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Independent Junior: Saturday, July 28, 1883 - Page 1

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - July 28, 1883, Bath, Maine                                1 � * B.+l as am a-; T   � L- ' t -     I - -      V �1, mm L i I-1 W - i 1 �f f - J 4 * r   . T   : h t j - r i i - - + r      n ' 'i r j  � - -t - i, i -i* " A .4 r - �1- . r x � * * - I   -        H - i. --F     J -i1 D W'"- ^r^"r>�^�^^^;^�^� -7-----:-- - 4 - 4 � "�  � ^      K r_ � "1L VOL. IV. SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1883. NO. 34. Hun     E b     1 v-,' ...... it.-.--. \ ��----�   u-+     - *     ��        -   F H  t -l       r    *-   -r-      * -     p A SALT ~ T F       ^ r + .i - i x ^ - � f b vj-       . . bF    - t Mouse Island under the � New Management. The Scenery and Walks-Germania Band Concert-Rosewood Cot-tage-Pretty Waiter Girls Visitors thus far:this Sea- Last Winter's Wreck. A Sail. JUST RECEIVED ance of the Island in Years Agone. ......at...... HALLET i/ DRUG STORE A LARGE STOCK OF PURE AND PATENT MEDICINES Which wc arc selling at the LOWEST CASH PRICES 5 h l' SODA WATER, V I>rawn from a NEW FOUNTAIN, flavored from Pure Fruit Juice, at 5 cents per glues.  , At A FULL LINE~0F~tUNDBOR(ysr PERFUMES. HALLET'S DRUG STORE, The city editor desiring a letter from Mouso Island sent down the humorist, with tho injunction to be serious, which, as will be seen from the loiter, he obeyed very well. Without any preliminaries he strikes boldly into his points at beautiful Mouse Island itself, the Bijou island of the Bay. The Samosei has 70 sleeping rooms, well furnished; the beds and clothing are superior, and plenty of the latter. The upper or third floor rooms, of which there are 23, have dormer windows. They are on each side of a brond hall which runs the length of the hotel, large windows being at the ends. The second door is similar; just the dining room and parlor are on next floor with the office and stair case between them.   Bii- r Hard room in baeement. The parlor in length is the width of the house, 41 feet, and 25 feet wide; hard pine floor, plain white walls, high ceiling, commands fine views on all sides, and is much resorted to by the guests. The house hires a violinist and pianist by the season, and there is an impromptu dance nearly every evening. ..The lady uests also use the nice piano considerate, much to the pleasure of the rest of the "family." "I can't begin to accommodate the people who will be here in August," said Mr. Fan*; '.'one ought to have 50 rooms more to handle tho rush. Had some 75 over Sunday last, 150 to dinner on the 4th-50 from Buth. We shall have one or two hops in August; expect to make arrangements with the Germania B*nd for one. Shall have a German every Friday;_njght Jn August.u_ There seem to be more bathing this season than usual, and warmer water here than elsewhere. Our Mr. A. M. Cutler says the same. He found the water quite comfortable. Mr. Cutler has been at Mouse Island for a week or more recently with friends, and he gave the house several nice compliments while conversing with me on the Sasanoa, returning to Bath. The Samoset is very popular, I find, with the Bath public this year. I found that Mr. Fkrr lias had a wide experience in the hotel business at Skowhegan, at the Elm wood; Boston 3 years at the old Marlboro1 Hotel; his brother ran this 7years; and in Burlington, Vt. "I guess I know about as many : New England people as most anybody else," said he. Mr. Curtis, who acts as steward, looks out for the back of the house, and is associate manager, was three years at the Bangor House and two at the Penobscot exchange. Both are practical men, and are a hard team to beat at running a hotel. Mrs. Farrell, two years at the Sag-ady, here also in 181, a splendid chef de ctlisine, is meat and fish cook, Mrs. Maggie Boyle, a Skowhegan young lady, is the deft pastry cook, Mr. George MoCobb is our efficient office boy," said Mr. Farr, jocosely, as George came behind the counter. He is a smart boy, and this is his fifth sea-son here. George is so willing he gets rewarded in extra shekels "from his friends. "I got $1.60 today," said he. A party had just come in, 10 p. m., from Monhegan, and found a hot supper awaiting tbem that George had reserved. "I've got a fine corps of-table waiters," continued Mr. Fair. (A gentleman near supplemented this with the remark-''finest lot of girl waiters I ever saw.") "I bavo two Colby collegians, and our pioneer boarder this season was Mr. Clearwater of Hallowell. This gentleman is yet'at Mouse and induced some Milwaukee friends there he was so well pleased." - This is a great plaee for school inarms. They come down here in droves every season, take attic rooms and entertain the yachtsmen," said Fan*, with a merry twinkle in his eyes.   "I . Mr. Fan* made me laugh telling of his sail with Mr. Huynes, the '82 proprietor who was down with Mr. Farr for a few days before the season opened. They were at a Boothbay hotel. "Bob took uie* to Mouse in a sail boat. I myself never sailed a boat, never knew anything about one. But, Bob; well, there; he knew; had sailed round there thousands of times.' We had a fair breeze, and blew over nil right. I Imd ordered supper upon our return. We were due at 7.15 back to Boothbay. Well, we had to tack lots and after two hours of Bob's 'great knowledge' manoe-uvering, we were nearer Mouse Island than Boothbay. 'Let's pull down the sail and puddle^ said I, *I can paddle, if I can't pull; they'll think we belong to the coast survey.' Bob was nearly three hours behind schedule time for eupper. His sister said when I told her, Why, Robert never sailed a boat in his life!' Bob tells the story about my begging him to haul the sail down. He'll say, 'you ought to seen Farr saying, piteously, /Til paddle back or anyway to get back." Well, as far as ray knowledge of a boat went I thought if we wanted to reach the placo we'd have to pull the sail down." We notice by the register that Mr. John Fierce, Miss Mamie Pierce, Miss Jennie Pierce and Jack and Mrs. John' Pierce of Sioux City, Iowa, and Mrs. Dr. Smith of Buffalo, N. Y., and Misses Ella and Sallie Cutler of Bath, togelber with Mr. W. Trevor and wife of"N. Y., have been at the Samoset since July Gth, and Miss May Bennett and Mrs. L. Childs of N. Y. since the 10th. Capt. C. C. Duncan and family have also been enjoying Mouse for some time, together with Miss Sadie Duncan of Bath who is a groat favorite, through her many nice social attributes. Miss Trevor of N. Y., also one of the social successes of the season. A Miss Brown from the Wostr is the blue stocking of the family and is the Samoset correspondent of the Squid, and a very nice blue stocking she Is. Miss Helen Moore, a pretty brunette fr^un Philadelphia, and" Miss Bessie Moore a charming Chicago blonde, who knows how to play the violin very agreeably, and a Bath belle, are at present the belles of Samoset. An a sample of the cuisine this year the following bill of fare for Sunday last is appended: Fish Chowder. Clam Chowder. FIH1I. Bahed Cod-Wine Sauce. Baked Haddock-Brown Sauce. Baked Mackerel.     Boiled Cod-Egg Sauce. Boiled Haddock-Samoset Sauce. Broiled Mackerel.      Boiled Halibut-Egg Sauce. cold dishes. Corned Beef. Lamb. Mltchler's Sugar Cured Ham salads. Lobster Sulad.     Potato Salad.      Plain Lobster- * IlELIHIIES. Walnut Catsup.     Pickled Cucumbers. Worcester shire Sauce. Leicestershire Sauce. Cheese." Cucumbers.      Chow Chow.      Tomato Catsup. RELIEVES. BOILED. Bibs of Beef. Ham, Champagne Snuce. Spring Lamb. Corned Beef. Sirloin of Beef, Dish Gravy. ENTREES. Brcust of Lamb, breaded with Tomato Sauce. Kscalloped Claras. Jenny Li ml Pan Cakes. Baked Beans. VEGETABLES. Boiled New Potatoes.      Green Corn.      Turnip. Green Peus.   Mashed Potatoes.    New Beets. String Beans.        Stewed Tomatoes. PASTRY. Indian Pudding. PIES. Apple.        Blueberry. r DESSERT. Vanilla Ice Cream.    Assorted Cake. Mince. Custard. English Walnuts. Layer Raisins. Filberts. Almonds. Pecans. Crackers and Cheese. X3T Sole Agent for Gay's Fills. _ t want this to knock that Pi pbam letter higher than a cocked hat," said ho playfully, **Nobody ever comes here but what is in love with the natural surroundings- the scenery; you can't improve on that. I'm the firmest believer in it myself. I visited the island first last summer, with my wife, nnd remarked it was the most beautiful spot I had ever visited, and I haven't changed my mind about it yet." I inspected the kitchen of Samoset, Tnesjday morning, giving it an unexpected call, and found it as clean as a whittle. Two large ranges, a fish broiler, and a coffee stove, are used. The pastry room was in dress parade order, and also the china closet and laundry. They are awake at Samoset | this season, and the ardent wish of the Independent is that the well directed efforts of Mr. Farr to make the Samoset a popular house may meet with merited reward.    . ---------- The number of employees at the Samoset House is now twenty-five, and it has guests enough to keep them ptetty busy. Nelson Dingley, Jr., M. C. registered Tuesday. In glancing over the names on the register of the Samoset I see that its fame draws people from nearly every state in the union, New Jersey and Pennsylvania are especially well represented. Numerous Bath naraes~are there the season, Among them those of Dr. Bibber and family. W. E. Hogan, Miss Stinson, Miss C. P. Patterson, Zenie Shannon, Annie M. Andrews, M. B. Han scorn b, Kitlie Payne with W. Warden of Paris, G. E. Morse, A. H. Morse. J. W. Ballon, Theo. Kellogg, jr., L. P. Lord, C. C. Low, H. E. Stetson, E. F. Foote, A. G. Page, A. M. Potter, W, A. Potter.  Here is Monday's register: W. W. Howlnnd and wife, Plainfield, N. J. Nelson Dingley, jr., M. C, Lewis ton. W. F. Belcher, Varmlngton. Clarence H. BUko, Cambridge, Mass. Mrs. Lyman W. Wheeler, Boston. Nellie M. Gould, Cambridge, Mass. L. B. Treat, Boston.   " O. E. Treat, Boston. Orville KIjkrs, Portland. Harry O. IMggs, Portland. J. P. Gorman, Brunswick. Mrs. Kate Gorman, Prov. R. I. Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Curtis, Auburn. L. Avery, N. Y. City. Independent, Bath. Dr. Smith, of Buffalo, N. Y., the celebrated Dr. R. V. Pierce's leading physician in his medical faculty, arrives this week, to join bis wife. The ladies play billiards and sippio considerably. A young lady, not at Mon&o though, told me that Old Squirrel was almost as dressy this season ftfl_Long_Branoh^_the,ladie8__wearJng elaborate toilets. The fine $20 000 stone house, Rosewood cottage bus 15rooms (Mr. Farr assigns these rooms to guests who are fond of quiet and retirement) was admired. Its quaint, diamond paned windows and doors, Its old-time red basket-bottom chairs, its open fire-place, with the old brass andirons and tongs, its fine white walls edged with rosewood, its heavy, deep black walnut window frames (you can sit on the wide window seat), its polished dark pine floor-all these things give "a peculiar charm" to tho originally shaped parlor. This cottage was finished 20 years ago by the original proprietor, a Capt. Johnson, who now, with his aged wife, live in Wiscasset in comparative poverty. He was very rich at the time he built, his sails whitening many a sea. He bought Mouse, which by the way, has borne the name of Mouse for many years, of a Mr. Andrews, for $1700. Many Booth-bay gentlemen remember the six charming daughters of Mr. Andrews, and would, in days of yore, like Leinder, have swam to them from the main land if no other way could have brought them to their fair presence. The Association, which now owns Mouse bought from Capt. Johnson, paying him $4,000. It is reported Mouse, about 30 years ago, was for sale at $500. The Samoset proper is now in its ninth season. There aretrorhantie paths which skirt nnd cross Mouse Inland, embowered in fragrant trees; in certain parts of them yon could easily imagine yourself in the heart of a primeval forest. Samoset avenue is along the east side, Trempnt on the west shore, and Broadway winds wildly through the center of Mouso. It is impossible to imagine more charming promenades than Mouse affords, You can go down on the point,- too, and there enjoy the shade trees and the breath from the ocean whose waters languidly lap the shore at your feet. A largo lawn is. connected with the house. Let me not forget to say a word of praise for the pretty and competent young lady waiters of Mouse. On the east side of Mou?e on tho rocks may be seen the ribs and keel of the Thomaston vessel, that all in flame3 was blown upon Mouse last winter in a violent snow storm having parted her chains in the harbor, and her crew left, fearful of being "blown out." 725 casks of lime in her were lost. Mr. J. R. McKeown, the keeper of Mouse for the past 5 years got on boird of her at once by me-ins of a ladder, and with fire all around him, cut away the masts, and saved everything that could be saved. I will not attempt to speak of the vista of delightful scenery seaward from Mouse-an abler pen than mine would falter in the task. When at night the shimmering silvery sea is all aglow with the limpid, lurid loveliness which Luna awakens paling the ineffectual fire of Burnt Island Light, it is then, that, that -Well we'll leave this sentence for Farr to finish in his next season's circular. The air of Mouso Island is very put e, and most sound sleep is found here. It is just as a gentleman remarked Tuesday morning-*'I wake up here at 5 or C a. m.