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Neosho Valley Register Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1870 - Page 1

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Publication: Neosho Valley Register

Location: Iola, Kansas

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   Neosho Valley Register (Newspaper) - September 10, 1870, Iola, Kansas                                l^ILTON:M. UEWIS. SOtRCB �&>� or tBXiMIBUC U>al �oticqi.-lS e��U a liat. I 4f bile he prMpert.e^d^' ^jfiilto, elidvAnt of�lglit MB,96. U a. r. * U^wili ant oo the 8M�d�7t fncMnf tbt'tall BOOK of awA B�t^ *ad �r�T two wfdu thwc-5?S^S&S.lnitajfe�fc i^wl^ to ^uad. JOBV TBAKCIs, w. M. C. OnxiBAS. Sccralarr. \ i. o.i). f. Or.A I-fls* So. n, li O. O. p., ImM tMr " ' .     JOHN UABBI8, r. �. !H. K. WwiM. V. O. m: M. WWM, ro� Aiuw cocjmr, IOLA. KANSAS. irons iiAWiis," TitiM(umtiwi. TiiiiP�WfornoDrwWenU Otfit-ar itair, oojirtfcom*, loU, Ki. 41. �MilMJBtteAlr. V>iar> Ikt h�m Ml    wbcn^ W MPif CMtIa to tbi ABBiijr.UrJMlUiicMM^        j Xkat^M|�ts���cl fotstUalBtMr Th* eUM lit! *aU with pterirr f7�. Aa tarti; witBiiUmi^T , ~ "IffhappiMtinoBeBUiMUualhtn',   " Wlttlla tboM ea>tl�t {a tha air.** WUU naa or woaaa, (irl �r bay, Boi'i tattad at tha aacnt iaj I That*! ia tht faliy cfcambm iaia 80 whtn'a tht hann, tell a* whtr*. Of boildioK "^tbi ia the ait"-t-ThU airr, tali7 oitMapian i That briop >neh (weet force'tfalaca f � 01IS.FBANC1S.(; ^ 0 wen r obtriiT uhi U; paid f�r aon MMi rutdtoti.  BiutheM entrn .drawn toioidrr. \ ' ITaxM enirn>t�i to Kim will b* |�anptlT attended to^ Hn ICB ia Coait B�oia, lola. J   C. MCBHAY, I ATrORNtir AT L W, Ofict oo,Ui[� wffft *ik]� of the public tqv^r* �aTRI#_At LAW � AMD 0(im(BSce&. buMt, Kaiuae.   Will practice'in all of 4be courti.of/the State,  ollectionf made, ti-; iM'exaBtoedlaad taxee |>aid,for|noB-r�id:iiU. r s!3 A sibooMAS. LAW, AITORNEYS AT "Will pnc^er' in all the CoattS of Bourbon, Allen, and .other coanliM. USce-leroad ttiirjr, Killer't Mock, Jliiu etreet, Ft. tfcott, KaBsar. btLLtUAN, PHYSlClAfl & S'jRGEtN X�>d-nhis |.>-iog and b�ir- J   ASHTOXACO., JJIPORTED WISES AMU LiQCORSj Old Bou.-brn. Byt, Mononaiheli, and recU-iiad ibiAr, f.B�J�i�ore .oTeM�. aaidfaA ^ 1* ii.*awWlh,'Ka.:^-    '  iMlaaare utiaet, nU-3B I.StAl'BEK, ;ascw!;ect;& Guilder FfauH alad ^pietieatTaiuTjniiard mc flattering rarmars as a clasK, or �a3-ii>g anytliinje| tfhieh implied that ihoy were rooro v(r> taoua, uprt|rb(, an(iclfi eopte, I am anre be muiit have misuiidoratood or thai he now mi�rofollejts mo. I do not oven join to the cant, wbtcb apeakcrii of farroors as supjiorting everyltddy else-of farming ns the! only indiiipensablo vocalionj Vbn mnr ray if you will that mankiad could noi Nubsint if there wore no tillers of the soil; but the saitiO iit true of nouse-buildors, and of some iotber classes. A thoroogbly good farmer is atikefal, raljable citnen : so is a good merchant, doctor, or laTiryor. It is not essential to the tme nobility and genuine worth of the farmer's calliog that aajr other l^hoDld be assailed or disparaged. Still, if one of my three sons bad been spared to attain manhood, I should bAve advised him to try to make himself a good farmer; and ibia witbont any rpmantic or poetic notions of AgiiciiUnre' as a pur-Btfit.' I. know weli^ ^rom personal tli'oagh yoatlifal experience, that tbo Gtrmer'a life ia one of labor, anxiety and care; tliai bait, and flood, and barricaae, and notimely frosts, oyer'which we cait exert noj control, will oflen dtotroy in an boor the netreaoltaof months of