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Independent Junior Newspaper Archive: June 16, 1883 - Page 1

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   Independent Junior (Newspaper) - June 16, 1883, Bath, Maine                                IY. SATURDAY, JUKE 16, 1883. NO, 27. A * - A1 1 The Gay DEUG STORE, Hallctt I Robinson, PROPRIETORS. A VERY FULL LINE OF Patent Medicines, Druggists' Sundries, Fancy Goods,   -Robinson's Perfumes, Toilet Articles, i. mm ma f -nA-posItlve-oure-foi'-N'ervous-ProBtraOonT- FINEST LINE IN THE CITY. Q-OOTDSI LOWEST PRICES I Physicians* Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. o z BATH, ME. THE SPECIAL BATES .      '" -GIVES TO- , : High School Graduates, Will cease on and after July 1888. A. HATCH. WANTED. GIRL capable of doing general housowork. Ennuiro at tho houso of H. W. SW ANTON. HACK AND LIVERY STABLE! MOST ELEGANT HACK in Ihe city for Weddings, Call! and general service. Also Stylish Teams, to let. C. W. DUNNING. [From tho Now York Times. By special requost.] Mr. Mark Twain Excited On Seeing the Name of Gapt. C. C. Duncan in Print. Amid-the-Verdiircrof His Hartford Home He Relates Some Facts in the Career of a Proud Father of Three Sons. Hartford, Conn., June 9.-With his strawberries and cream before him and his Now York Times in his hand, Mark Twain sat upon the portico of his hand-somo home this morning and made merry. Ho had chanced upon an item concerning an old acquaintance, Capt. C. C. Duncan, New York's Shipping Commissioner and the father of the three illustrious young men whose powers of absorbing the funds of the United States Government are, as far as is now known, illimitable. "Well, well, well"! So the old man's in hot water," says the author of "Roughing It" and "Tom Sawyer," with a mock expression of pity on his face, as he pushed asido his strawberries. Poor devil! I should think that after a while he'd conclude to put a little genius into bis rascality, and try to hoodwink the public as his little game of robbery goes on. It don't become a scoundrel to be an asa. The combination always makes a mix of things, and if Duncan will persist in his wicked ways somebody ought to �havc-a- guardian-appointed-- for him-a guardian with sense enough to throw a little gauze oyer the work of the gorge. He is still Shipping Commissioner, is he ? And his dear, noble boys surround him in his old age, supporting his steps, lightening his cares, and helping him to bankrupt the Government. Let us see, what does this item say: A bad man named Root, presuming on his position as a United States District Attorney, is making war on tic magnificent patriot. And Root don't like the way in which the funds of the Shipping Commission are disbursed. He thinks it isn't just the. thing for the gallant Duncan, after gobbling $5,000 for personal salary, to give a half-dollar or so to an errand-boy and then cut the surplus into three equal parts and to each of the scions of the house of. Duncan give an equal and exact third. A hard man to plewe-islthisJ]istrictAttorney^iQti_Hfi_| may bless his stars and fervently congratulate the Government that Capt. C. C. Duncan has not created a deficit, just to give his sons even money, say $3,650, instead of $3,648.30, a& is the case, "I see the Times says that just about $2,000 has been turned over to the Government's Treasury by Capt. C. C.Duncan during the 10 years he has been Shipping Commissioner. There must ue some mistake here. If a single penny in any year, or by any means, has fallen into tho Treasury, a doleful error has occurred. Old Duncan never intended it, and I'll wager this new white duck suit I put on this morning that when the old man read the Times this morning and saw that a little cash had glided out of his grip, he hurried, down town to cook up some job hy which he could make the hoggish Government hand that cash back again. "So he and his threo sons appropriated to themselves $15,944 90 of "tho Government's funds for the work they profess to have done last year. That's monstrous. There's no joke in that. It's scoundrelly, it's nauseating, bald, barefaced robbery; but it's Duncan, through and through. Why my boy, if I wanted to get rich rapidly the ono contract I'd most delight in making would be to hire 150 Duncan families by the year, and get just half of this $15,944.90 which Capt. C. C. and his noble offspring take, and, as I calculate it, my profits would be precisely tho whole amount tho Government gave me if I- hired them at their true value, for a Duncan of the C. C stripe is worthless absolutely. Multiply him by 150, or 150 times 150, it will make no