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Lawrence Daily Kansas Tribune: Wednesday, August 23, 1882 - Page 1

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   Lawrence Daily Kansas Tribune (Newspaper) - August 23, 1882, Lawrence, Kansas                                VOLUME AUGUST NUMBER Al for thin paper should he acrom author nuinenwiarllyjor bntaxan evidence of good futtli on the pan of the m out or the lie nittdaiM to Jura tetten and Bizimn plain aVid iHnllnrt T niiiiipi are often dliHrailt to caiKlm manner In A MODERN OPERA ACT A lady very hich eopnno buried in the depth of wo Thedeejmrirowi her vocal The higher up her BeloTcd by an 8he cbng to him with faithful heart Her brother rcry heavy tears the pair The after Ringing aml to unknown Ihe lady provm tliat this her By ilattiue alinuet half a She f ells her trouble to her nervant A very faithful alto Who triUiout much An if Hlie felt ijuito under ACT A marriacn follown with another A of the second Her brother seals Uic fatal AIM come to a frightful Her lover bad a round tripHiokct went oil to afar bank too Jute toiitop it ihu woddmus duneand here wo are Tlwlady fninU tohravy Hie luver with themriiiga A tun itlt follows in lluuall the crowd toffctlivr The aftor limn a in her breast I ho lover mi m tiilikv And draua u liiuli t from IIIH Tillbrother the awkward Dm tiniilly In ah uti enurinoiis lonely and UIHHI tbolcad RopranoejClls Tlw loukini temjai on until the curtain ami WHITAKKKS IIKAF WhitiikerH wsis deaf in one It her right ninl it was stone Whitaker had acquired a habit sleeping upon her left with her deaf and this had often lieen a source of annoyance to her who was nervous and while she was i woman whose calmness and serenity of lisjMigitiim were with her deaf ear up AVhitukcr at night was rarely tlisturhed by noils which robbed her husband of liis The hum of the which maddened him heard liv A passing thunder storm which mused kim in a night and sent him flying ilout to close the window Would leave her in perfect imconsioiis ness df its The noise in the street and the rattling of the window windyniglitsfrequently filled with vexation as deprivel him of sleepjbnthis wilcsluin bercd sweetly on and heard flieiu it rarely happened thatshe heard tho crying of the until inditmiiit at its rofuwil to gi to would rouse her by shaking ind would ask her to try and sooth the little Whitakerhad often remonstrated with his wifeulxiut this habit of sleeping with hor deaf ear and she had often replied with u promise to try to reiuemlter break herself of it hut other it continued to cling to One night in winter time AVhit alcer sat uji in his libmry till u late hour reading a Ixiok in which he was very much His wife retired Whitaker closed his and after locking the front door went in the in accordance with his to see if the furnace lire had been fixed properly for the While he was poking it a gust of wind came through the screen of the cellar windows and shimmed the door leadinginto the back hallway through which he bud For a mo ment Whitaker did not think of the matter but suddenly he re membered that he had put a spring lock on the other side of that and the thought struck him licit the catch might possible le He ascended the stairs md tried tlie The catch was down and he had no He was Kicked in the for the key of the outcellar door he knew was in lie could hardly think what had lietter do about the but finally he concluded to try to make his wife hear him and come to his He seized the long and heavy furnace and inserting the crook of it above tlie bell wire that ran along the joist of the cellar ceiling he The bell jangled but it was iu the kiUrhcn and Whit aker was in the front room in the second Would she hear thewire twice then he sat down on the steps and There was no It then flashed upon the mind of the imprisoned man tluit Whita ker was probably sleeping with tlie deaf car This increased hisgrowing nnd he pulled the bellwire with the poker fifteen or twenty I could hear that a mile from here if I were as deaf as a post he exclaimed MS he threw the poker on floor and took his seat with the bell still But Whitaker did not hear the for no sound of her coming reached the ears of her impatient and indignant He grew angrier ever He felt a seme of It seemed un tor hia wife to be sleep ing away calmly upstairs whfle he was lockedflp ia the dismal recesses of the cellari Ill make her hear me or Ill break the poker and hooking it the Then he the wire with such furioas that he and the jangling of bell died away into It is litfle abort of said in a I have cpokea so often to Ellen about sleeping with her that it looks like fiendish malice when s He put his month to the broken fltte and called Then he stopped and listened He thought he could hear Ellen breathing softly in her but he was not He called agnin jijore and then puthis fingers in his mouth and can wake the baby any nflmr Kill UA Probably I and the baby will wake wtid but no response came down the The baby Kerned