decided upon merit. ISAACSON'S Boston Branch Clothing House, Front Street, opposite Ferry, Bath, Me. NEW   YORK   FASHIONS. Winter Materials ;-Out Door Garments; -The Perils of Gray ;-Wings in Millinery ;-Mannish Hats ;-Velvets. [From our Special Corre*pontltnl.\ Nothing more notable than fine wools, diversified by small, slender loaves of chenille set at short intervals.  They are ! attached only by the stem, and are seen j in twos, threes, or groups.of four ami  five together; having space enough bo- j tween to show them off to ndvantage. I Quiet styles are in unison as to color, but  again we see stylish contrast.   Such material, however, as it may readily appear, j would not answer for tho entire dress, j but rather for effective touches, and on j tho counter beside it is shown plain-sur- j faced goods that will compose most of the outfit.   Bourettesconie up again, bo- j cause of their roughness probably, and i there are the Bison cloths, reckoned ex- i treniely stylish, loosely twilled and cov-1 ercd with a fleece like Canton flannel. I These too are to be made in combination, I and together with the solid piece is: shown ono wrought in some rather con-1 spicuous pattern but clouded by its downy veiling.   One of rich fore3t green with a deep border of crimson'stamped in imitation of embroidery is being made up.for-a-young-lady -protegee. -of-M-rs-A- T. Stewart, and will bo very becoming to her slender figure and dark complexion. CLOAKS. We cannot let it go-the fur-lined circular; the ideal of n winter covering for comfort and convenience. Nor can the elegance of tho long cloak, the jauntinoss of the short dolman, or the girlish possibilities of the jacket be improved upon. One and all wo have them, so nearly like last winter's that last winter's will nnswerjevery purpose. Numbers of rich cloaks and combination costumes as well, indeed, are being made up of broehe Nonpareil velveteen. Introduced last season, it has proved a great success, not only from its handsome appearance but from the fact that the figures are woven, not stamped, and therefore very lasting, since stamped patterns look common, and soon get into ridges. The extraordinary demand far velvet has given impetus to the supplying of a substitute, and this year many jackets aod costumes are made of Baveno" velveteen, which from its thickness of surface, closeness and depth of pile and purity of color is mistaken for Genoa velvet. Lovely suits for children are composed of it, nnd juveniles and mamas have choice among all the new shades; "Mascot" (copper color), plum, ruby, mouse, brown and gray. A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING. The fashionableness of gray.Jeads mo to give a word of caution on that subject. It is a color which should bo prohibited except to the chosen few who have exceptionally good complexions, and yet it is one that bad-complexioned people are particularly fond of wearing. The forlorn looking'areTmnde ten times more forlorn; the worn looking ten limes more worn. This, doubtless, is from a fear of being too gay. One need not bo gay, but one can refrain from being a fright, and what need of that when there i3 deep brown, green, blue, and the like, if one does not wish black? These colors are quiet enough, while Tit the same time handsome and full of safety as gray is of peril. If I were giving advice to Mrs. Langtry I should by all means recommeail gray. It would make her exquisite complexion still more exquisite, and she does well to show off her complexion, for it is her special charm. How muuh it is worth, a bit of gossip goes to show, inasmuch as wo are told that tho famous English-toilet soap house of A. & F. Pears of London, the largest soap manufacturers in the world, recently offered the British government a gratuitous supply of the entire stationery required for the takiDg of tho census -involving an outlay of half a million dollars.providedMrs. Lingiry'scommendation of their soap should be printed on the back of each of the fifty million forms. Tho proposal has been considered at a Cabinet Council of Ministers. ' a'tempt, I would also say "beware." j C.ipole bonnets are in great ascenden-j cy, and come provided with strings j about two inches and a half wide. I Many of these are of velvet ribbon and a majority of hats nnd bonnets are of the same material laid plainly on the frame. Too much indeed cannot be said regarding tho fashionableness of velvet in all departments of dress. I.ICY CAKTEIt. FORGET ME NOT. After Alfred De Mttitet,-Boston Transcript. Forget me not, wlu'ti opens timid dawn ' Her palace of enchantment to the sun : Forget me not, when 'nculh her silvered vault The pensive night her course In dream* doth run; At pleasure's magic calls, when heaves your breast; When darkness gently linen to thoughts of rent, From distant forest hear A voire that murmur* clear- Forget me not! Forget me not, when destiny unkind From you forever my poor sell" shall part; When sorrow, exile and the weary years At last have broken my despairing heart; Think of my hapless love! Think of my lust adieu! Absence and time are naught to lovers true; And while my heart shall beat, To yon ltjjhull repeat- .......Forget me not! Forget me not, when underneath the rarth My broken heart forever coldly sleeps; Forget me not, when o'er my silent grave The solitary (lower softly creeps. You'll see me not, but, like a sister true, My-deothleSB-aouHwill-hn*tcrrbnck-to-yoUT     - When night around you lies," Hark