difference. "Enough brains could not be found in a C. C. Duncan family to run the kitchen of a Sixth Ward restaurant respectably^ Brains never were there; brains could not be induced to enter there; it is the old story of water declining to climb up hill. As to the matter of honesty, that always was an absent quality with the old man. Where the honesty ought to have been in his make-up an inscrutable Providence provided a vacuum, walled in by hypocrisy and the meanest of meanness "It has been my honor to know the old man for a number of years-longer, much longer, than has boen to my profit perhaps. The honor fell to me away back in 1867, when I got my text for 'Innocents Abroad' in bis gorgeous scheme of an 'excursion to the Holy Land, Egypt, the' Crimea, Greece, and intermediate points of interest.' People who have read my tract will remember that I was one of the victims of that excursion. And thoy may remember, too, how I endeavored to immortalize the fair name of Duncan, though through reverence to truth I was obliged faithfully to note some things which a narrow-minded world chose to set not down to the glory and honor of the man who loft New' York Harbor a Captain, and developed within twenty-four hours into the ship's head waiter. Queor things happened on that excursion. I performed but my duty to the world anil coming generations when I narrated thoso happenings in words 61 soberness and truth. But Capt. C. C. Duncan felt aggrieved. For years ho kept his galled feelings pent up, but finally the time came when somebody advised him to enter the lecture field.   He was going to ex- Jilain all about the Holy Land as he saw it. le departed a little from his programme, and explained all about me as he did not see me. I smiled and said nothing for a time, and finally only wasted a little ink for a New York newspaper after long and urgent solicitation. "I don't think Capt. C. C. Duncan was any happier when I got through with him than ho was before I began.   I put on E- arado one or two of his little frauds that ad not been seen hitherto. I called attention to his advertisement that on his big excursion Henry AVard Beecher, Gen. Sherman, Maggie Mitchell and other celebrities were to be among the passengers; how none of them appeared; how none of them, I guess, had ever thought of making the trip. I followed up a few other of his thinly disguised frauds and exposed him pretty thoroughly as an old piece of animated flatulence. To excoriate the old rascal began to give me fun. I didn't lack for ammunition. What I did not have in stock came to hand readily. I discovered that the world was fairly jammed with folks who had dealt with C. C. and sadly regretted it. A reputable New York law firm supplied me with a big batch of indictments against, the hnmbug mariner. The papers and documents they gave to support their charges were absolutely convincing. There was a long list of offenses. For instance, it was shown that on Dec. 18,1867, Duncan filed a petition in bankruptcy, submitting his schedule of liabilities, amounting to $166,000, and that among these debts as sworn by himself, was one of $5,265.28 to J. G. Richardson, of Liverpool, England. This was the proceeds of a consignment of canvas sold by him on account of Richardson and retained by him. He was also obliged to show an item of $634.42 for money collected by Duncan for Hall, Cornish & Co., and not paid over to them. Of course, this was rank dishonesty. There were other equally questionable items in the schedule. But this was not all. "But, bah! it disgusts me to recite this fellow's manifold offenses. A half-dozen vears ago -I read in Thk~New York Times chronicling some of Duncan's wickedness, and what I wrote for publication then I reiterate now. I have known and observed Duncan for years, and I think I have reason for believing him wholly without principle, without moral sense, without honor of any kind. I think I am justified in believing that he is cruel enough and and heartless enough to rob any sailor or sailor's widow or orphan he can get his clutthes upon, and I know him to be coward enough.. I know him to be a canting hypocrite,filled , _to_the_chin-with_sham godliness-and-for^l ever oozing and dripping false piety and Eharasaical prayers. I know his word to c worthless. It is a shame and a disgrace to the civil service that such a man was permitted towork himself into an office of trust and responsibility. And I repeat today what I said then, that the act creating the 'Shipping Commission,' concocted by himself tor his own profit was simply and purely an act to create a pirate-a pirate that has flourished and still flourishes. "I