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Bath Independent Newspaper Archive: January 17, 1880 - Page 1

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Publication: Bath Independent

Location: Bath, Maine

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   Bath Independent (Newspaper) - January 17, 1880, Bath, Maine                                J     I 4 # t 1 J * 4 -A. Local, Btu9fn m Cor-k in answer to my look of inqnixy, ' I mado free to send it away for ye; it*B with ua ye'll be stopping now, plase God.'* . "It was true enough. My faithless Jehu having been paid in Advance by me had. been only too ready to depart, and, unless I chose to walk back to Itoewortfastown, wluok ^ inclined to do, I was to all intents and purposes a fixture. At first I was in* oliued to be annoyed, but the. exquisite naiveness of the whole proceeding amused me, and I was really flattered by the solicitude of my would-be host; so, altera few half remonstrance), I was induced to write a telegram for my baggage,; which Oormaok confided to a young imp who appeared to be doing, odd jobs about the place, bidding him ' run over to the poet-effiee and give it to Mister Moran himself and tell him its immediate." " I stayed some little time at the Cor-macks', seeing the country in company with my boBt, and foiming my ideas of Irish political economy as it js, and as it should be, which, being rather a hobby of mine, I won't now trouble yon with. There was a gentleman's family living in the neighborhood, which I soon made the acquaintance of, as in that out-of-the-way lpcality the arrival of a stranger was as great an event as that of a foreign potentate in London. Several afternoons I spent pleasantly at 'the big house/ playing lawn-tennis with the young ladies of the place, whom I found to be far more proficient in the art than their English sisters, probably from the* solitude. of their country life having obliged them to concentrate their energies on that particular form of amusement. One day that I had been spending in the above manner, and on which I had accepted a kind invitation to dinner en fymilie, I noticed that Mr.  M- seemed more absent than usual, and a trifle quick-tempered, as though he had been annoyed by something or somebody. When the ladies had left us, and we were sitting over the usual post-prandial bottle of wine, he took a letter from his pocket and showed it to hie. M That's the kind of thing we have to put up with here, Mr. Ellerslie," said he. ** You musu't go away with your ideas of the country too much couleur derote." " " That was in truth a strange production. It was written, or rather laboriously printed, on a sheet of coarse paper, headed by a rough but spirited, drawing of coffins and bell-mouthed blunderbusses. Below was the following composition, of which I mado a copy out of curiosity: M. M. DONT GO . TO . MOTE . OR .1. WIL . B. YOOR.rjET . IT* B . BIT . OB. WBONG . n-ET . P?T . HIGGINS. STyY . AT. OME." " I looked at my host for an explanation. " It is a threatening letter," said ho, "and not the first either that I have received. The printing is easy enough to read on the phonographic principle, with the caution that most of the A'a and I/s are upside down. The meaning is, that one of my tenants having, against my express orders, plpwe�\.up^a grass-field, I have given him notice to quit, and went into Moate yesterday to consult my attorney as to what compensation 1 was obliged to pay under the Irish Land Act. I got this the day before. I am not personally much afraid of the fellows, but it is very annoying ; and I am always on thorns lest ono of those letters should reach my wife; it would almost frighten her to death, I fancy." " You met with no interruption going into Moa*e, I suppose ?" siid L " No; but I took my precautions. I got a policeman on my car and drove in by a round-about routp. It isn't a pleasant way of doing things, is it ?" " I quite agreed with;Mr. M. that it was not, and expressed my surprise that the author of the letter could not be brought to justice. "You don't know the Irish, Mr. Ellerslie ; there is cot a soul here who would not swear black was white rather than be ibe meaus of convicting a neighbor. You know yourself how completely the police system failed over so daring an offence as the murder of Lord Leitrim. With such people as witnesses and jury, what is to be done? For my , own part I have no doabt that Mr. Pat j tn�y EO11!*? mio the 3?*?-HigginB himself wrote that letter, but bunting up any evidence would be hopeless." " A sudden thought struck me. I had seen that the last few words of tho document were lighter in color, as if they had been blotted. If so, would there not remain an impression on tho blotting paper? 