his persistetit, well directed toil; that disease will sometimes sweep away bis' animals, in tipite of tlie most jadicioas treatment, tbe most tb^ongbtfal providenoe, on his ptrt; and. that inseots, blight,and rust, will often blast bis trellrgronDdcd hope* of^A generooh hAnreet, when they eeem on the very point ofre alisatioD. I know Umt be is oeo-ea�arily expoMtl, more'than most other men, to the csprice^i and in clemencies of weather and olim^to; and that; if be begins respoftsible itfis without other tneacis tbao Ifaorc he, llnda io hia own clear head and strong arms, with those of bialielp-ftMW^ he ntost expect ,to straggle throngh years ofpeiverty, Irogality, and resofnte, porsbtent^ indastry, before,hi can i^aieonably hope to atudo k position bf indepeudence^ eomfprt and   ohaqt.' ttie \>roker, or theor out of bis righteous dues. The young doctor may be likewise incited to re. ort to aiqaackcry heirii]'. spiaes in order, to secure instant bread ; the unkiiown author is often impolied to write what wilt sellj rather than what the public ooght to hay, but thc/yourg/arni-er, acting as a farroeij, must realize that his success dcpo|id.t upon liis ab.�olnto Verity and integrity: lie deals directly with JJJatnre, which ncrcr was and never will be eheat-' ed. Ue has no tembtation to sow beach .sand for nla-drr, dockscdd lot! clover, or slo^ p to any tritrk cir ljuggle whatever. "Whatsoever a man sowcjth thab shall| lie also reap," while true, in the long'mn, f all moii, is instantly and palpably true as lo bim.'. When he, bav ing grown liis crop, shall attempt to sell it--in other words, when be ceases to boa farmer and bocoroos a * trader-he  may poB ttBRc^ III. The farmer's calling seems to me that most.conducive to thorough manliness of character. ITo-body expects him to cringe,! or smirk, oir curiy favor, in order to sell bis prodiioe^ No merchant rd fuses to buy ii bocatise his politics are detested or-his religious opinions heterodox. He may be a Hor-ii9a,'a^^l,a 4|lllBiit(^ 9(|Aqom muni8t,y.e'l his GAln drWl^ork. will sell for exactly it^ worth-nof a fracUon less or more than the priM eominanded by-the kindred product o^ like quk'lity and i^trin-flOfVttj^ of his/ijei^jbor,:irbD8e opioiotson all points are faultlessly orthodox anii^ popular. | On tbo other haod, the meycbant,^lh^ lawyer, the docter, espeoially iVyoung and still struggling dubiously for a to sacrifice or suppress theifpn^ roundest convictions in deference to Ih^^^Tebement and often irratiou al {^repossessions of tbi eoromnni' ty, whose favor .is to them :ibD breathjqf life; ''dbp will find that tkat.'moh'i go down hero." was the comment of an old woipan on UissiSsippl steamboat, wiian told that the plain, deaf straager, who seemed the focus of general Jn!ar> est, was Miss ilart bean, (ho cete-brstod Unitaiian  i iii so'saying she gave exi^ressi^ii I to a fteling which pervades,and gjovenis mftny if not bh)U cf^'pp'nitics.; I doubt whether"tbsi sooialJ^olerance of adyeiise opioaons is more vehement abywhsro e^e .than through t&tine would stop coming, whenever they should , have received what wo owed them; and it would in no caso stop till then. That a journalist was inrany sense a public teacber^that lie ncoeisa-rily had convicjions, and was not likely to suppress them, because they w^re not shared by others- in sbortf'that bi^ calling was other and higher tha^ tbatof awaiter at murdered obildren. Thb prisoner' was taken tojail. On Sunday afternoon an inquest was hold by Coroner Tomson, during a portion of which koqnig was present. i?nbIio opinion inclines to the beliefthat be is fully as guilty as his wife, and that his story may bo false, as far as it exonerates himself from erimeJ Large crowds of people worel round the soone oif the murder all day Sunday, and intense e^oite-ment prevailed. The bodies were removed for interment at the close of the inquest. a restaurant, iexpected to furnish whatever was'called for, so long as the pay was fbrtljco^iing-these ex-subsoribors;had evidcntljr not for one moment snspeoted. That such persons have little or no ca pacUr ^MvXi, is vory true; and yet, a man ui somewhat degraded in his own eslintation by learning that his vocation is held in such low esteem by others. The tme farmer ij proudly aw.-ire tbst it is ^uile otherwise with Ipa pursuit- that no one expects hitn to swallow any creed, support lany parly, or defer to any prejudice, as a condition precedent to the Kale of bis products. Hence, I feel that it is easier and inajre natural in his pursuit ih.nn in any other for a maa to work for a Hying, and aspire' to success and consideration, without sacrificing self-respect, comproo misipg integrity, or ceasing to bo essentially and thoroughly a gen tieman. ilUMT rioUUIOL,K. A Jnalher Drawna TCTa'Clilldrrn liwd Camnuia sulcide--'Xt>e FsitU-er AtlcisiVta Ilia l.ire. fFrom tbe Rock It'an'l Hninn.] Late on Saturday night the west end of Davenport was thrown into greotexcitement by thcieportof a terrible tragedy havitig been en acted on Second 8;treot, near tho corner of Warroo. Various .ro mors prevailed for a time, but in a little while the fact became known that two children, a boy of four and a girl of two, had been murdered by having their beads thrust 8u'cccflsivol3- in a |)ail of water, and that tbo parents jumped into a well a(t tbe back of their bouse,- tho mother drowning, tho father climbing out again by moans of tho Wind lass-rope. ! William Koanig, the sole survivor of this unhappy.family, came from Germany three or four rannibs a^. In his native land he made a profession of teaching-arriving be^e he found .no congenial labor, and at the time of tbe tragedy was redaeod nearly to the oxtieme of poverty, having no money whatever, and but little provisions which, however, included a sack .iifi .flonl*,^ sU0R:lng that Htarvatiun .coild^tabt be the motive for the ^�Hme.- Koeoig is about thirty.fivo years 0^age, quiet and intelligent in appearance; bis yvife was tWen-ty-fit;e years ol(I, and had not been for sometime In the enjoyment of igood bealtb. They occupied two Sifiall: rooms in an old tenement house miserably famished, a ragged, dirty fragment of a bed being tho family's �� only place of rtipoeo ' At half past ten o.'oloek Koonig was seen in a bntober shop in the vioinity, in an apparently sensible condition; about eleven o'clock ho aroused Mr. fiholie and one or two neighbors, informing them position, are continually .tomptedtfti�i'hl8 wife and children were dead. He      .greatly agiUled in manner and his plothea wero drip ping with water!.  Tbe neighbors went with bito to bis house, where tho'dead bodiei. of his wifb and children verified his words. Con stable Fiod at once took Koonig into custody, knd to the oltioer aiKl several olLpriiarties ho made i statement anbsUiitlally as fblloWs �.On arriving at home bis wife^ showed hin the dead bodies of tbo| ohildran and told him that'she badj drownc^ Che'm in a bdokot of water. He felt mucii grieved and terriiSed at her action, andj tbe two resolved to end their livpp. They radtti ally agreed- to drbwn themselves in the well near tbe back door, and proceeded to execute the dotomiin ation.  