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Middlesboro Daily News Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Middlesboro Daily News

Location: Middlesboro, Kentucky

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   Middlesboro Daily News (Newspaper) - October 24, 1950, Middlesboro, Kentucky                             WMIK The Voice of the Cunibcrliimli 56C On Your Dial See Program on Page 1) The Home Daily of the FAIR thra morning becoming partly cloudy this after- noon and fair tonight. Wednesday, fair and milder. VOL. 40. NO. 177. FULL UNITED PROM LEASED W1RB MIBDLESBORO, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1050. AdCB THL-EPHOTO N.'B.A. FEATURES PRICE FIVE CENTS TRUMAN CALLS FOR "FOOL PROOF" DISARMAMENT Chinese Anti-Aircraft Fire Across Manchuria Border 60 Year Old Woman Raped By Tazewell Negro Youth TAZEWELL, Tenn., Oct. A 1 G-y ear-old colored boy jailed here yesterday at 12 noon on a charge of rnplnij and attempting to murder a 60-year-old white wo- man, was held to Claiborne Crimi- nal Court without bond after an examining trial before Squire Joe Buis in Clai borne County Court today. 16, just recently nround 11 a.m. yesterday morning. MM. Wiley wat found beaten j and in a state of shock near the rock quarry at Tazewell shortly after laborers at the quarry heard the old lady screaming for help just before 1 1 a.m. yesterday. House at 10 Bobhy Kyle, released fr the Reform School near Nashville, confessed today he raped and beat a Mrs. Wiley of Tazewell (first name unavailable) In the morning, examining Mrs. Wiley trial said young Kyle had beaten and raped olored boy will be held her. The Claiborne County jail. No will be alolwed. He will be tried during the December term of Ciaiborne Criminal Court. Youthful Husband Shot Forcing Way Into In-Laws' Home A. youthful Middlesboro husband was shot in the neck with a .22 rifle last night after he had forced his way into the home of his in-laws and struck his mother-in-law in the eye with his fist. Marvin Byrd, 35, was arrested at a.m. last night and charged with assault and bat- M'BORO MAKES CHANGES TO LIVE WITHIN BODGET tery and house-breaking after he had forced his way into the home of his in-laws, Mr. and Mrs. Ward of ,'ioth and Exter and demanded to see his wife, who had vhere to -escape her bus- bund whom she said "always in-hip- ped her when he was drinking." Testimony in Police Court this morning revealed that Byrd forced his way into the Chumley house where Mr. and Mrs. Chinnlcy and their daughter, wife, had larcady gone to bed. Mrs. Chumley testified that she rooC from the bed and asked her son-in-law not to come into the house, but he forced his way in anyway, Mrs. Chumley said, "lie hit me in the eye with bio fist and knocked me Mrs. Chumley said. Mr. Chumley, who has been con- fined to his bed for a long time due to illness, got out of bed on seeing his wife struck and grabbed a .-2 rifle, aimed it as his son-in- law and fired striking- him in the side of the neck. The son-in-law grabbed the .22, look i'. outside and broke it to bits. Mrs. Chinnlcy testified. Treated at Middlesboro Hospital last night, Byrd's w o u n d was found to be superficial. Tic was given first aid and then taken to jail. Judge II. E. Ball today turned the case over to Bell Circuit Court after putting Byrd under a peace bond and a appear- ance bond. The father-in-him- was charged with assault and battery last night, but Judge Ball dismissed the charge this morning after hearing the evidence submitted in City Court-. Democrat Rally Scheduled Tonight At Pineville PINFA'ILLE, Ky., Oct. 2'I. A Democrat rally will bo held at tonight at the Conlinenla.1 Hotel in Pineville. Lawrence erby and Robert Humphreys will speak. Dinner will be served and all County Democrals and other interested persons are urged to attend. QUICKIES By Ken Reynolds News Photo by UNITED NATIONS joined in with Ihe world today observing United Nations Day by holding a parade on Cumberland Avenue. Pictured nhove (top) is the start of the parade beinj; led by a Middlesboro policeman, followed by flags. The lower picture is a part uf the large number of school children in the parade. Several Hundred Part In m Several City Employes Dropped From Payroll In keeping with the City's effort lo live within a newly prepared budget the following changes were made in the City personnel during last night's Commissioner's meet- ing at City Hail: Thousands of heads were bowed on Fountain Squaru at; The salary of Superintendent of I 12 o'clock noon today until