( and feel as well as I do at home.11 Due allowance is made for tired people, as breakfast isTrom 7 to 10," dinner from 1 to 3, and supper from G to 8. The best of friends must part, so on Tuesday, a. m. we stand upon the pleasant spacious wharf of the Island, shake Mr. Curtis heartily by the hand, regretfully step on board the swiftest steamer of the Eastern Steamboat fleet, Capt. Oliver, and the 14 3-4 miles between us and Bath are soon spanned. At tho present time four boats leave Mouse Island daily for Bath, one, the "Islander," con-^ tinning to Augusta. Notes. Picnic parties are welcome to Mouse Island. A long banquet table under cover is on the hill. AMERICAN HUMOR. CURRENT EVENTS. "I am burning to stand at the hend of my class," as tho boy remarked when he threw his schoolmate's exercises into the fire.-Boston Transcript "I have a bright prospect before me," said the loafer. "You always will have," remarked Fogg; I don't think you will ever catch up to it."-Boston Trims' cripl. A New York man has had his head fractured by a bath tub falling upon him. This will teach him hereafter not to fool around a contrivance that he is not familiar with.-Lowell Citizen. It is a very small village indeed that doensn't contain a billiard champion of the United St'ate3. There are more billiard champions in this county today than there are billiard tables by a long chalk.-Burdettc* ' Longfellow said: "In this world a man must be either anvil or hammer.11 Longfellow was wrong, however. Lots of men are neither the "active hammer nor the sturdy anvil. -They.,are nothing but bellows.-Philadelphia 'News. During the hot days last week the most frequent inquiry was, "What's the thermometer?" The New York World furnishes the following answer: "The thermometer is a box with a glass tube nailed inside of it filled with niercuy and was constructed to make people lie and swear." In Goshen, N. Y., a tramp who asked for his breakfast was handed an axe worth three dollars and set to chopping wood to pay for his meal. Instead of performing the task he decamped with the axe. There are a great many able financiers among the tramp fraternity. -Norristown Herald. Yacht men along the Main coast to and from Bar Harbor make Mouse Island a halfway station. We see by the register that quite a number of Bath people have been at Mouse this summer and will try to mention them in a future issue. Mouse boasts of balm of Gilead, chestnut birch and maple trees, outside of its heavy fir growth. The many little "Xmas trees" along Samoset avenue, add much to its attrai tiveness. Yacht Vidette, owned by the President of the Boston & Albany; yacht with Mr. Haskell, jr., son of Boston Herald Haskell, a Harvard chum with him; yacht of the LUtel's of the Living Age] one with Prof. Estey and party of Amherst; and other yachts were in the harbor last week. Nine sail boats now make their headquarters at Mouse, all in the hands of safe skippers, and the house has five row boats. So bay and ocean sails are right at hand.  The small harbor boat of the h r Eastern Steamboat Company may be also chartered by private parties. The bowling alley and two stores are open. The "Revere" and "Tremont" houses are closed as yet, but in their dress of whitewash they are not ugly by any means. Were you ever upon the platform, which is the yard of the Revere House, and noticed how odd it looks to see the seven fir trees growing up through it?- I musn't forget to praise the mineral sp/ing near the hotel. The water was got by blasting fifteen feet in the solid rock, has valuable properties, is two degrees cooler than any other water in the state, and has ah old oaken bucket flavor to it that will, in a jiffy, by the magic power there is in taste, carry a man back to his happy childhood days at the old farm. A St. Louis gentleman who was at Moiwe this season is enthusiastic over the water. A High School graduate, who read an essay a couple of weeks ago entitled "Don't be Idle," devoted four hours Sat-urday to reading a dime novel called "McSwiggin, the Boss Detective," and the day before bo spent the afternoon in fishing and didn't get a bite. We like to see a young man practice what he preaches.-Norristown Herald. Colonel Ingersoll says: "Dorsey is the mo3t forgiving man I ever knew. He bears no malice against any one." It is charming to know that Dorsey has forgiven his enemies. It reminds one of the man who was raising a terrible row because a dog bit him. "What are you making such a fuss about?" demanded the owner of thejdog. "The dog wasn't mad." v'Mad!" howled the man with the bite. "Mad! well, I reckon not! What in thunder has begot to be mad about ?"