to be sleeping with almost supernatural and Whitaker had her deaf ear Whitaker was almost beside him self with A he who would treat her husband in such a manner as this is capable of hither Ellen will stop sleeping with her deaf ear or we will A third time he applied his lips to the tin pipe and bawled into it until he was He thought he heard his spouse walking across the but when he called again there was no The soul of Whitaker was filled with In hia anger he indulged in sardonic ffl she Bill rather relishes having me down in the cellar here all night it iaa good joke But let her take care She may laugh the other ride of her mouth before we lire done with tliia business And lie laughed a wild and bitter Poor sleeping sweetly up in jKrfect would have been deeply mined to learn how gravely her liuxliuud hud wronged Imust get out of here wimohow or Maid The win dow in but I ran crawl through I if I He unhooked the frame containing the wire screen which protected tlie window and pushed it Then procuring a wash tub ami climbing from jt to tlie window sill he thrust his lieiid out and dragged his body WRen be reached the front pavement his face wax covered with cobwebs und his clothes with coal dust but he exulted in the though I that lie was a free lie took liis deadlatch kev from bis IHicket and was about to try and open the front when lie remembered that he had locked the door and put u the chain There was no use trying to ring the The wire was and Whitaker wouldnt hear the bell if the wire hadnt been There was but one last hope of making her and that was by throwing gravel stones against the tried the The first handful pro duced no The sleeper did not bear Neither did sho hear the sec ond nor the nor the which was dashed against the glass with such violence that Whitaker cx pccted to it shivered to Whitaker was at his wits There was a faint light burning in the and as he looked up at it ami thought ntliis wife slumbering mi while he was in such great his wrath grew so tierce that he felt ca pable of doing something rcallv Hut what should he do The poor lady was us much lieyond his for the as if she had been in He thoiurht fora moment of trying to borrow it but where could he get a ladder in the middle of the night No as his sense of jiersonal injury he more and more resolved that he would punish Kllen somehow for her As he not obtain admission to his own house why should he not fly Why should he not go oftsomewhere and his wife something to worry in repayment for all the wrong she bud inflicted upon him liy against his earnest and repeated re in sleeping with her deaf ear up Whitaker turned passionately away from the house ami walked rapidly down the He hud no particular destination in his but he hurried along with a vague notion that he might perhaps go to a hotel when he felt In u few moments to the railroad depot not far from his dwell It was brilliantly and as he looked at it be remembered that a train started for New York at mid He walked into the waiting The minute hand on the huge marble clock indicated three or four minutes to Whitaker rushed up to the ticket office and bought a ticket for Now Then he hurried into the car and tooka lie had upon his head his so that IIM appearance did not excite Presently the train and Whitaker actually felt a kind of ma liciousjoy as he thought he would soon be far away from his It was a slow andhe had plenty of time to and as he thought his pas sion began to conviction began to press in upon him that he had been behaving very How absurd it was to blame poor Ellen be cause he bad locked himself in the cel lar lie pictured her lying side of the calm in the belief that he was till sitting in the This re called to his mind her deaf ear and her fondness for sleeping with it Then he had a revulsion or and he be gan to O16P6 lUlSitf MK UUVfKTU a more offtfce andashedflsoheeonclndedthatit wooU be a great act folly to all the way to New He askedthe conductor the name of the It was He made op bis mind to out tliere and to gpliome early in He think what did from home in a wretched leg think of himself Whit aker thought that if there was a colossal idiot on this he was that person iinv Bat this was a advanced toward bow much He reaDy feft alansed distressed his she He could not cellar all and he did notJike to batter down the door with the A happy wept to the f unulrtwd with tic help of hatchet from the fcindlingwooa pile he cut the tin flue which conveyed the heat Up to Whitakers Certainly be could compel her to hear him wife would be when she discovered his When lie stepped from the tram at Bristol rain falling one feeble light in front of die sta tion shone through the deep Wlutaker inquired of the man upon the platform the way tea and then he started to go to In descending the age Early in niorniiig he sent a tele grant to his urging her to come to him at and right speedily came a reply from heiy saying that she would take the train whicli ordinarly reached Bristol at nine from the window of his