She jumped in and bo fol lowed. jagjaQwae, Hbitt evsbVe^ inches oif water on the bottom- sufficient for a determined will, such as his wife possessed, but not for that of her w ak andvacilating husband. So he crannied out, aided by tho rope, and alarmed the neighbors, after which he inquired wildly and repoatodly for � ihot gup to end his misery.. .The body of the unnatural moth or was reihoyed froW tbe well by the reopte assembled, andj placed ^enough troops to crush any Repub beside the inaninuuq foiims tjf her j lican or anU-Naporeonfe npriaihg becile or a blonacfer,'be is cnniiing and experienced AS -a negotiator, and, whes: desperailioa canto to his aid, he wodld'^playJir^Aiway Chat iliight at least givo bim a ehanoeof] saving himself ^rom totaljru^irDe would ^be able alio t to resort to more thali oiie expedrent>AgaiaBt internal as well as^ external-peril ^'f one-half his army wbro lost, be would still, id cssi he' retained control 'of tbe dtiior half, have msNiBsi;;i'si;�fl wnBt Next I XnoSirilwJit&tiHiiaar; IfsFhp^discmlinacd(ajrceptattlivi>�tia� -�stU aUaBaan0S^an- cc Boole is For nearly a mpnth now France has been an Empire witUout an Emperor. When Napoleon left Paris it was announced that the Empress Eugenie would act as Se-gent, and that he himself would take'command ilof the army. But she has shown herself to be aspow erloss and helpless in her nominal Regency as he has shown himself to bo imbecile and piffy as nominal commander of tbe army. She fig orod for a moment in a little theat rical spectacle at Chcbonrg before the sailors, after which she was seized with a panic, and her an-tiiority. as bead ' of the State has been ignored ever since that time. He figured for a moment in an odd theatrical piece oi) the bights of Saarbriick, after (wbicb be also seems to have been seized with a panic, for ho has made no pretense since that time of exorcising any authority as head of the army. In the mean time, tho governmental' control f of Paris-which now means "Franco" inore than ever- has fallen into tho hands of a Directory of Defense, whit-h yestcr^ day consisted of eight military ond civil iuneiionaries, but to which have now been addad four members of tbo Chambers. -This extraordinary ^body is possessed of supreme power in all matters of administration, and appareottly in all matters of public policy; lis decrees are, issued witbont the authorization of tbo Emperor, and without tbo signature of the lie-gent; it holds in its control the destinies of tho Empire. .It may be said that tbe dictatorship is in the hands of its head, Gen.Troobo, the newly-appointed Governor of Paris and Imperial Chiv^ofSUfT, who commands the army of the capital, who has issnod proclamations in bid own name^ who has enforced his will in regard to several important divic matters, acd who has promulgated ideas upon public questions in direct opposi-* lion to those of the Ejnpire. VV;e havefn.o doubt that if ^rochu finds himself embarrassed in any way by tbe rondtict of tbe other mem" bers |0f the Directory, he will promptly dispense' wiib thetf ..as-sisUnce, and practically ;domon-sttate-hid possession of. a power against which tbey, as well as the nominal Emprror and tbe nominal Begent, ,are Wholly hdpless. The nocesf ities of the situation and tbo piccodeuts of the Napoleon:a| dynasty, furnish him'excuse, if not ; justification, for this course. In the mean linie, tbe existence of this -pirectorr is proof of the virtual breaking down of the, Emr pire. Tbo ordinary machinery of the Government and Administration has failed in this crisis; and A rdiing power tbiat is practteally rerolntionary in its ti^turb is in pcissossion of all tl;e ant^prity .tbat is now left in France. We do-nipt believe, bowover,that the Directory is yet In condition tO:Uke ground against tbe �mper9r;.