Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Middlesboro Daily News: Thursday, June 13, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Middlesboro Daily News (Newspaper) - June 13, 1974, Middlesboro, Kentucky                             VOL. 63 64 Home Daily of the MIDDLESBORO, KENTUCKY THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1974 10 CENTS City Tri-State NEWS At-A-Glance Nation World KY.-TENN.-VA. TENNESSEE SEN. HOWARD BAXER, ranking GOP senate Public Works Committee member, saya he is throwing his full support to a Mississippi senator's bill to provide million in federal funds for quickened com- pletion of the Natchez Trace Parkway. "This project should be completed as soon as possible, and this appears to be the best way to do Baker said Wednesday. THE RICHMOND, VA., CITY Council is debating whether it will ask the U. S. Supreme Court to settle once and for all the city's 1970 annexation of part of Chesterfield County. Mayor Thomas J. Bliley Jr. said Wednesday no decision had been made yet on any supreme court appeal. He also refused to state his own views on any appeal. THE KENTUCKY STATE DEMOCRATIC PARTY is holding a "kickoff" party Saturday night, for the U. S Senatorial campaign of Gov. Wendell Ford. The ticket event will be at the Capital Plaza in Frankfort with Ford scheduled to make a brief remark and introduce his campaign staff. ATTORNEYS FOR CONVICTED SLAYER Billy Joe Dixon say they have not decided whether to appeal the 15 year sentence given their client for the slaying of a wealthy Roanoke, Va., contractor last fall. Dixon, 47, of Roanoke, was convicted Wednesday by a Front Royal jury and sentenced to 15 years in the state penitentiary for the shooting death of Wiley Jackson, 76, last Oct. 16. Sentenced to Life Burch Guilty In Kidnapping SUNNY What's Goinfe On June 13, Band Parenls Meeting, p.m. Band Room of Middlesboro High School. June 13, Boone Trail Squares Class will meet in the Johnson Room of L.M.U., p.m. (Ky. June 14, Flag Day Service in the Lodge Room of the Middlesboro Hotel, 7 p.m. Public invited.1 June 15, Middlesboro Jayceltes Kiddies Day, 2 until 4 p.m. Mini-Park at Civic Center. Free hoi dogs, cokes and ice cream loall children under 12 years old. June 16, American Legion and Auxiliary llth District Meeling 2 p.m. in Ihc Auxiliary Building on Salisbury Avenue. June 17, Tri-Stale Saddle Club mecling, Kentucky Ulilities, 7 p.m. Elwood Combs in charge of program. June 17, Annual meeting Cumberland River District Mental Health-Mental Retardation Board, Inc., p.m. al Corbin Comprehensive Care Cenlcr. June 20, 1961 Class reunion meeting, p.m., Com- munity Room, Middlesboro Federal Savings and Loan Association, world June 23, Special Business meeting of VFW Post 10285, I.O.O.F. Lodge, p.m. All members urged lo allend. June24, Organizational meeting for TOPS Chapter (Take Off Pounis 7 p.m. (Tenn. lime) at Ihc home of Donna Arthur, Tenn. For more Information phone 869-3170. LONDON, Ky. A jury made up of six men and six women reached a guilty ver- dict here yesterday in the trial of William Brown Burch, 32, of Middlesboro who was charged in a federal warrant with kidnapping. The jury deliberated three hours after Judge Bernard D. Moynahan had taken almost an hour to give them their in- structions. A guilty verdict by federal statutes automatically carries with it a life sentence but Moynahan directed that Burch be taken in custody to the Federal Mental Facility at the federal prison in Springfield, Missouri. After the sentence was read by the court clerk, the judge told the jurors, "I think you have reached the proper verdict." He continued, saying, "Normally I wouldn't make a statement of that sort. but in view of the evidence that we have seen, it was the only one Mostly sunny and slightly warmer today. High 75 to 85. Fair and not quite no cool tonight. Lows 52 to 82. Partly cloudy and a little warmer Friday. Highs In the 80i. THE KENTUCKY COURT OK APPEALS Wednesday refused to grant a temporary injunction to keep the Owensboro City Commission from redefining the work schedule of its firemen to deny them overtime. The court said there were no grounds for the. injunction after representatives of the city said it would not use a waiver of rights defense in future suits filed by the firemen. NATION CHARLES M. KING, A MINISTER from Frankfort, Ky., Wednesday night was elected a second vice president of the Southern Baptist Convention to become the first Negro to hold a convention post in the denomination's 129-year history. King, 78, defeated Olan H. Runnels, pastor of SwopeParkBaptistChurch of Kansas City, Mo., in a runoff. He had been one of seven persons nominated for the post. POPE PAUL VI HAS APPROVED the celebration of the 41st Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia in 1976, John Cardinal Krol, archbishop of Philadelphia said Wednesday. Cardinal Krol made the announcement after receipt of a letter conveying the Pope's approval from James Cardinal Knox of Australia, president of the permanent