-Burlington Hatvkeyc. r "Those are five cents, madam," said the fruit dealer to a lady who had just asked the price of some bananas. "Are those five cents?" asked the boy who 'helped1 in the store, after she had gone out. "Certainly they are," answered the proprietor; "Why?" "Because, I didn't sell them for that when you were out." "Then what in time did you sell theiii for ?" shrieked the proprietor, growing very wrcth. "Six, sir," murmured the youth, as he dodged his head. -Lowell Citizen. "See here, landlord, you advertised a big, four-story hotel, with a grove, fountains, bathlngT boating, etc., and I arrive here to find a shanty stuck in tho pine woods and the nearest lake a mile away. Explain yourself, sir!" "With the greatest of pleasure. Tha cut of the hotel was one left on the printer's hands, and he worked it in to fill out the column. I ought to have mentioned in the advertisement that it was a cut of a hotel at Long Branch, but I neglected to. Come right in-beautiful scenery, woods full of snakes, rates down to $4 per day and children charged full prices/*-Detroit Free Press. "Say!" exclaimed a hotel guest, calling the atttention of mi urbane waiter, "this is a terrible deal you are giving mo in the way of butter."   "It's slightly off* color, isn't it?" inquired the waiter.  "I should say it "was."   rRancid?"" "You bet."   "Strong?"   "Strong as a mule." "And fearfully frowy?"   "Worst I ever saw in my life."   " Yes;  well, that proves it's genuine butter, don't it?   If it was oleomargarine there wouln't be a thing the matter with it.  There is considerable difference now-a-days between cuurn butter and painted tallow." -Texas 8iJtingsf NEWSPAPER HONOR. Said Col. G. A. Pierce in an address at Fort Wayne, Ind.:   A short time ago a discussion arose in Chicago as to the relative duty of lawyers and newppapersr and the following query occurred to me: What would be said of any respectable journal that would take a fee for trying to make black appear white-that should undertake the defense of a notorious murderer, for instance?  Not secretly, and while pretending; to be impartial- that, of course, would be intensely hyp) critical and dishonorable-but openly and notoriously ?  The accused party would say: "I want defenders, I will hire lawyer Suoh-a-one and newspaper So-and-so."   What an outcry would go up, and yet what is. it that makes such an act highly dishonorable on the part of a newspaper and proper and permissible on the part of an attorney? Is newspaper honor held too high, or is legal honor too low?  I believe the time will come when a lawyer's duties will be confined to seeing that murderers and highway robbers have a fair and just trial according to law, and when no amount of money Will be allowed to convert them into    paid   eulogists   of   dangerous men. � H When traveling on a railroad it is said that lying with the head toward the engine will sometimes remove a, headache. The President will visit Ycllowstontf'Park in August. Work is to be resumed on the Washington Monument soon. The army worm is attacking the tobacco crop of Pennsylvania. The hop crop of Ontario is suffering from tho ravages of a small green fly. M. DcLcsscps envs that tho Panama Canal will be finished by the end of 1888. Of rhc persons arrested by the Boston police last year about one In live were women. P. T. Barnum 1ms tendered to the church of the Redeemer, at Bridgeport, a complete set of stained glass window, at a cost of $1,009. Tito Massachusetts House ot Delegates passed a bill increasing the compensation of the members from $500 to $700. As was generally anticipated, Hanlan won n victory over Itoss Thursday at Ogdonsburg, N. V., making tho fastest four mile time on record. The liquor dealers of Jefferson City, Mo., have stepped to the front, shut up themselves and compelled every one else to shut up on Sundav. The IkkIv of Allen O'Brien of Bucksport, who dfcappchrud n-fetv days ago, was found floating one mile above Prospect shore Wednesday morning. A steamer, which has arrived at Lisbon from the Cou^o river, reports that Henry M. Stanley N in good health, but that live Belgian members of his party have died. ----- Jay Gould is enjoying his new steam yacht Ataiauta by cruising through the Sound in her. He was at Newport Saturday, and was anchored off the Pctptot House, at New London, Tuesdav. Bishop Knudsou of Apley, Unltah county, Utah, was arrested Wednesday, for placing dyuann'te under a bed and blowing up his two wives, seriously injuring them. He is charged with un attempt to murder. Eight boilers of the anthracite furnace of the Heading Pa. Iron Company exploded Tuesday forenoon, demolishing the engine, boiler house ami furnace. Prank Waltman was killed and four others fatally, and several other workmen slightly injured. The juniper worm has made its appearance in Piscataquis county, and is stripping every tree of its foliage. Many trees have died from the effects of the work done last year by these pests. Should these worms follow up their devastation, the entire growth of the juniper swamps of the county will be killed. A Union Temperance Camp-Meeting and basket festival will" he held at Maranocook, Saturday and Sunday, July 28th and 29th. A pleasing program of "speaking and music will be ?resented.   