1 "I don't know what evil spirit took possession of meat this juncture, unless-I own it with contrition-it were that of inordinate .self-conceits Should I be able to. get enough evidence to convict Pat Higgins myself. I shouid certainly .derive much credit for my Fa-gac&ty, "and have an excellent story for my friends in England on my return. With this end in view I said nothing of my happy thought, determined to work it out. my self. ','Next morning, having found out the locality of Hlggins'c cottage from Oormaok, I went to make -a call there* The sole occupant of the tenement when I arrived there was a wrinkled old woman sitting on a three-legged stool and smoking a black clay pipe. She looked at me suspiciously, but her native hospitality forbade her to refuse me a seat. For the first time I felt some qualms of conscience at t^e character of my errand, but these were speedily dissipated by the sight, in the corner of a large open hearth, of the very thing I was sceking,j apiece of dirty blottingrpaper, orum- ' pledjup into a ball  To be sure there was no telling how long the paper might have Jain there, still 1 felt a conviction �1     ' e lasFiiTtnc\^^a'irisimmam!^ tween an old sow and a dog j ust inside the door, which made the crone hobble out briskly to separate the combatants. She was not gqne long, but I had plenty of time during her absence to secrete the paper. As soon as I decently could afterward I took my leave. " ThemoraentT was out of sight of the door I opened my prize, aug found it to be what I hoped-a fairly good inverted copy of the threatening letter. Of course the last words were the most distinct, but bn the whole it was a very pretty piece of prima facie evidence against Mr. Pat Higgins. * I presented the paper to Mr. M-, who praised my sagacity and thanked me warmly for my exertions in his behalf. That same evening I made a deposition before a ma gistrate who lived near by,,and, much to his snrprise^ Higgins was arrested. j 1 Now I come to the unlucky portioh of my story.   How my share in foregoing proceeding got about I don|t know; but a day or two after thisjl found a great change in Oormaok's manner towards me.   Hitherto he had be^u hospitality itself ; now ho seemed ious to get me to leave his house, though he was as studiously polite iu hiding lis wishes as the most finished gentleman could have been.   Of course, however, I could not stay longer with a man was tired of me, and I signified to accordingly my intention of leaving h He appeared to me somewhat relieved by the news. " I dined at Mr. M.'s the night before my departure, after a farewell gamejof tennis with the ladies, and did not le the house till nearly dusk.   As I walking back tc Oormaok's I noti footsteps behind me, and looking ro saw that I was followed by a small 1 of men, all armed with sticks, wishing them to come up to me I quickened toy pace a little, -They, did tie same, and closed bn me sdmewhat.   [ ' * I had to pass a sharp turn on me road. -Just as I neared the hedge, apd for the moment lost sight of my followers, I saw a woman on the ottier side close to me. Leaning forward, she said, eagerly, * Ban for yer life, sir; it's you they're after/ Before I could reply she had sunk down behind the hedge again as my pursuers came in sight. " J hope, if ever there be any chance of holding my own, that I shall hot be found ready to run away; but when followed by a dozen men, with sticks, it's about the only thing that can be done, so I trust I may be pardbned for taking to my heels. *4 The men instantly followed at full speed, and for a time the pace was hot. But, having still my tennis-shoes on, and being naturally swift of foot, I soon distanced them ,,JiiA'--------- I'd put my own sweet childie to bleep in a silTer boat oi) the beautiful river, Where a pho-huuti whimper the while caaeadea und a alio lion lo the �nn'n flags shiver. Sleep, haby dear, ISlcep without fetir. Mother is here with you forever. t Sho hoolo! to the rise and faJl of mother'* bosom 'Us plccp has bound you. And O/my child, whut coaler nest for ronlsr rest could luv� have found you T a    ^ .Sleep, buby dear, . Sleep without fear,l Mother'6 two arms are clasped around you. WIT AM) WISDOM. e. there's no thanks duo to "I attempted ft few words of explanation aud gratitude, bat I coulees "2Wfe but to feeling decidedly 'email' as I rode, away, and inwardly took a vow never to interfere with other people's baeiness again. ; "I sent my late host a check afterward fc* what I considered a fair sum my forloJfihfa board and lodtfn**, Condition of the Crops. The December crop report oi the Department of Agriculture at "Washington states that � preliminary investigation points to an increase of 12 per cent in the area sown in winter wheat. There are general complaints of the ravages of the Heseian fly iu the early sown crops, and of the drought hindering germination in the late sown.   Yet the orop starts out on the whole under prospects considerably above the average, especially in the large winter wheat States. The total tobacco crop of  1879 is estimated at 384,059 659 pounds, valued at $21,545,591; in 1878 the product wag 395,516.7
                            

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