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Independent Junior: Saturday, October 6, 1883 - Page 1

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - October 6, 1883, Bath, Maine                                ( VOL. IY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 0, 1883. NO. 44. DO.FOYE & CO., Wholesale and Rctnll Dealers In STAPLE AND FANCY aROOBBIES JWAlso rill 1 Stock Froah Meats dally received. JAMES B. DRAKES LAUNCH OF THE KELLY. I -DEALER IN- Pressed Hay and Ice. GRANITE BLOCK, BATH.    -     __MA.HSTE. CO TO L. CHASE'S H. FRESH MEATS, For a GOOD TRADE In ....AND.. GROCERIES, Anil you wil go again. He keeps nothing but tirstclasH goods, and .sella at Reasonable Prices for Cufcli. IS-Ship Stores a Specialty. TRY HIM. ORDER YOUR PROVISIONS -AT- Russell's Market, Where mny lie found at rill limes a Flue Assortment of Meats,. Vegetables, Country Produce, And everything linunllv found In a First-Class Market. WALTER S. RUSSELL, 146 FRONT ST. S. L. FARRAR, Would respectfully call the attention of the people of Bath to Ills large and varied xtoi-k of llrsl clans STOVES & RANGES Whieli will lie Hold'cheap as the cheapest, and war. ranted im represented in every cane. 1 have in my Htores a full line of the Celebrated Crowds Present and Notables In Abundance. The Biggest Ship Yet Launched from Local Ways. Description of the Vessel and Points of Interest. New Hub Ranges Which HtnndH unrivalled aR the BEST RANGE OF THE TIMKS. OH and examine its wonderful Reflex Orate and Oscillating Oven Shelf und Large Oven. I shall bIbo, for the Fall Trade, have a largo and varied (dock of ELEGANT PARLOR STOVES and will, endeavor to suit all in Price and Quality. ' 'A Jobbing and House Work Promptly attended to by competent workmen. Center Street, near City Hall. FALL GOODS -AND- Overcoats, THICK SUITS, ETC, Made to Order, Stylishly, Reasonably, and Dur albly, 0 -AT- SNOW'S. [Specially Reported by Our Young Man.] The stereotyped salutations of "nice weather this," "chilly, ain't it?" "good rain," etc., gave way last Wednesday to "go'�S to the launching ?" and the ques-tion was most generally answered in the affirmative, for who was there that didn't waii.tAo..see..laundie.d..tlvc..biggestslupxvct.v built in Maine ? Ladies left their dinner dishes unwashed, and some even deferred dinner in order to go to the great event. A large number were at the yard and secured ..good-places as early as I-.' o'clock. The ship didn't launch until two. As the hour oi the launching drew near the streets leading to the yard were lined with hurrying people, and alive with hacks and other vehicles. An excursion from along the K. & L. Railroad, and another lrom Lcwiston, the latter bringing quite a crowd, helped to swell the numbers at the "Beehive," which at the climax must have numbered over 1000 people. "They've come from the most remote parts of the world to see, this "I>-^I) .SIUl' I.MWL'IIKn," said one mechanic who couldn't understand what people could see in a ship launch to make-such a fuss over. I'Verc were a number present from that city ot spindles, Lewiston, who had never been to a launching before. One of these had the whole modus operandi of launching a ship explained to him by an obliging ship carpenter, and he returned to his friends and informed them about "wedging up," and "splitting out the blocks," and made the matter just as clear as mud to them. "She's pretty thin forward for a freighting vessel of this class," said one man as he craned his nock and glanced up her graceful stem, which towered in front of him. The ship was'on the southern stocks of (ioss & Sawyer's yard. Good vantage ground from which to see tho launching was from the deck of a schooner building on the next ways, from the wharf below, and from the rising ground up by Goss it Sawyer's office, and all these were black with people. Out itr the stream was the Sasanoa,having a crowd onboard, and the steam yacht Juno. Levi W. Houghton, the veteran shipbuilder, was on board of the latteiv, AMONll TU6.SK I'RKSKXT from Thomaston, which itself can proudly claim to have launched some monster ships, were captains John B. Emerson, N. 1>. Jordan, William Masters, William t'olley and Warren Mills, Alfred Sherman, of the shipbuilding firm of Sherman, (Jerry & Co., and J. A. Patterson. From Brunswick there were W. B. Spear, superintendent of the Dcnnison Mf'g Co., Captains Henry Otis and wife, 1'. C. Merriaui, J. 1'. Delano and A. C. Otis and ('apt. II. C. Orr, of Freeport, and Mr. John Dike the Brunswick Herald | man, A. (J. Staples of the