Among the  speakers are Gov. tohio, Hon. Nelson Dingley, Jr, Hon. J. H. Hrummond, Mrs. h. M.N. Stevens. The shooting for the Albert jewel was completed at Wimbledon Thursday. The prize was won by Wilson of the Ulster rifles, who scored G6. Dr. Scott, who was the only member of the American team who competed in this contest, scored C2. The shooting was at 1,000 yards.  Each man was allowed 15 shots. M. Bartholdi's Statue of Liberty is nearly finished. The head will soon bo placed upon the body. The statute will be set m the Park of Montsouris before it is sent to New York. Many persons have already visited the Interior of M. Bartholdi's colossal goddess, a novel kind of experience. The goddess's interior is roomy and almost as light as day. A Laredo, Texas despatch says that Dr. Campbell, the American consul at Monterey, arrived at Laredo the 15th, leaving the consulate in charge of Kev. Mr. Shavr. Despatches have been received addressed officially to consul Campbell notifying him that Monday night the American consul's oflice was entered by a mod of Mexicans and Rev. Mr. Shaw, the acting United States consul, attacked and beaten nearly to death. At Coldwater, Mich., AVcdnesday afternoon, while George Starr, Cashier of the National Bank, was counting a package of bills handed him by one of the confederates, the other slipped into the safe and stole a valuable-package---of jewelry belonging to II. C. Lewis, President of the bank. The thieves ran three blocks, jumped into a carriage which was in waiting and drove oil" at a breakneck speed, pursued by two officers. They were overtaken a mile from town, but on presenting four revolvers to the officers the latter beat a retreat. The English bark Erne, Capt. Douglass, arrived at Boston from Manila June 19th, having on board as ship's carpenter a Chinaman named Ah Chung. On his arrival, wishing to leave the vessel, he was paid and discharged. Tuesdav Capt. Douglass was arrested for smuggling a (Chinaman to this country.  He gave * bonds in $&"i00 to appear Thursday tor examination before the United States commissioner, the Chinaman being held as a witness. The captain denied all intention of violating the law. This is the fust arrest in this section under the new Chinese law. On Monday afternoon of last week, E. H. Car- u sou of East Rochester, N. H., rode on a bicycle from the summit of Mount Washington to the Glen House, accomplishing,the perilous journey upon an American Star bicycle, the peculiarity ol which is that the small wheel is in front of the large one. It would probably be impossible to make such n trip on any other bicycle, as the danger from "headers" going down such a steep incline would be too great. Mr. Carson performed his feat in one hour and fifty minutes. The average grade of the road over which he traveled is 12 feet in 100, and is : in some places 10 feet in 100. r The visiting committee of the Reform School, visited that institution July 10th and Opened the letter box as authorized by tho act of the lust legislature, which gives the boys the privilege of writing confidential letters" to tho committee, setting forth their grievances, if any. Tho committee opened 80 letters. Seventy-one of the writers expressed themselves satisfied, haying-no comploinU-to-makc.  Three, only,_ complained of not having a sufficient variety of food. Three of the letters were complaints against the treatment from the writers associates, and three were to the effect that punishment for offences had been too severe. Enthusiastic people say that one of the grandest and most beautiful views in the world is that from the top of Mt. Desert, to which a "railroad now runs. The railroad" looks to be, but Is not,, shaky, and a ride on it is declared to be "perfectly delightful," Mt. Desert expects that this new feature will largely swell the crowds this year. r General Order No. 9 from the headquarters of the Department G. A. U., designates August 16th as the date of the semi-annual encampment at Maranocook. One of the features of the day will be nn address by Senator Fryc, who has consented to bo present. The order announces a net gain of 1,199 members during the first and second quarters of the present department year, an
                            

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