committee on the eucharisdc congress. The international congress, a week-long event, has been held only once before in the United States In Chicago in 1926. WORLD FRANCE'S LABOR UNIONS REACTED angrily today to government plans to cool inflation with an austerity program of higher taxes, energy cutbacks and other belt- tightening measures. President Valery Giscard d'Estaing and Finance Minister Jean Pierre Fourcade Wednesday unveiled the new program, which is virtually assured of being approved in the French parliament. USSR PREMIER ALEXEI N. KOSYGIN said Wednesday the Soviet Union supports "total and complete disar- mament" as the best guarantee to world peace. In one of a series of speeches by Soviet chiefs proceeding the June 16 elections to the Supreme Soviet parliament, Kosygin said: "We are for thecontiimation and deepening of the lessening of international tension in order to make it irreversible, for total and complete disarmament, which is the best guarantee of peace." that could have been reached." Moynahan then told the defense counselor, Sen. Charles Upton of William- sburg, Ky. and Burch that the verdict "put the coyrt in something of a dilemma." The judge said that due to the history of the defendant having emotional problems and since shortly after being arrested he had undergone psychiatric observation for only a short period of time, he was going to give the family two options. One, the defendant would be held in custody of the U.S. Marshall and taken at the expense of the family to a hospital or he would be sent to Springfield. The defense made an at- tempt to have the defendant released until being taken to Springfield but was denied. Upton told the judge that he hadn't considered a guilty verdict and that he was in shock and had not consulted Continued on Page 11 Throngs Shout 'Long Live Nixon' Nixon Proving Popular Abroad Alumni Veep Betty Bell Mike. Cily. has been earned first vice president of the Eastern Kentucky Alumni Association. Mrs. Mike received a Master of Arts degree from Eastern in 1968, after receiving her U.S. degree from Lincoln Memorial University in 1962. Mrs. Mike is presently serving as librarian of the Yellow Creek School, and as Mayor pro-tern and Council member of the City of Middlesboro. By HELEN THOMAS UPI White House Reporter CAIRO (UPI) Tens of thousands of Egyptians, many rushing from the fields with children in hand, turned out today along President Nixon's train route to give him another rousing reception and thank him for his peacemaking efforts. "Long live shouted the crowds as the train carrying Nixon and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat on a Mideast-style whistle stop train tour to Alexandria pulled out of the Cairo station. Nixon, who had been on many such trips as a political campaigner in the United States, waved and smiled from the observation platform that he and his wife and Sadat occupied. Egyptians, who turned out at an estimated two million strong Judiciary Called Rumor Source Wednesday in what Nixon called the moat memorable reception of his life, lined the route the two-engine, .13-car train look to the Medlterrean. Also along the route were some of the policemen in helmetsandcarryingautomatic weapons that were recruited to provide security for the trip. Ran Alongside The mobs in Cairo jumped up and down to see over the other heads in the crowd and catch a glimpse of a U.S. president once a position of scorn in Egypt. Young children ran alongside it as it pulled from the station. Drivers honked their horns. The train pulled from Cairo but still the crowds did not stop. People working in the fields along the train route cheered and waved and ran forward as the presidents went rolling by. Mrs.HunYab Abdel-Moneim, 30, gathered together her five children from the field where they were planting corn and Kissinger Wins Senate Support Nixon will spend the day in Alexandria, holding a dinner in Sadat's honor tonight, before returning to Cairo Friday and a trip to the pyramids. He will depart Friday for the second stop on his five-nation Mideast "journey of peace" Arabia will go from there to Syria, Israel and Jordan. In the Israeli settlement of Shamir Arab guerrillas fought an hour and 40 minute gunbattle with Israeli troups today. The renewed guerrilla attack was sure to further Ughtenthesecuritysurrounding Nixon's trip. Observation Car But on the train heading to Alexandria everything was rosy. Nixon and Sadat laughed and chatted on the observation car. The Egyptian reception has brought nothing but awe from the Nixon party. Some of the comments: can think of no day that willstay more in our Nixon said in a toast at a lavish By STEVE GERSTEL WASHINGTON (UPI) Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who has threatened to quit unless he is cleared of allegations that he ordered wiretaps, has won strong, initial backing in the Senate. More than 40 senators, including- Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield, have signed a resolution calling Kissinger's "integrity