Lewiston Journal. From Portland, Captains Frank Delano, John P. Waterhouse (for whom (Joss. Sawyer & Packard are building a ship) captain Loring, and Mr. Foss Frank, of the Cape Cottage Hotel, Cape Elizabeth From Boston, 11. L. Fehring, of the firm of II. L. Fehring & Co., Steamship Agent Lombard, Cunt. Beal and Mr. Sonic and wife. Capt. Henry Rogers of San Francisco. Capt. Dinsmore of Richmond, Frank Reynolds of New York. About all the Bath shipbuilders were among the spectators, among them being noticed IIon.: William Rogers, Arthur Scwallf L. W. Houghton, Henry L. Houghton, John McDonald, II. F. Morse, T. M. Hagan, W. T. Donnell, Z. II.. Blair, G. M. Adams and Kldbridge Sottlcj Of ex-builders, Amos L. Allen and Asa P. llodgkins. Among tho Bath sea captains present were Lincoln Patten, P. M. Whitmore, 11. P. Manson, C.F. Patten, A. P. Hutehins, Capt. Rairden, Joseph Small, S. T. Woodward, Pilot Pinkham, Charles M. Morse, Inspector George A. Preble, T. P. Gibbons and John D. Bib-bpr. Outside of "old salts," His Honor Mayor Ledynrd, John Elliott, II. B. Swnnton, J. T. Donnell, Sheriff Ballou, ex-Mayor Richardson, II. E. Palmer, G. W. Patten, Geo. Fisher, D. O. Foye, Judge Gilbert, Postmaster Hogan, Isaiah Crooker, P. II. Newman, Geo. Litchfield, C. II. McLellan, J. A. Me-Lellan, Supt. Coombs, Conductors Cobb und Dillon, and many notable gentlemen witnessed the launching. At just two o'clock THE LEVIATHAN STARTED, und slid smoothly and swiftly into the wnter, throwing up a great wave behind her as Iter prow stink deeply into the river. It was a grand and impressive spectacle, so much so that not a cheer disturbed the silence. As soon as she had gotten fairly into the rivor the anchors were let go, and the chains flew out at such' a rate ns to smoke, and make a great clatter. Both anchors were dropped. All the steamers of the river, including the' Star, which was at her. wharf, blew salutes to tho great ship for all they were worth, and tho mills along shore joined in tho din. THE NEW SHIP WAS BUILT by Goss & Sawyer, and is named the John R. Kelley, in honor of as ablo a seaman and as fino a gentleman as ever trod it quarter-deck. He is widely esteemed by a multitude of friends. Her owners are-Charles Davenport, C. E. Moody and Capt. John R. Kelley of Bath; E. C. Allen, tho noted publisher of Augusta; James F. Chapman of San Francisco; Goss & Sawyer.and Capt. T. P. Gibbon, who will command her. She is the largest sailing ship except the "Great Republic" ever built in this country. She will rank Lloyds A."l. She is ns beautifully modelled and staunch a vessel as skilled brain and brawn can mako. Those who ought to know say her frame is exceptionally heavy and superior. She will go into the California trade. Thc.ship's dimensions arc as follows: Length-.'56.!� ft; breadth 45 If;  depth' 28 ft; gross tonnage 230i.'M; net ton-j nage '2'2i)i.oi>.   Her lower masts are of, steel, made at   the Goss Marine Iron Works-which by the way shut down tor the launch.    The fore and main masts are 89 feet long and the mizzen 8ii.   The topmasts of the fore and main masts arc Mi feet long,   the   to'gallant masts 28, royal! 19, skysatlmasts 15; the lengths on 'Hie mi/zen iiiast are: tophiast "40 feet\ to'gallant 21, royal-mast 1C>, and skysail-mast I.'!. The yards on the fore and main masts are: lower yards 90 feet, lower topsail Written for the Indi'.i'KMient. A SEVERED LINK. INDEPENDENT ITEMS. Obliging Behavior.of the Seasons. The golden cord that links our souls in holy tie Is severed now, By mutual wish we meet troin hence for aye, with friendship's vow. God help me now to-act a brother's pan. And still the cravings of 'my wounded henVt. Wc must not spoak of future .oneness, must not ill cam of what should lie, Hut live that our put more than friendship, may to others seem a blank nonentltv. WRITTEN lOlt THE II.VTII IMIKI'1'.NMI'..NT ItY \v. o. rii.n;it, .in. 82, upper 7:3, to'gallant yards (50, royal yards 19, skysailyards 110. On the miz-zenmast. the cross jack yards are 72, lower topsails (i-l, upper mizzen topsail 59, to'gallant 48, royal yards :39, and sky- j sail yards .'! 1. i All the  standing rigging is imported j steel wire from Glasgow.   Her two chain1 cables are 90 fathoms each of 2 1-8 inch! chain.    They are from II. L. Fehring it Co., Boston.    Manton's   Providence windlass No. 11 she carries, and a Kendall & Roberts double cylinder engine that has connection with windlass and pumps. Her anchors weigh .