bed room in the hotel the invalid could seethe station and the and as he watched them Whilei he longed for the train to he tried to arrange in his for his an explanation of his con duct which would present it in the best pissible Senseless anger one ol the things that defies justifica a mans Very sense thai wifes love makes her capacity for for giveness almost illimitable only tends to deepen his shame when he is conscious oi having wronged heft Whitaker utter thinking the matter that the best thing to do would IKfrankly to confess his fault and to throw himself uptm lie heard the whistle which announced the approach of the nine oclock The train ciime in view und drew tip ut Hie Whitaker looked eagerly at the persons who got out of the Kllen was not mm mi She hud not lie fell bnck uptm the lioil with a sigh and Itegitn ugiiin U grow angry witli But the poor woumu was on the Alarmed by the discovery when she rose in the morning that Whitakvr wax not in the her alarm was increased when she received the telegram sent by What could Inthe explanation of the mystery of disappearance She wasKo agitated that she could hardly prepare for the But she reached the depot and got into the and begun to move toward what weary from too great nervous ex she placed her muff against the frame of the car window and rested her head upon while her veil covered her closed Unhappily she had arranged herself with her deaf ear so she did not hear the conductor when he shouted Bristol and she WHS alisdrbcd in thinking of Whitaker that she did not notice that tlie train had When he found that bin wife had not Whitaker made up his mind to go home at all A steamboat stopped at the wharf at halfpast on its way to the city and borne upon a litter he had himself carried on Tn an hour he was at the city wheiicea wagon carried hi into big He was shocked and disappointed to as certain from the servant that Whit aker had gone to see him in the train in which she saidshe would He could not comprehend why she had missed him and all day long he lay in bed worrying about her ami wondering why she did not Whitaker got back to Bristol about and ascertained by inquiry that her husband had with a broken There no train that could take until four and she spent the interval in in quiring about the accident to Whita ker and in trying vainly to ascertain the reason of his extraordinary About halfpast five oclock he heard her voice in the lower He listened eagerly to her quick footsteps upon the Then she flung the door Whitaker did not speak as she en tered the She uttered a little flew to the and put her arms about her husbands neck Whitaker felt that if he should have exact justice dealt him he would be aent to the had nearly smothered him with kisses she sat down liesidc and taking hold of his ham said And tell me what caused all this strange trouble you said it was your deaf ear How do yon mean with it And then Whitaker related the whole and as he did solus wife be gan to I am so I will promise you never to sleep with my deaf ear up again never responded Win you will do me a favor if you will iilwavs sleep with it up and stuff cotton in your other ear beside I havd behaved like a Then the who had been vainly pulling at the broken knocked upon thefront door and came in to ex amine fractured Our Wire Fences as Some observing genius has suggested that the lonelineva of home life on the Western where farmhouses are often miles may be alleviated by a general utilising of fence wires for telephonic in some sections of the country all the fences are of wire most of the plant for several private telephones is ia punnii of every only terminal fixtures an necessary to a free inter enange ofgossip between families that are too far apart neighborly calls iu bad The plan certainly has attractive If it were adopted the fanners when of the of home life that she can get iadoon except by lost hiafbotfc Jtte was very much hvtawfMBdtbat he conld not He called for and when the railroad a anywhere and pfcoitf boardlthey carried him to the hotel and sent fora If sitting in the had thought himself very foolish iT i nyi the children and pecking at her can drop into a itwkiag chair near the telephone and chat as with a distant neighbor as if she had never had a trouble in her Then she could give her husband a chance and let him swap horses e with the boys Aside Aom its BHCa a telephone would be a great for when in use by the gentler sex it would do what society roles have always been unequal would compel wo men to tflkjme erected by Phila derplfia for the Sminng very extensive The roof cannot hold itself up much and other parts of the pretentious structure are falling to the Orange of Fferidtk The concentration of all minds seems to be at present on orange and rery it appears to to the neglect of everything And here is another Heavy orange ciojjs tfd Coine rft In five or six as it has ibeen btit oreight or nine years are more frequent ly Treeslcan be forced with but the result is like that of the bet