and veracity" above reproach. Kissinger, touring in the Middle East with President Nixon, has remained silent since his emotion-charged news conferenceinSalzburg, Austria, Tuesday, when he threatened to resign unless he was cleared by "someresponsibleforum." But angry Republicanssharp- ly attacked the House Judiciary Committee, as the source of allegations that Kissinger or- dered wiretaps on 17 newsmen and government officials from 1969 through 1971. Leaked to Newspapers Kissinger denied under oath Sept. 7 that he initiated the wiretaps. He said he only provided the names of persons who had access to classified County Demo Meeting R e-Set The Democratic meeting scheduled for this Saturday at the Bell County Courthouse in Pineville has been postponed until June 29. The purpose of the meeting was to instruct Democrats on procedures for running for delegates to the local, state, and national Democratic conventions. The meeting will be held at the Courthouse at 10 a.m. on June 29. information that was leaked to newspapers. Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott, Sens. Barry M. Goldwatcr, R-Ariz., Edward Gurney, R-Fla., and Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., presidential counselor Dean Burch and Vice President Gerald R. Ford all denounced the leaks of FBI documents on the wiretap controversy to several newspa- pers and the use of them by the media. Goldwateraccused the Wash- ington Post of "an act of treason" for quoting secret FBI memos as contradicting Kissin- ger's account. He added that national security was the important issue not "nitpick- ing" over whether Kissinger shepherded them 200 yards to banquet held in his honor in trainside. Cairo Wednesday night. "I hope the Americans will overwhelmed by the be good to she said. reception. It's been the biggest In Alexandria, 130 miles ever in our Pat Nixon might have told a "falsehood" when testifying about his role in the wiretappings at his confirmationhearing. Burch blamed "back door, back biting" news leaks from the Judiciary Committee or its staff as the source of informa- tion against Kissinger. Ford accused "pro-impeachment" forces of leaking such informa- tion with Vulterior motives." Unequivocal Declaration Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, D- Minn., said an unequivocal declaration by President Nixon would clear up the matter for Kissinger. "I cannot imagine that anybody would initiate this on his.own and surely without presidential approval, and I cannot imagine J. Edgar Hoover taking orders from any Humphrey said. An attempt by Rep. Joseph Maraziti, R-N.J., to have the House Judiciary Committee hold an open hearing today to declare its confidence in Kissinger was ruled out of order by chairman Peter Rodino, R-N.J. The Senate resolution will be referred to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee which already has voted unanimously toreinvestigateKissinger'srole in wiretaps. No action on the resolution is expected before the conclusion of the investiga- tion. north of Cairo, Egyptians rode camels and donkeys into the city to swell the crowds along the traintracks. "It's a great thing that President Nixon is visiting said farmer Hiimi Ahmed as he swung down off his donkey in Alexandria. "We thank God we won the I October 1973) war which made this possible." told traveling companions before today'sdeparture. never seen anything like Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said today. Security measures were not evident during the Cairo visit where Nixon rode side-by-side in an open car with Sadat and thousands in the streets surged Continued on Page 11 Israeli Reception Cooler than Egypt Strip Mine Bill Passage Doubtful for This Year By UKKVV VON BERGEN WASHINGTON (UPI) chief house architect of strip mining control legislation acknowledged Wednesday that passage cf such a bill was in doubt unless a "public firestorm" of pressure was brought on congress. Rep. Morris K. Udall, D- Ariz., still smarting from a close defeat the day before of a nationwide land use measure, suggested President Nixon had dealt in impeachment politics on the land use bill, was backsliding on major national policies, and promising one thing in public speeches and doing the opposite behind closed doors. "Now (he president has begun to do the same kind of jig on the strip mining bill, and that one is now in Udall said. Strip mining legislation, which passed the senate overwhelmingly last October, was voted out of the house interior committee in May after extensive amendments and still must clear the house rules committee before floor consideration. "The Press and the public must not let Mr. Nixon get away anymore with this double game, for the stakes are too Udall said. The congressman called on Nixon to "come to his senses and do a little repenting." "If he will get aboard our effort once again, we can still win this battle for sensible strip mining and land use protec- Udall said. "But it's going to take a public firestorm to match the incredible