p.m. when all Middles- Public Works E. V. .Williams was] boro thanks to God for our free nation and free way cut to per month. Patrolman; Qf iifej just jirior to the ringing of the Freedom Bell in Ber- President Addresses UN In Calling For World Disarmament FLUSHING, N. Y., Oct. President Truman to- day called for a world-wide disarmament pact to head off a third world war. But he warned that the United States and her western Allies will not be lulled into laying down their arms by "paper promises" disarmament. ''One-sided disarnrnmcnt is a sun; invitation to he said. President spoke before a special plenary session of lh'.; Uni- ted Nations General Assembly on the f i f t h anniversary of Ihe founding of tbe UN. With representatives of the .So- viet Union and the satellite Com- munist .sliilcs in his audience, Mr. Truman carefully avoided naming Ktissin as the cause of the world's war-jitters. I.Uit he left no donhl in the minds of life listeners that he regards international commu- nism as the chief threat to peace. The President accompanied his plea for disarmament with a bin-it. reminder thai, until it is achieved, Mie democracies have no choice but In continue rearming. "Disarmament h; the which the United States would prefer to be said, "Hut until an effective system of disarmament is .established the only course tbe peace-loving if peace and take the present John Dixon was cut off the Police Department. Patrolman E 1 m c r Sowders resigned from the Police Department. Fireman Hoyt Grubbs was eut off the Fire Department. Steve Smith was cut from the Street De- partment. Bcbe Green was dropped from the slaff of the City Clerk's office and Patrolman Dewcy Dillman was transferred from the Police Department lo the De- partment All changes in City personnel will take effect as of November 1. Ninth District To Elect Officers For GOP Lincoln Club BARBOURVILLE. Ky., Oct. 24 (Special) U. S. Representa- tive James S. Golden of Pineville will give the keynote address at the Ninth District Lincoln Republi- can Club to bc held at the City Hall in Corbin, Tuesday, October 24th at 8 p. m. Judge Charles Dawson, of Louisville, State GOP Senatorial nominee has also been invited to speak. Other notable Jin, Germany, in commemoration of the fifth birthday the United Nations. Immediately following Ihe ra- dio-carried tones of the giant Freedom Hell, every available bell in Middlesboro was rung for a period of five minutes. Every Civic club in Middlesboro joined in the United Nations Pa- rade bore that began at the Kirs I Baptist Church on Cumberland Avenue, wound it's way through City streets and back to Fountain where a IJO-miiuit.e pro- gram   palachia, Uig bloiie Gap and M ._ Samuc, Richards leaves just west of the last named Ark They said they were flying re- connaissance in Corsairs over man- extreme Northern Korea Thi Iravel second federal artery of would he U. K. 21 and would enter the counly at St. "cross the Yalu River frontier Paul, pass through Coehiirn, No-- (Continued on page 10) ton, Appalachia and across Pim; Mountain to Lynch, in liarlan County, Ky. The Norton Kiwanis ib discussed tbe project at its last meeting and President Fred Greear referred the matter ti Jay Litts, chairman of tbe roads committee. "be program opened with the! attended the cere- monies. It was United Nations Day, andj throughout the free world other Republicans will appear on t h led i Flag was made by Danny Haley, a' schools, churches, inili- cvcning program. k Grccn was: Pineville Boy Scout. Tbe United to pick up! Seek To Replace Reserves, Guardsmen With Draftees Ed P. of Albany, by Rev. F. N. Wolfe. Nations District President said today u.'Morgan, representing the i Hubart the purpose of this meclmg waslChambBr of Commerce, explained j Agent. ad-! min- to elect new officers for Ihe Lincoln Club for the and make plans for the Annual j flags were carried by fonrjut.es of silent prayer was Lincoin banquet next February. servicemen, representing the fonr.ed. Tbe ringing of the Freedom WASHINGTON, Oct. Defense Depart-1 Fi-iL- nre-cnted bv! the big chime started in wt in motion a broad new progarm for releas-: D-'ivi< Coumv F a r m! tbe one free spot behind the iron ]nS reluctant reservists and National Guardsmen eventually; i curtain. i 'dn" replacing them with young draftees or volunteers. CAR BREAK-INS AT NEW HIGH IN MIDDLESBORO Police Report Three More Autos Robbed Last Night Car break-ins within the City limits of Middlesboro reached u new high today as three more break-ins were reported to Mid- (the purpose of the meeting. At! VY. L. Lundy delivered tin next (jie call to colors was made. drc..- and afterwards three in Freedom Ucll scul a great! IX'fnso Secretary Gorge C. Marshall ordered the program dlesboro I'olice officers, "bong" vibrating across! into tiffed last night. Under it, the city into Ihe Soviet who were called to duly Polio Directors To Be in M'boro To Plan Campaign Howard C. Orr, executive direc- branches of the Armed Forces. Bell was broadcast to cl" The nudge of Allegienee to the. ceremony. the BARBOUHVILLK, Ky., Oct. 2'l- Former (iovernor Klcm D. Sampson gave a brief address at the United Nations Day tor of the Kentucky Chapter, Na-j program held in front of the Knox County Courthouse tioiml Foundation for Infantile The program was held p.m. wan brought here together with! involuntarily, will be freedom scrolls bearing tbe signa- provided I hey have been thor- oughly trained and draftee or volunteer replacements are avail- able. lie also ordered the a r m n d forces to set their (manpower (pioUis six monlhs in advance. This I lures of Americans. j Middlesboro Youth bv Car "Hand it over! The Daily New.. first last you read classified ads Paralysis', and John Middlcton, New York, regional director of the. Nalional Foundnlion for Infantile Paralysis, will bc in Middlesboro on October 20 for a meeting of March of Dimes workers from Southeastern Kentucky counties. Purpose of Ihe meeting Is to tayj plans for Hie, annual fund-raising c n m p n I g n from January 1 ii llirough January 31, The mceling is lo he held al the Cumberbiii'l Hotel ul 7 p. m. ncis, Jr., K yeVr-oldj will give reservists and guardsmen Francis of Middles- to be called to duty at least four Rev. Hugh Smith offered a prayer for world several hundred persons gathered; on the courthouse square In join Jolson Dies Clyde Fr of Clyd born, rushed to .Middlesboro! months' notice in addition leiice 'is Hospital for X-rays this morning j ;ill-day delay between receiving after he had walked into a their orders and reporting. to Ihe nalion in obFcrving UN day; Froil) Hcai't AU.UCl< and hear the ringing of the Frec- doni Bell. Knox counlians had been urged. SAX KNANCISCO, 'J I Al .lol-on, beloved by millions s ihe hlaekfaced singer of ley Minimi Ca.-li Kcgi.-ler Company! '''he new systems designed to Ill-nek driven by C. C. Sinnnond.< I protests lhal the armed ...........forces arc too hard on rcscrviMs and guardsmen most of whom have seen active loo f  erinusly injured sustain- only bruises uii the chin and easy on youngsters who never been in uniform. have to join in ranging bells of some! and "Sonncy died Siinmonds rushed the hoy lo the j Koine older men have complain- hcarl attack last nighl in a hospital immediately following the cd that employers have refused lo kind al the same lime as Ihe ring- j accident. charge made give then, jobs or promotion, be- ing of Ihe Freedom Dell in Merlin. (Continued on pago 10) again..! .Simmonds. cause of uncertainly ill Iheir status1. Marshall's order also told Laulis Long of the Yeary Apart- ments phoned, local police that the someone forced the trunk of his services to comb through their re-i car open last night and stole his serve rosters to eliminate those! spare tire and wheel, who, for physical, occupational Cecil Evans reported that j thieves broke into his car parked I on 21st .Slreel near Ihe Manring Marshall's orders carried onl "to. Theatre last nighl. and took his the letter" recommendations of a j spare lire and wheel from the special committee of the Defense Department's civilian components policy hoard according to its chair- man, Brig. (Ion. Mclvin J. Maas, a Marine Corps reserve who was re- called to head the committee. Maas, a former Republican Min- ne.-ota congressman, was not cer- tain how the individual services would call up their reservists in the future. Hul lie said he hopes a puinl syslcm can be eslablished whereby veterans get crcdil for their previous duly and would nol he recalled ahead no war service. trunk while he was inside Ihe show. Malt Golden reported thai his Hudson broke down on the Davisburg read near Middlesboro yesterday and before he could get lo town and back for help all four wheels, tries and lubes had been stolen from the vehicle. Two of the tires are six-ply and the other two arc 700-11) six ply. Middleaboro Police are seeking information concerning e Mil or llicfl. Anyone having any informa- if reservists with lion concerning either Ihcfl can phono vMlddlesboro Police at 66.   

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