tell you, my boy, Judas Iscariot rises into respectability, and the star route rogues are paragons compared with this same canting C. C. Duncan, Shipping Commissioner." And Mark Twain resumed his strawberries. Shipping Commissioner Duncan. Mark Twuin's Estimate of Him Endorsed by Bath Ship Owners. Mark Twain's statement that Charles C. Duncan, shipping commissioner at New York, is a man "without principle, without moral sense, without honor of any kind," and that he is "a canting hypocrite, filled to the chin with a sham godliness, and forever oozing and dripping with false piety and pharisaical prayers," is fully endorsed by the ship owners of this city and vicinity, and they believe that if the investigation into the management of his office is honest and thorough it will result in his dismissal, it nothing more serious. Last year when it was proposed to abolish the office the smooth tongued Duncan induced Bath ship owners to remonstrate. This they did, almost to a man. But today there is not one of them, not even excepting his brother-in-law, Mr. Davenport, that is ..not ashamed of it. Duncan has been dividing the proceeds of his office, amounting to about $23,000 a year, among members of his family, as salaries, alleged to have been earned by them. Without doubt the office has been made very profitable to the republican party as well as to the Duncan family. It is only one of thousands of sinecures which have been used to keep frauds and bummers in office in the interest of themselves and the re-publican party and at the expense of ship owners, and poor Jack. The prevailing sentiment as to Duncan seems to be voiced by a well known ship master of Standish, Me., who says:, 1'Duncan is probably as big a rascal as ever went unhung. HE RESCUED HER. Detroit Free Press. The other day a young man about twenty years of age, accompanied by a girl two or three years younger, reached the city by a Bay City train, and after looking around for a few hours returned to the depot and bought some sandwiches for lunch. The fellow -was heard bragging a good deal as to what he had done and oould do and cities he had visited, and by-and-by he walked up to the depot policeman and handed him four five-cent cigars and said: "That's my girl in there." "Yes." "She just thinks her eyes of me." "SoP" "I've never had a chanoe to show her how I'd die for her if necessary, and it seems to me we might put up a little job right here." "HowP" "Well, suppose me and her walks out to see the river. I leave her for a moment. Some chap comes along and begins to chin her. I rush back and knock him into the middle of next week. She'd want to marry me within a week. Girls of her age just dote on heroes, you knowP" "Yes, they do." "Well, you help me. Yon pick out some ""chap-�n.,ouoa_lrei,e-aHd-tair him what I'm up to and I won't mind standing treat for all hands. When I rush in on him he'd better run." Five minutes later the girl stood on the wharf alone. A follow big enough to pitch a barrel of flour over a freight oar approached in a careless way and observed: "Fine day, miss?" "Yes, sir." "Nice view of the Canada shore?" "Yes, indeed." "May J offer you some peppermint* loz-?" Just then the young man enme rushing down. When he came within ten feet of the pair he cried out: "Villain! take your leave or I'll toss ycu into the river!" "Oh, I guess not," carelessly replied the other. "Base scoundrel! I am hereto rescue this young girl from your clutches !" "Don't bust any buttons off, my young cub!" The young man made a dash. He had to or wilt. Ho rushed at the big chap with his arm upraised and heroism in bis eye, and the next" minute be was picked up and tossed over among a lot of green hides as carefully as if he had been glass. Then jhe big man raised his cap to the girl, smiled sweetly as he bowed and scraped his foot, and he was out of sight before the young man recovered sufficiently to call out: "Minnie, did I kill him?" "No, Henry." "Thank Heaven that I am not guilty of murder! Let him beware, however. Another time I may not be able to restrain myself!" DANGEROUS COMPANIONS. A SUMMER COTTAGE. Harriet Beecher SCotac. When a young fellow has made up his mind to walk on the edge of precipices, for the sake of seeing prospects, he always finds plenty of company.-There-are-abundanceLof-people-with strong heads who, having walked those parts till thoy are quite certain of their foothold, are ready to go out with giddy new beginners. If they accidentally lose~ their- heads- nnd-falhover, whose fault is that? Not theirs, of course. They never fall. They look -where they step and their heads do not turn. It is not drunkards and lhieve3 who are dangerous companions to the green boys just from the country-ob, dear, no! It is your respectable young men that have learned to sip discreetly atyfall sorts of forbidden fountains, and nibble here and thero carefully of the forbidden fruit. They are held up as patterns. They drink, but nro never drunk. They have exactly the knack of seeing nnd knowing all that there is to be seen and known in the ways of wickedness, nnd yet keeping even step with the righteous- Some of them are church members and Sunday school teachers; somo of them are shrewd, regular business men. They are never going to hurt themselves, they tell you, but they believe in a cert-tin freedom. They never could see the sense of temperance pledges; for their part, they don't need them; and if thero is anything they do abominate it's your radical, strait-laced people who keep in the dusty turnpike for fear of the precipice. -:-! - How Lee's Army Was Counted Lace and tulle bonnets are for toilets of the highest ceremony. . When Lee's army was passing through Chambersburg, Pa., in 1863, on the way to Gettysburg, Pa., Mr. Messersraiih, the cashier of the bank, took a station on the bank steps and undertook to ascertain tho number of rebels, tallying every hundred men on a slip of paper in his band. A rebel officer ordered him to desist under threat of being placed in arrest. Mr. Messersmith bowed and proceeded to his barn and. obtained 100 grains of corn, which he held in , bis right .hand, whioh was thrust into his pantaloons pocket. He again took, his stand on the steps of the bank, and for overy hundred men that passed he dropped a grain of corn When bis hand was empty he had numbered 10,000 men, and then he gathered the grains up again to repeat the enumeration. Thus he stood in the hot sun-and, indeed, tho weather was soorchlng at the time-counting until he had numbered the entire.host, amounting to 60,000 men. During the night he communicated to Governor Curtin the information he had thus obtained. And a Novel Manner in' Which it Can be Furnisned. The Boston Post in a recent issue says: Many people who hire or buy summer cottages are troubled about the furnishing that is Imperative for the season, but the trouble of removing heavy articles of furniture deters them from the comfort of complete furnishing.   Ono of the most comfortable and cheerful co�k�ges. .for.....summer can be furnished in a novel manner by arranging home-made articles of furnishing. The parlor has a painted floor, the center of which is covered by a Woodstock carpet, or fancy matting held to the floor surface by flit-headed gilt nails; chairs too old and unsightly for use are cushioned anil covered with chintz, divans made of square boxes are finished by large square pillows at the back, square hassooks made of soap boxes are covered with the same chintz. A three-sided catchall, mounted on canes, is a receptacle for fancy work. A pretty screen, made upon a clotheshorso frame, will divide the room space, and the windows can be screened by opaque curtains and draperies of cheese cloth or Madras. The dining-room has the same floor treatment; a sideboard made of a large packing box, fitted witli shelves nnd covered with delicate chintz in light tone, square boxes tilted beneath every window nnd draped, the windows surmounted by an oval shelf that supports the cheese cloth drapery, confined on either side by large bows of ribbon. The kitchen, fitted with its cooking table and the best of oil stoves, can be brightened by Japanese pa par draperies at the windows, fancy lace papor over the mantle, bright fans over tho wall space and pretty draperies, .duplicating those at the window, over. impromptu hanging shelves that, can be made of shallow boxes .arranged on hooks against the wall. In the sleeping rooms toilet tables and washstands can be made by using an empty barrel for the foundation with a cover of square board, which should be covered plainly with chintz over the top and furnished with a full, deep curtain of, chintz that reaches to the floor; draperies of cheese cloth above the toilet table at the windows should be held by bands of cretonne and ribbon. Packing boxes can be made into comfortable and pretty couches and ornamented fans converted into wall pockets, plaques, screens and toilet cases. Bedding and dishes will thus be all requiring transportation, as cheap cottage bedsteads can be bought for $4, and thus with a little work and very little money a pretty summer house is obtained which has all the essentials of health, cleanliness and comfort. A large Japanese umbrella placed before the door makes a good, quiet, shady spot for baby's nap, and striped awning shutters inside the piazza pane makes nn additional room for afternoon naps or five o'clock tea. Fifty dollars covers the cost of eight rooms, floor covering included, in this antique, (esthetic fashion.    A  TEMPERATE   LIFE. George Bancroft, the historian, is 83 years old, and ,_yet_ of clear intellect, sure memory, unflagging industry, hungry for new facts historical and scientific, nnd fond of .society and outdoor exercise as a man of half his nge. He rides frequently, and" sits his___ with only a student's stooping of the shoulders, and his white hair crowns a face full of animation and lit by quick and expressive eyes. At his desk at five or six in the morning, he has all the freshness of a youthful literateur and is devoid of the vanity common to youth and old age, of petting his own ideas and style. In revising the early volumes of his history he strikes out his theories of twenty years ago as readily as his superabundant diction, and replaces them with lately discovered faots in ethnology and chronology and with torse and direct language. His intellectual healthfnlne;s is due probably to constant and unhurried work, as his bodily vigor is attributable to regularity and temperance in eating, drinking and general living. He is a remarkable instance of long-preserved elasticity of all the faculties. WANTED HIS WALLET. Detroit Fret Press. He was from the East, and if he was not an exdetective he had at least a right to be called a philosopher. He was buzzing around the Third Street Depot the other day with a suspicious-looking young man, and making a great show of a fat wallet, and finally the special officer stepped up to him and said; "My friend, who is the young manP" "I think he's a pickpocket," was the prompt reply. "Where are you going?" "To Chicago, and he has just purchased his ticket for the same point." "If you think him a suspicious character why do you train in bis company?" "Simply to boat him." "How?" "He goes to Chicago because I am going. Ho means to pick my wallet between here and there. He had to scrape his pockets to buy the ticket. I have two wallets just alike. About half way to Chicago I shall let him get bold of the one stuffed with paper. He will leavo the train at the first station after. Ho will have no money, find no friends, and bo mad enough to bust when he sees my trick. I'm just cracking my sides over the Way his chin will drop when hi) opens the stolen wallet." About an hour after, when the train had departed, the oflicor was surprised' to see the joker still hanging around, and this time alone. "Then you didn't go to Chicago?" "Say," answered the man as he. came closer "that chap wasn't after my money, after all. lie simply wanted my watch, and I'll be hanged if he hasn't got it! Where's the chief of police?" MEXICAN-ENGLISH   RELATIONS. ' Boston Advertiser. Ii has been reported from Washington that tho American capitalists who are building railroads in Mexico do not look with a kindly .eye upon the effort of Mexico to enter again into diplomatic relations with England. We do not know what, basis there may be for this report; but, in so far as it relates to the Boston capitalists interested, it is entirely incorrect. Thoy have long regarded the nri--settled relations between the two countries as a matter which has unfavorably affected the development and prosperity of Mexico, and they have not only favored, but worked for just such a settlement as is proposed. The first direct steps which have been taken towards a readjustment of the relations of the two countries have been warmly welcomed by them as likely to prove advantageous to Mexico, and to affect favorably the large Americnn Interests wbleh ore so intimately connected with and dependent upon the prosperity of that country. Moro capital Is needed in Mexico for the development of its material resources and wealth; and with the satisfactory adjustment of its debt to England, and a resumption of diplomatic relations, there is no reason to doubt that English" capital would rapidly flow in, and largely increase tho trade and enterprise of the country. The benefits that would be likely to accrue to American iniercsts in Mexico from a settlement of English claims are easily understood. In the first place a satisfactory adjustment could hardly fail to be of great advantage to Mexico in every way, and everything that would tend to stimulate her trade, and develop her great resources would" naturally increase the business and prospective profit of the railroads, in which our capitalists are so largely interested. This of itself might be sufficient to justify not only the favor but the active support of the proposed .scheme by our capitalists. But there is still-another matter wlicrcin their private interests would be subserved.  It is well known THE   FASHIONS. Little Items of More Interest to Women Than Any One Else, Bronze and carnation piuk is a pretty combination. The Moliere plastron in various forms is much worn. Broad sash ribbons, with large fruit designs, looking as if hand-painted, are to be extensively worn. A new table cover is embroidered in a design of frogs in all nttitudes and at all angles skipping over it. The Chinese capote is the latest fancy in bonnets. It has a conical cap crown and cutaway brim, pointed and close at the top. � .    1 The newest window draperies are of black silk net, with border and center embroidered in elaborate designs with yellow silk. For the morning, cloth suits, embroidered with saiitache braids, are very rich. Batiste suits are also favored, and lawn and good ginghams will be worn. The satines and nun s veilings are made up very handsomely. The travelling cloak for young ladies' summer journeys is a cheviot New market, closely fitted from neck to foot, with checks of mingled eoru, garnet, brown and olive. There is a pointed hood with garnet silk lining. that, owing to the bad financial standing of Mexico in England, there has been no market either there or on the Continent for tho new :PJSB_|_Me3tlcaft-.railroad-seeuriliesr-^-Strong-efforts- have been mado to have them listed at tho London Stock Exchange, but up to this time no success has been met with. And not only that, but tho same influence which has prevented them from being listed there baskept them off from the exchanges in Scotland and on the Continent. Some time ago it was re--ported that a negotiation of 95,000,000 Mexican National bonds had been made with a London banker, who had anticipated no difficulty iu having them listed on tho Stock Exchange But he had reckoned without his host, and was left to dispose of them as best he might. An dibit to list Mexican Central, although backed by our best bankers, was also unsuccessful. There is no reason to doubt that this was entirely owing to the unsettled relations exhist-ing between Mexico Jind England, and there is good ground for the belief, with a satisfactory adjustment of those relations, that Mexican railway securities would be received with favor, not only in Great Britain but in other countries. This of Itself would haven very good effect; for tho depression in tho price of the securities is rather owing to the heavy load which our capitalists have been obliged to carry, than to any distrust as to the character of the investment by those interested. With tho opportunity t > divide the load th.-re wonld bo gcod reason to anticipate an appreciation in price, and a bettor and fairer judgment of the merits of tho great enterprises now under way. There has been some criticism as to the wisdom of the policy of Mexico in granting subsidies to railroads so freely; but although it has been exercised to such an extent as to become embarrassing, thero is as yet no ground for condemning it. For the new spirit of enterprise which has been awakened has borne good fruit in a material way. The Mexican Central Railway, for instance, has collected its subsidy from custom dues, and has taken a largo amount of money from the country in that way. But that has not been the moans of crippling Mexico's finances; for the amount she has received from customs, exclusive of the railroad subsidy has been larger than it was before tho railroads were building.- -The cash subsidy, promised to some of the railroads has not been promptly met for the obvious reason of a lack of funds in the Treasury. But this delay is largely owing to the unexpected rapidity with which the railroad building has been going on, payments coming due in much larger amounts, and with greater frequency than had been antic'pated when the grants were made. But thus far it appears to be only from a lack, of funds, and not from a lack of disposition to meet all obligations' The future of Mexico is in its own hands, and with the new spirit of enterprise which it has shown, and the rapid development of its business interests which has already tuken place, its prospects nover were brighter. Dr. Edward Mason of Portland has been an apothecary fifty years, and on Wednesday his friends appropriately celebrated that fact. The Whig says It is reported that Atwell & McLeod's drive of over two million logs on ths East Branch of Pleasant River Is hung up. 27 ?534 1979   

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