to a voiee that crie Forget me not! ON THE CHOICE OF WEATHER. Louite Lnoyen (rttiney in Shall I desire The blossomed languorous months my Boston Trmicript. realms to And south winds blowing from the sea? The dewy meadow In warmth and shadow, And oaks that sunbeams erest with tangled fire? Ah, no! nh no! But close abou t my castle, age on n^e, The starry Winter for my heritage : Ah, no! ah. no! Hut lone bright mountains, -       And prisoned fountains, ' To enchanted silence and the roaming snow. AN OLD TIME "TALLY HO." Tom Brown, the coachman of the Comet, allows only fifty seconds for changing horses-smart's the word with him. Tom in the neat white hat, the clean, doeskin gloves, the well-cut trousers and dapper frock-we quote a contemporaneous portrait-jis the pink of J^rvies. The coach is a strong, well-built, canary-colored drag; a bull's head on the doors, a Saracen's head on the hind boot. It carries fourteen passengers, nnd goes ten miles an hour, guarantcetl pace. There is a big bell-mouthed blunderbuss, ready for the Ttirpin boys; there are two pistols in the cases; there is a lamp on each side tho coach, and another gleams out under the boot-board. In fifty seconds three grays and a piebald have replaced the three chestnuts and a bay. The ostler fastens the last buckle; the coachman's foot is already on the roller bolt. "How is Paddy's leg?" he asks as he settles down to his seat and shakes out the reins. "Nearly right, sir," replies the horse-keeper, twitching off the last cloth. "Let 'em go then," says the great artist, "and take care of yourselves." The spankers strike out and away thoy go, over what coachmen used to call "the hospital ground" from Houns-low to Staines. The coachman generally sprang his cattle over this bit of level, where there was no pebble bigger than a nutmeg. They kept for it nil the "box-kickers" and stiff mouthed old platers, whose backs would not hold an ounce down hill or draw an ounce up- queer tempered creatures that were over the pole one day and over the bars the next. So they used to flash past the Scotch firs where Mr. Steelo was murdered, and the pond where Mr. Mellish was killed, anil by the turn where Courthorpe Knalchbull beat off tho four scoundrels, and the placo where Turpin, according to Mr. Samuel Weller, let fly at the Bishop's too-has ty coachman : WINGS. Ono needs but a glance to notice wings! in millinery.   Set about in all sorts of1 ways and qpmbjnations which stylish! milliners have"' made tire right ways. ] They stand stiff and upright like the pal- j ings of a fence, aro placed fl illy and In succession like bands, or peer up siugly. | Others are grojped from a centre with j   .. tho look of a great prickly pompon, and i lar10 small birds with wide-spread pinions do | the same.   Single feathers too (some-' times gilded) are set in bunches, or even a solitary large one occasionally reminds us of tho goose quill of former days. The mixture of wings, birds, etc., with ostrich plumage 13 moreover a novel feature of the season, and oftentimes a towering wave of ostrich feathers nods above a recumbent songster, or a saucy wing looks out from the midst of equally refined surroundings.   It is on poke bonnets, however, or hats, that most of these eccentricities find room, since capotes aro too small to allow a needful scope. Wings are especially suited to a very MANNISH shaped hat, which will lose something of its mannishness nnd become distinguished when properly softened by feminine adjuncts. The brim is medium as to width and perfectly straight around; the crown large nnd high, rising straight likewise. It is trimmed with a band or bands, and on ono side a [ wing, pompon or bdnch of tips. Worn by a lady of fine figure and regular features, this will be a very striking sort of a hat,but Bhould the wrong woman get hold of one, I can imagine nothing more disastrous. It is full of danger and beautiful possibilities as well, and while therefore I would encourage an And just put a couple of balls in his nob. And perwailed on Lim to stop. TABLE TALK. Every lady who.president a.table interestedHo know,how she can* depend upon having things come  upon the as she would like them.   How are   remarks   like this made:' This is just my fate;\when I especially want a nice thing, somehow or other, it turns out poor!" A lady expects company for tea. Sho orders, for instance, biscuits, and they are brought to the table heavy and indigestible. How many housekeepers can testify to mortification, as well as disappointment, under such circumstances! It may not, however, have occurred to them that it is not always the "cook's fault." Your bisouits, cakes, pot-pies, puddings, otc, etc., cannot be raised with earth or worlhloss substitutes, nnd it becomes your own fault when you permit any Baking Powder to come into your kitcuon about which you know absolutely nothing as to its purity or hcalthfulness. The market i3 flooded with "low-priced" Baking Powders, gotten up to make an unjust profit by unscrupulous manufacturers and dealers, and it is worthy the attention of all housekeepers to note there is at least one brand of Baking Powder distinctly sold upon its merits, and which can be relied upon for uniform strength and purity. The lloyal Baking Powder, now known almost tho world over as a standard article, has stood the test of nearly a quarter of a century, and its friends among the ladies are legion. is   

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