A slower growth more sure of a long and peririaiieht But orange trees must have their off or resting years as well as our Northern They cannot give an equally large aim steady crop year by Neither do orange trees gTott without tpeat They require as much nurs watching and tending as a To keep the soil open about to feed themwith not too much but just enoUgh fertiliting hind i to remove nil liclicti froni irllnb and to watch and fight all scct demand constant Hut it will jmy in the I have just walked throifgh n newlvbenring eight years that will nninges to the many of them There aro dome very old in the vicinity that carry ti the As the average prirn IK ixr thonsainl inch n tree With n grove ol slleli imarc ill this neighlior the owner will iiavc n qnilg iueoitii every liearing It i such n that has briinght on tin uninge The buyer of oranges picks ami shifts at his own cost and Here nnd ninl all over ulong the on prairies and in the orange liund reds or thousands in number an Withiti n radius of four mile where I write there aro 12 the orange business will evel overdone in Florida is a question for those Who are Home who can not get into it Iwlieve it These irroves being scattered singly or in itisu serious juestion how to get the croiw to for oranges are not a light crop that can easily be carried to market over the deep sandy roads of A box ol oranges weighs eighty pounds ten boxes are a good mule load a box 150 A neighborhood like calls for nn amount of transportation that something of an Hence Northern capitalists who have visited observing this state of are organising companies for river and lake for connecting canals and until within a period not far distant every valuable body of land in Florida will be accessible to already the whole State is mapped out in connecting rail roads and and these are lieiiig For writin at on Lake a beatitifui sheet of water six miles in and the headquarters of 200 miles of large navigation on the river Forty miles due south of this is Lake twelve miles in di This empties into Kjssimie a rapid which pass ing through three large runs into Lake a lake forty miles in These lakes and all navigable fora distance of 200 open on either valleys and plains from one to twenty miles in of the richest on which are droves of horses and Much of these lands are from forty to fifty feet above the level of their lakes other portions A company is organized to shorten dis tances by canals in one instance saving nine miles of navigation out of thus to drain the lower and by canal to communicate with the Indian Kiver and The which a great portion of the year are will thus be At the same time a railroad is under construction from the same directly cast to the Indian and west to the Gulf of All other portions of the State are being similarly while thousands of emigrants from the North ern States both in winter and sum penetrating in every by steamboats and by railroads and dirt seeking the best lands for the production of some of the crops that Florida can so well bring It is but six months since this railroad from Lake Monroe reached and now orange groves are springing up its whole A town has started up at and orange and sugar lands are token up every And so all over the I dont own a foot of land and never expect but it is plain enough there is but one and great are to be its Louto A Very Scarce A cowl story js told by numismatists reMiraing the big pennies of the year and was originated by the late who had a sly method of creating a market for his The tale was to the effect that some years ago a firm in conceived the idea that it would be a good thing to send the pennies they could get to Africa so a ship was loaded after the coin had been and i in due course of time it arrived in that verv warm Here the work of and the bright and shining coppers were traded off with the female nativer for oils and other merchantable The Africans bored holes in Che coins and used them for The result of this was that pennies were wry The story is generally be lieved by coin and as a result a flood penny of the year 1879 commands au the way from f to according to the degree of the has another version to give regarding the scarcity of this He said that the record of the Hint for the yean 179899 that over peonies were but that on accountof the methed of keeping the accounts it was impossi ble to tell just how many there were of Xhe cauw said lieiin the fact that the coins were imperfectly struck off The date of the bottom wemed to be very and it readily wow I hare had three or four thowand of pen and I believe I have many morewith the date completely obliter There are pennies of other years that are more difficult to obtain tw those of and if there were so manv of them in it would pay to send an agent there to hunt them and we would have had a inan there long Some time ago it was said that the of 1812 were commanding luise jiBd that only a few were in They caii be bad readily for the2 or four cents lie Atleabury and Its The River wbich winds through and Us affluent are made beautiful by the iiti Menws alowwhite ducks seen upon the All flie and at night are driven IVrtrniiyiiotjsed by their respective and well laid during the night are collected IJY the who have a number of large tietis of the Porking or Cochin Cliiuu breeds to sit Mptm Twelve or thirteen form a work of incubation is never performed by a ditekj but always by a This may and Imt ex perience lliw jifoved Unit ducks are lwl und verry Advantageously replaced by The eggsuf thorough bred Aylosluirys are sometimes of u ttViifilt untl sometimes of the juilc green kiiowu ill1 The color is no indication of piirity f limd or ditlerenee of sex iit the cmrn In the cul ir sooms to tin iiccitUii jit for sumo duek lins Iweh lo lay green whito eggs within it week M The nosts lot ihe liehs are prepared in litlU limn pers or in which liimtv wood iwlics have been is the nest olhtty or very i very that lliii lniis sluuild Ivc Hiul iiroktUd from rats ami other Tinidiioil of inctilmtion is twentyeight the lust week of tluit time must be tukon to sprinkle tlio Cggrt dully with lukewarm which ihe so the time the dickljni has not much didieulty in liglitiii its tvav This is an imitation of for In Uir wild state tbe iiarent btrl leaves htr nost early in the the grass is covered with and as siiti food her feathers become well nild do tho work which is performed nr tificialiy by the The tiny gol denhncd creatures are left with the hen until well liestled and thoroughly If intended for the they are not allowed to o near the nnd it for stock ducklings are kept very feil special The house of who is generally a peasant or bettor kind of farmworker trading on his own IR well worth His idea of comfort is limited to an ordinary beyond which he baa a little field for his fowls to run and access to the water for his stock His young birds are kept In or which must be protected troin and cutting or the young birds will die by As soon as they are big to take from tlie hen they are put in very pretty they It is no uncommon thing foV one man to rear four or five thousand bead in and I have seen as many as or together at one They arc kept very clean and fed at first on hardboiled chopped fine and mixed with boiled rice am bullocks liver cut up At the end of a fortnight they are fed on barley meal and tallow mixed with the water 5u which tallow greaves have pre viously been Now and then horseflesh is for it aectus that the ducklings require some animal substitute for the worms and grubs which the would obtain if leading a natural tht Year Meat To make the greatest quantity of the best meat for the feed consumed should be tlie effort of every intelligent and the animal which will do this licrt is the one for A firm but elastic and of medium indicates good well marked with A soft floating on bluhbery indicates inferior The unimafs that will turn out the greatest of lean meat in the primp with only a moderate amount of and only a moderate quantity of mid this nicely marbled through tlie and not those running to outside fat nor inside are those The loin and ribs are the choice parts then the next the then the and last the neck and head arc the inferior Observation should give the feeder a good indication of the value of the ani mal that the general thickness general fine ness of body and The spring of the the manner iu which fho rilw are brought close to the hip and breadth of the are the salient features in all animals that are to pro duce good The eye should be mild and Tlie head small but wide between the and with the horns harshhaired beast never pays for its and mossy hair never goes with such an The time has long since passed when tallow was sought in either a bullock or a Why The days of tallow candles are Hence it is the cheap est part of a There is yet too much of in the average AVhile it is the fact that the nicest discrimina tion is necessary to judge of the actual value of an animal by the eye and it is no less true that any fanner by careful discrimination and sooncome to be able to be measurably correct in his estimate of the animal he is buying or It will pay to so educate himself if he ex pects to succeed either as a breeder or r Atlanta woman eloped from her e wasobtamedof her fct two although detectivw were sent in all It happened thai tie wife had been cultivating a water and when she left she carried it with SA few daysr ago an who bad been employed in the in pawing a bouse in Atlanta saw a water lily in the When he entered house he was not greatly Ml rprised to discover that ite owner was the missing who had never been absent from While her husband wassearch ing else where for she remained quiet under his very Suggestions for Making War More Are not discoveries jicwsible whicU should radically alter all the conditions of and either render war im possible or give certain victory to those who dare iaee destructive machines Itis most The human nice has been studying the art of war for four thousand and has discovered ex except tlie