>(i()0 pounds each and are from the Camden Anchor Works. The Kelley was coppered on the stocks - lOoO sheets were used each weighing* from 18 to 24 ounces. The master builder was E. Sawyer of the firm of Goss & Sawyer; master joiner Amos Ilaggctt; master caulker G. S. Brown; master blacksmith, Howard Spear; master fastener Benj. F. Brown. She was draughted by Potter & Hideout; blocking, Duncan & Jackson; spar makers, Wiggin & Dain, and (Joss Marine Iron Works; upholsterer, II. A. Turner; rigger, Francis DoLocJic; sails, W. P. Cutler & Son. She has 9700 yards of sail including 2000 spare sails. N. C. Gielstrup, our artistic fancy and fresco painter, is to decorate her cabin. Joseph Ebell will do the plain painting.   The Kelley will HE lTTTEH FOR SEA at once and will sail for New York in the course of three or four weeks. All the owners of the Kelley mentioned above were present to sec her take her initial dive into the sea. It was a most successful launching and witnessed by.the largest crowd ever assembled upon such an occasion. ----------------- SOME OBSERVE Yet do not chide me if I sometimes drop a tear When save ourselves, our presence only, God is near. Our lips mtiKt never kiss again, r never more must rest ] My weary, aching head in your dear arms, your face must ne'er to mine be pressed, i For love is blighted, dead-but would you treat j      nic harshly If I touched that hand, And breath upon that.linger, free as yet from I golden band ? And if sonic day another takes the place that I have lost, Tho' pale and wan, please let me conic and see you happy, at whate'er the cost. I'll be a man in every act and word.   I'll be so circumspect and true That he. will neycr.dveam of thejlovc. l've-bournc. lor you. One bitter, cruel, stinging word may suddenly unlink love's golden chain Tho' pleadingly explained, that love would shrink from budding forth again. The scar 'remains while here rctuiding perfect bloom, The flower is only blighted in that land beyond the tomb. What is the legitimate connection between a\ \ horse-race and an agricultural lair ? The comet of 1812 is now on a visit to this! country.  The question is, Will it demand a pension ? A short water crop in Maine is a more serious j | affair than it would be in some states.  We | drink water here. his birthplace,; town to have Hannibal Hamlin gives Paris, a. town clock. It pays for a great men horn in it. It is now discovered that Washington used to weigh 20!l pounds. (Icorgc was in inure respects than one a heavy man. "A   Woman's   Benson,"   Howell*'   latest work, is just issued by Osgood in book form. We always supposed a woman's "Because." ;head : ride. That musicians are mortal. That Blind Crossing is a nuisance. That water works are a necessity. That the collector of taxes is busy. That the electric light isn't here. yet. That skates are being polished for use. That a certain firm can't get vessels taken up. That a certain broker makes .* 10,0l>:> a year. That short sermons cause bigger congregations. That 1) (and the rest) is a better farmer than writer. That Miss L. is the most stylish girl in St. Mary's society. That some folks have of the Goss Iron Works. That certain local politicians would give their old boots to be mayor. That a new fire-alarm system should be obtained and put in use. ThattJje city government is higher authority rhan heads of departments.       �. > That the Bees should give an oyster stip^ per for the beuefit of the poor. The expense of ringing the city bell at morning, noon, sunset and nine o'clock is useless. That making shanties into THE PLUG HAT FEVER. Pfck'* Sun. "Have you ever been attacked with the plug hat fever ?" asked an old gentleman the other evening, and, without waiting for a reply, went on to relate his own experience, and to tell the result of his own observation.   I never knew of a young man who, when he had reached an age between eighteen and twtnty-five, but what ho had the plug hat fever to a greater or less severity.   He wil] suffer iv great deal, too, before it fairly breaks out. and he gets a shiny tile on his heiid.   Then he suffers severely for several days after he gets the hat, and he is conceited enough to believe the eyes of the whole world are j upon him.   He will wish for the first j day or two that he hadn't got it, and i then nvain he'll pluck up enough grit to ! wear it in spite of every thing.   Next ! to the moustache ambition, the plug hat fever strikes to the very vitals:   The first symptoms of the fever makes its presence known by the victim's visiting some hat store, and trying on half a dozen silk hats, and looking admiringly in a mirror.   He will put it on square, then cock it over on the right" side, then hang it on his left ear, and smile with satisfaction at the imago of himself under the hat in the mirror.   A young calf tinder a new shed couid not feel prouder of itself, than the young man with goose-down on his upper lip, when he first beholrls his manly brow in a looking-glass, supporting a shiny silk hat.   It's too overcoming for anything, and in a great many   instances it is more overcoming than becoming.   But Ihen they must have 'em  no matter '� about the expense.   Finally the lial is 1 purchased, put in a hat-box and conveyed to the young man's room with the great-; est of care and fond expectations of the manliness it will give the wearer in the near future.   For a week, maybe, he i will exercise tho hat by weiring it in his room lor a few hours every evening. Fi- nally he gets his courage to the pitch, and on an auspicious Sunday evening starts for church with the hat nicely setting on tho top of his head.  He knew he would i attract attention and, the first street urchin , he meets calls attention to it by shout-' ing 'shoot the hat.'   Now how did that I young heathen come to notice anything : new or novel in tho hat?   It is easily explained.   When a man wears u plug I hat on the street for the first time he ! gives himself away by his I'm-on-dress-i parade air.   He will walk as carefully as though trying to balance a pail of water on his head and expecting every moment that it will tip off and douse I him.   It don't squeak like a new shoe to I attract attention, but it stiffens up the i spine in an unusual and unnatural de-I gree.   It takes several public nppenr-Wmces in the new plug to again limber : up the spine to its normal condition. ] Arriving at church the young man hesi-| tates for an instant about going in, but | remembering an appointment to see a j young lady home, he braces up, stiffly j holds tho determined-to-nttract attention tenements , silk hat over his right fore arm, and This country annually pins. When a girl liiuls one of them lyin to her it is a sign she is going to have a .... g^yy cvcry'libily oTiKlit t 'j;o ti')"lied at dark. You can always tell when a man who owns an orchard has a neighbor with :i family of boys. The Baltimai'c judge who has decided that law cannot restrain the use of a woman's tongue has discovered no new principle. Everybody knew it couldn't. Sentiment grows in favor of cheaper funerals. It's a clear ease of foolishness to waste a t wo hundred dollar funeral on a hundred and twentv-tive dollar man. The sting of a wasp it is said sometimes produces death. Thank goodness you have escaped for another summer, and the next time you sit down on a w.tsp do it in the dead of winter. There arc some disagreeable features connected with the cool weather. One of them is the alarming tendency of the. summer fly to congeal on the chandelier above the breakfast table and plump down into your coffee. It's an evidence of progression that a min- j othcr istcrof the gospel is to-day permitted to ride ' the bicycle.  Two hundred years ago if lie hud tried such a thing the   people would have driven a stake through him and pinned him to the nearest convenient cross-roads. Maiihultan /or October. Very neighborly and obliging arc the four seasons, readily leading their effects to each other in a way most confusing to the careful annalist who tries to keep the score.   Tt is to be presumed that, if an exact record were kept of all these londings and borrowings, the account would be found to balance at the end of the year; meanwhile, it is a source of perplexity to see'October occasionally wearing apple-blossoms in his crown, or December   spreading over his rough tent-poles tho ethereal canopy of June; to see April pretending to go to sleep, wrapped in a cobweb coverlet borrowed  from the Indian-Summer sky, or merry May personating   November,   with n presence so chill and forbidding that all the courtiers tremble and forget their honeyed speeches.   Long before the autumn is openly proclaimed 1 perceive its omissvries and dcplomats are|with us. At the very height of summer's supre-reasou was1 mncy there is secret defection; brides ! have been given and taken : treason is brewing.  Under its dull green cloak, the produces T,(100,0(10 ;, apple-tree hides a bright golden bough, ih it surclv would win for its bearer the favor of Proserpine.   In the deepest retired places of-'-the; woods sedition has . been busy: that false-hearted tree, tho pepperidge, has been   transferring its allegiance to the enemy, strewing the dark mosses with its pied red and yellow leafage.   No arts employed by summer, ! no  spectacles intended to  prove her j power and prosperity, can make me for-; get the ominous handwriting I have seen ! in the forest temple.    Also, when in i August I find and taste that pleasant, ! quasi-tropical fruit, the mandrake npple i (in the  botany described as ''slightly i acid, mawkish, eaten.by pigs and boys.") I seem to acquire additional knowledge j of tho plans and movements of autumn. I It is alwaysj with some surprise that I | mark the reappearance   of the   small i floral stir that moves in the front of i the seison; can it asain be time for the ! aster?   With the aster the golden-rod. | The two   set out   for a, long ramble | through the country.   Their association j is of mutual advantage,  inasmuch as each affords a chromatic foil for the MAKING LOVE IN THE CHOIR. I'uck. She Kut on the stepx of the organ loft Jnst after the seeond hymn; And through the nave anil ehoir to the cool gray Hliiie The tiound roue faint and dim, Ah they HcUle 0c lb (iOc lb 00c lb 40 Sc fide lb 40 it Me lb 30c lb to these sold at per lb. more. 5c. per lb. allowance on purchases] of o lbs., and special prices by the chest. irden Formosa, "      "      "      Japan, "      "      Breakfa.-t, Superior Formosa's, Superior Japan's, Choice Oolong and Japan, Our Tens at fitle are equal most places at from 10 to 2oc. COFFEES! Very Best Pure Mocha, YervBest Mocha and O. G. Java, A .Word of Caution. Railroad men, mechanics, commercial travelers, base ballists, farmers, and others who labor out of doors, are peculiarly liable to accident and injury. Thomas' Ecleetric Oil fur bruises, burns, bites and sprains, is one of tho finest' application yet devised mentally swears vengeance on the usher who prances him up to the front pew in tho centre of the church for no other purpose than to call attention, in his mind, to the new plug. Eight out of ten first-time-I-wore-a-plug-hat young men will becomo so agitated that instead of putting the hat on the floor out of the way, will place it on the scat and forget to remove it when tho usher shows some one else in for the sole purpose, in his mind, of having them sit on it and wreck it. It's a good thing to have the first plug wrecked in this way, because the first hat, has got to be wrecked, but it is generally done by some kind friend who sneaks up behind, jams it down over your ears and is away before you fairiy understand n brick block hasn't tumbled onto you. A plug hat is probably tho most dressy hat, but heavens! how it man suffers when the fever first fully develops itself to a head. There was an ecltspo thjs year that astronomers tailed to note. It was the eclipse of Adamson's Botanic Balsam over all competitors. It cares coughs, colds, and nil diseases of tho throat, chest and lungs. Price 10, 35 and 75 cents. hi: made it ci.eah. ; "What's this Dead Scott decision about:"! queried Mrs. Wigglesworth, looking up from i the paper. j "Dread Scott--not Dead Scott," corrected Mr. Wigglesworth, with a man's patronizing �mib of superiority. "Well. Dread Scott, then.  What is it �" Mr. Wigglesworth was stuck, but he looked wise. "Something to do with the Mexican war," he explained; "Gen. Scott, you know, was a terrible lighter, and tho greasers got to referring to him as Dread Scott. Some decision or other he made about a battle is what the papers menu." Mrs. Wigglesworth with a satislicd air folded the paperback and turned to see if any new Very Best Fancy Kio, Very Choice Uio, A discount on the above prices by lar's worth. Hoc lb 32c lb 30c lb 24c lb 18e lb 14c lb the dol- to 50c. FLOUR Marked Down 2 per Barrel. FOYE & CO., Front St., Opp. Columbian Hall* BATH, 3VC^.X3NTX:. SCHOOL SUPPLIES! W. S, SHOREY, ! j people had been born, while Mr. Wiggles wort li1 I winked to himself at his having got out of it! j so smoothly. j   "All a woman nec.ls," he mentally remarked, I "is to have a thing explained o-ie way or uu-. other.  Don't matter what you tell 'em, so long as it's something.  It's a mighty sight easier than having to answer a hundred questions. ' Makes 'em respect u man, too." OPPOSITE CITY Has HALL, everything required for -use In tho Schools. Composition BooUh 5 els. Noto I'liper 3 etn. a quire und upwurds. Fools' Cup Paper G ota. Primary School Writing Books, Sec. ScIiooIh Hii^h, Lunch Boxen, Luneh llasketu, �chcol Companions, and a Ucneral Assortment of IFANCY GOODS. CALL AND SEE.   

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