>nor do we believe tbat ho has yet liiet hope,j6f| resuming bis. pliioe Ion ^be FraniA throne, �        '\ : \,     ^     ,. Napoleon tbo third. wUl never give up bis throne till- be basjex hauttod every meani'of retaining it. He will saerifl.ce' tbe inte^U of Franco^ ^he name of tho Freooh army, and tho objects for which he declared warj'ho wHl sacHflce any thing and eyerytblag littber than bis own bold nfMOfn^jkOwer. If the Prussians 'iwfro at' thO; i^fes .oC{, Paris, and .the cause of. .l^noe wero loily^be'iroald still bAve:cards tbat he iiopldplsy in bir tmn b��-half. If, as A sdiEtBar,;he is an im- in Paris; and, sdoiceding chrdii temporariry in 'this, be would establish A reign of terror simitar to that by which ho SO; long govehied Prance. At all events, however these things mny turn Cut,it may be taken as certain-and it will not be barJjOf belief by those wbo know tbe character and career of| Louis Napoleon-^that he will not surrender bis tbrbne until every expedient of war and all the resources of diptprnacy and. negotiation have been exhaustedl Every Americari' JRepubjican and every enemy of Cie.sahsm'and des* pbtism tbroughoUj't tbe world will consider the war li.. fkilure, iq one respect at least, if Le succeed.: Wo trust, moreover, that the people of France will utterly destroy the Nspoleqnic dynasty.' Wo trust we shall not, in any case, see it; per-, petusted io tbe person of tusi son, or bis cousin, or any other meutber of the Bonaparte family. Tfais'Bo-napartes have been i cdrse to France and to the world irum first to last,;and qow is the opriortunity to destroy them, root and branch. I There Vtalkaboutthtr return of the Orleanists to tbe Preiich jtbrone. We cannot believe in the possibility of this. WetrustittrlH never be realized. What we desire to See eslal>tis|isd in Frdnee^at tho close .of this-war. iStho*�p�W�;.-iV. r. TTUnine\ nowtnoninc AP^ijaceCar ba tha irenink tniin (Wlr "f^ Sataaday) from Kaasdaaty td^ObieafowithOBt cbaaee, ... ----- otiefarAt- Maqty i 3S: U da 'mafcinc {iirect cuoaactiuat with iha td Daily Xbroa^h Uoek froa    I CHllCAdO to NE^ YORK Wi�ont chan^e.TiV'Utchlean OentiarAeiea Weiieia. Lake Shore A Michigan Bouth-em. tntt�i>i�>ii, Fort Wayne A CU-caco lUilwajrs and Eastern Coo-nections, ei'Ias-pasieoeeni a choi<;e,  {OlalhrtI if &> IMIawa...:2'IS Jo PilDceton.^4I do Klcbmood.ZbS do ' ABBITK AT aaraett....SU M BInaic 1st P^b1ie.8 �dtb. This subject is beginning to be more diBCUsicd, vnd ao dOnbt mn-> sic has daims'to a larger place atnong Bchnol Studies, than' it has bitbertb occupied. "The able address of Daniel: >B. Hagar, delivered before the Uusi^'al Convention at the Boston Musib Ball, a few months since, bss already excited a powerful influencb in this dii;i>b-tion, and inquiries are being mad" with regard to the best method of| adopting tho reforms whion have been suggested. Without a doubt music is tho art which n mast fostered ampog us. and parlors are not considered fully furnished that lack a piano. ' We are not only a mnsic^loving people,. but we are destined eventually to become a great musical na,i!on. It is necessary, therAforo, that' we devise some means of educating, to this end, tlie rising goneiration. In Ger-; many, no one can be asobobl teaob er who has not a thoiougb knowl edge of music, and that divirte art is taught, OS here, in common school. We hope that it may soon be mnre goneraK/ taught ompng us; for its iofuence on physical developi/ment nicne is one of the utmost importance l>y tending to keep the lungs and vocal oi^ans in a sound and TigG|rou8 bondttion. It is, however, iii its moral power, that its espeoia oxootlenise. lies, and this is oyide it to ail Who know its mvstoriotm iftflneoco en the mind and heart. Inhere is no better way of conkbining moral culture with intellectual attainnicnt,.tban by incorporating musib a? a.brancb of common school cdncAti:nv^ [Journal ff Education., ; 0arnett....4Mp.n.. � J* V""-� *� P" RicbMoad..S 01 do   lies do    >U do WhStJii.SM do   ll�-do   1�M d. IOlt�wa.lS� *>    ........   ,f.�S\:"' \uKO 4-M do........   IJSSp."- w*s.-rr;.��-  sod Soathera dtlei. Fat-sender* are now landed iii: St. Louis, St th'> foot of BlddI�':�lt*et;eaaVf>tent to boteU. tbe botinest Center of the city.- and traneters lo eai^n|Mtiqn! lii sqli-i tade, in Kinisbroent, the hope re^ turned, add tbe etperlment is ea�f brly tried. The saporBAl powers ^m to take his part. What was pn his lips to say is uttered by his iTrioud. .When I>o went abroad, he met by W.oaderful casnalilies. the bnehe sought^ If in his wslkhe; clnimedto look back,-his friend-was walkiBg behind!him.;/ Audit hasbapponcd tbat'the. artist has often:drawn in his'pietnlrea the face.of the fiftnre wife Wboialte has not yet 8�eii.-'i^ni�r�m. WAtCHXilOCK REPAIRER ^jfbDenliiitola 0l�, Allen GotintytJCaBsas, bpreparediodo all kinds of Watch A Oocit repairlnic,;*!* ibort notice; Also, Dent-ittiy, in .nH It4;branehe id�d ta at all bootti 01Bee,"6tertb�Post0flet.  Ci^RLYLE Ik Which iiai' 1>�n ii VneeiwiTBi o^ti* for fiitr yeai* wiltioasMntBcn t|alii on tta m day of eie�te*lrf,.lo conUnae IS montht; 'fmMiSidalal^drdtditt all �lfrta-Wtl�*a>^�ft!?>-^>�M.Sch�.lt. Ei>anliBK, Kv&UUiywiiim^ at Wr. lOlwrdpTtrt it BOW XV-.BiajtAtty near OBrlylt ,lraw niletnorth �( loto forth* ^_   ptBcticaarUaffOftMlofli: Ti^eili KxtriBot�( *sl  . ntelll�p.ln. �ten;ml .* .....I f� d� sn da.  SOS dtf *4� di>.- S3�r do IteS- dd     S4T do K1& do     S� d� MSI d*    tli da     r S30 p. n�. S3S do -   MIS dn use do   -SOOa. as. 12 10 a. at.  8 4� d .> TArcom'n.) CFreiehl) ViolaBd....S4� do .Sibley.....*ii do . AKRIVB AT Uwt�|w*..T.li  4S do 9 3a dB SIS do 8 3S da T05 do t'45 do �Mtd.; 0PE2f TO 487 MJIte West of tha KIitoBti Birar.' NttiUimer Arr*9S�in�ni. XIn and attar XAY 29llit 1970, iialu will ran atlollowtt doln�W�at. Lfita.      tXTKOM.   watt. Wyandotte....5 05aB  SSJaiftt W. Kansas CilyO �0 do   9 50 da Stete Line....8 10 do   * 95 da L�atenttorth..5 00 do   8 30 do Stranger.....    IS da It 30 do r��rene�,.. SlOdo ilSSdo , PenTTilla.... 8 48 do 1142pnl Topekai...... �40 do   I 37 dO ft.J4ant.....leSOd*   340 do' Wabieto......it 30 do   3 38 do HaaliatUn...It3iaB 433 do Jooc5onaty. 138 do  ~ ^-Abilenl;...... 2 43da SoIoaoS.....3 18 db Salina.1...... 3 30 da Brookrilta ... 4 35 do FottUaifccr... 5 4S do Ell.!wo�lh.;..i 8T8 dd Uajt atf.... 9 18 p a Sheridan .'f... 6 68 do ABairaiAt.  �       ,   ' Caitopi.....;.. t3� do   ....... ^ otiiao*tB>ihMtttCT l�aa- "5t Jnodioa'ci^ wilSie.       AT. B W. ^tMtOUfkmh^ rSoMbttn: Orsriaad Jfail A 9lSuiiftAtAui FortIJBiat^ BaBtaFe, aod all foiato fa Haw Mealeo aad Aite>v*- AtOiSB:isilk Hacfeta' OearlaadKitta. CdtaviHtfeea eaaohcaior Oawrpr^Oasitral OaafSrtotnJSTnHolt Ib dilondo. �St: c . i�ililIs*iM*
                            

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