fact that an explosive in a confined space will drive H missile a long They have learned j to throw Since i man has improved on the j discovery of lint has invented nothing absolutely For thirty years the most learned the Iiioct inventive the most scientific have devoted their minds to the with a kind of fury of eagerness prompted at once by the love of by and by the hope of to sonic of like Whit Sir and llerr hiivo been granlcd with a lavish and they have discovered They Imvo made bjggcr DIM lielter ami inoiv mid liuvii devised clever ways if keeping the tliellii 1ml tluit The way of killing soldiers is to lire 111 tlo bullets through a email Imrivl the of destroying U to lire litilleU through a big thin is New explosives have been dis Imt H new way of throwing thoin for the required If ever or nearly as in we suppose catapult might throw barrel of nitroglvccriin exploding would an nihilate tin1 enemys vessel lull the ey lierimeiit him never been A which approached HO close could ram and such a not being driven liy an could be kept off by it wire The only two Erections iu which even dreamers can see a probability of much change are the use of electricity or the tise of and of either the prospect very We can do a great deal with the but we cannot throw nor is it easy to conceive how it could m except through a Irqiihnrts dream of thequictsavaiit who fought tlie capitalistsarmy without weapons but was only u The capitalists had mastered the and the Proletariat rose in to die rather than be pillaged They had no viiviitalists owning all but as the army approached electricity shot from struck every particle of metal by the and the nrmy ly that of Sennacherib That is a mere It is just conceivable that some Edison might manage so sis to establish a wire connection with an iron lad the whole structure should be full of deathgiving in a huge wire charged by a J5ut it only as in the pim dream which has interested sonie alili if arranging mirrors as to concentrate intolerable heat that woultl pulvarise a at a considerable The thing could lie we so effectually the very ribs of an iron ship would dissolve into molten but not at any In balloons there is a lit and a very more It is always a possibility that immense electric force may Te concentrated in such a small space that u in the air by could be guided at will and if that were the con ditions of war of IK finally No cities could be defended against a machine showering dynamite armies might be destroyed iu u few and all fortresses must subterranean In battles would have to be fought in flu and the survivors would be accepted as irresistible Hut the more experienced a man of science the more he doubts the possibility of making an aerial machine independent of the or of using balloons in except as he would use steeples or other high points of The Market for the Sired SECRET lUebmb riMto wntf LAtKA Cxmbiar laigo N Aanday sl L in Nort in North i n ercnae 7 Ihe hall in Ante Ur on Henry X nMta at T in tba tali OB All Ox of Uw Eqnltobh Aid Bitut at All Birmhcn in iwd undiaUy inriWii to A gwod liUnty tortainBMUi every r PrtalJwt Cash Grocery House LARGEST STOCK FINEST GOODS At Bottom Corner fllBwarhiiMtti and reu Everybody made happy who deals tlie Cash ENDSLEY First door Nottn of WSJLCOX WDITE Hard man and Toning snd Proaaptly Attended Booka In Itvrga BOOK CAMPAIGN The market for the harvest gathered in the streets of New York is somewhat dull at us many of the producers nre out of renting by the and risking farm The demand is arid dealers a liveliei business in the The following arc the latest the price pui pound being given in cacli cuue Old rubber and 2 cents broken 12 cent hemp centa 4 cents ll to 1 34 cents 4 cents cento 12 ccntg old stove HTfl fflfflTaTn IflftA cent old and all old flHTliR AN1J 12 cent 1 cent old boots and 11 Tlie supply of tin is verv and the market is What w done with old tin a wholesale was It is cast into sath How is the market forold bones but Prices rather firm now at 80 cents a Bones is I cause beef is but I tell you they must come Slfin and knee bones of prime quality demand better but if beef dont come down theyll kill the marker by this Yankee You mean celluloid Youve got it Its just as good for buttons and knife What is the most popular article in your line of Soda water and beer are wortha cent Some times they up to two cents cham paign bottles bring They are sent bock to be filled Shipped to but on account of the strikes they dont get further nor What becomes of the old shoes Sent to the What mills Pepper thats they make fine if well The others go to the sole leather They are ground up and pressed into sole Big business while beef if Old straw is worth 65 cents a hundred weight hardware 90 cents news light print ma nila 12 mixed and allwool Careful junk deal en assort their wares ready for re make a good Some of them are very rich CREW Are In the Held with mere than Bpecial attention Ivan to AHD somimvK   

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