pressure that was brought on the congress yesterday." Udall alluded to the western movement of the surface mining industry, citing Colorado as an example. "Well, before the 1930's there was another Colorado known as Appalachia with wooded Continued on I'age 8 By RICHARD C. GROSS TEL AVIV (UPI) Israel reacted cooly to President Nixon's lavish welcome in Egypt today, warning that closer Arab-American relations may strain the friendship between Jerusalem and Wa- shington. Israeli authorities, fearing a possible Arab guerrilla attack, also made clear that when Nixon visits the Jewish state Sunday his movements will be much more limited than during his current stay in Cairo. They canceled plans for Nixon to make a lour of the sacred monuments in old Jerusalem, territory Israel cap- lured from Jordan in the 1967 Middle East War. The President will make a stop at the Yad Vashem memorial to Ihc six million Jews killed by the Nazis in World War II. But such a visit is purely prolocol and similar V Apartment Building Named Honoring Couple's Service PtNEVILLE, Ky. The Rev. and Mrs. Herman D. Moore had a major campus building named in (heir honor when they retired from Ihe Clear Creek Baptist School here June I. The veteran couple was surprised during Ihc theological school's recent graduation exercises when n Inrge student apartment building was named "Moore Hall" in recognition of Ihcir 18 years service to the institution. A bronze plaque, affixed lo the apartment building is in- scribed: Mnnro Hall Niiniril In honor of Herman .Moore, Superintendent of Buildings and (Irnmuls Alia Moore. Secretary lo (he I'resldeiil, who gave IS years of dedicated Service in helping (rain ministerial sdulcnls at Clear Crepk Baptist School. The liev. M. Aldridge, president al Clear Creek, speaking warmly of the Moores said, "Bnlh Rev. and Mrs. Moore are adept in overseeing a multitude of details, they arc unusually efficient in Iheir respective jobs, Ihey are genuine Christians who arc dedicated to their lasks, and they always go beyond Ihc call of duty." Natives of Illinois, Rev. and Mrs. Moore were longlime residents of Cleveland, Ohio, where for 25 years Rev. Moore was a foreman on the New York Central Railroad. In 1950 the missionary- minded couple changed vocations lo begin mission work in Ihc Kenlucky moun- lains. They were staff mem- bers of the Dessie Scoll Childrcns Home, Pine Ridge, Ky., and the Magoffin Baptist Inslilute, Mountain Valley, Ky., before joining the Clear Creek Baptist School. Due to his unusually suc- cessful ministry as a pastor of four mountain mission chur- ches. Rev. Moore received the Progressive Farmer's "Rural Minister of the Year" award in 1956. He recently resigned a ten year pastorate at the First Baptist Church, Cumberland Gap, a posl he held simultaneous wilh his responsibility at Clear Creek. Rev. and Mrs. Moore, residents of Harrogate, Tenn., plan lo travel considerably, visiting their three children in Washington. Ohio, and Florida as Ihey begin retirement. Honored at Clear Creek The Rev. and Mrs. Herman D. Moore, Harrognlc, Tenn., were recently honored by Ihe Clenr Creek Bnptlsl School near Pineville by having a large student apartmenl building named "Moore Hall" In recognition (o Ihelr 18 yean of service to the school, to visiting the tomb of the unknown soldier in another country. Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, speaking at graduation exercises in Ihe town of Rehovoth as Nixon arrived in Cairo, warned that warming relations between the United States and the Arabs may strain the U.S.-Israeli friend- ship. "It is very possible that as a result of the American-Arab closing of ranks we shall also have to arrive al differences of opinion or a disparity in views between us and Ihe United Rabin said. He said he hoped that Washington, if il gives econom- ic aid lo Egypt and Syria, "will be sober-minded enough lo realize thai Ihe appeal (for aid) is an important one to use and Continued on Page 8 Suit Filed Against Rose's Ralph Vanover, Ihrough his next friend Lcvi Vanover, is suing Roses Stores, In- corporated for in damages he claims resulted from an incident involving the store employees. Vanover claims he had en- tered the department store to buy a cerlain object, picked the object up. anil wailed al the ndrih side of [he store for his brother lo mod him. While waiting, he claims, Roherl While, a store employee came up io him and told him to follriw him lo pay n fine and costs for shoplifting. He claims this startled him. so he left the package where he was standing inside Ihe slorc, and lefl Ihe store through Die Mall. He claims While ami another employee came after him, caught him. and beat him badly enough to require medical allention. The noxl day, IIP claims, the shoplifting charge against him was dismissed in [loll County .Juvenile Court. He is asking for in compensatory damages for medical services, pain anil suffering, ami humiliation and for in punitive damages.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication