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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - November 4, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                ......m^^n^w^^^ HUTCHINSON DAILY NKWS: TOESDAY MORNING NOVEMBfik 4; 1890. NEW  YORK   FASHIONS. Wfclw�ft)a*l *oYeltta* noctrntty KttiltitteA *T Ootham** Importer*. It IK woV ft "two-hooVed," but a low-heeled riconillUy shoo that is now in (grant favor. A Mtcsd and nxporlanocd prophet and imporWr hasBljjhtud a woll-di.'-ilncd, un-mLstaknVta "hoopsklrt" on   I anion's horizon.   Th" soar of this wire cafffl do- I �Ur�sHfcoho not very fur in the- din-1 t&nco. ami soon bo reached-!..� Mode 1 Mlllng straight in 1U direction-and In �i�w of this, said Importer has aclusHv sent 1� an advance flnit order for an �in-11 mi ted supply of those detestable articled ol Very many of tho now clofu costumes �na cieak drosses nra inad'i more com-Zortahla and far lift titer in weight by AmltUaf* tho usual foundation skirt. X4o�* �f tlir> prlncosjso gi>w))H have bpo-ond skirts, but with thorn aru always worn abnath petticoats of surah silk m&Uhlag thc color ot t^ft Atpw. Thoso aro devoir pored and finished with ft ruche, or triple frills thataro ninun very narrow and placod at thu vorv i^xircinn dpd of tbo limn. Am mi: iho winter drc^i wraps is a I'lngat modal formed of dahlia-colored poau do �oie, with shouldor-cnpos of dark daUlla volvot Unod with silk of the itftfoo Hh.idn as tho body. Those capes *ro covorod with >� iiiipurh not-work �f nilk nnd chonilln paKtfomniitorio, with facet**! stones bora itml thorn In wine* t�fiu7_ itpul i\nd jnt. Thn wrap bus aillt-ilnuu paneled fronts bordered at tho font with tho rich (f litt�riiijf garnitaro. Now dctitii-piiloniiitjOM with a 1'Vcnoh aouont have vory cloMi-tKtinj? culrasao f roots, cuvbphI with iimf*�iiflc�n1. passo-inoiitorltta in -tpocuil dusijj'Ti. Most of those battmi dtug-onally. and ar� completed by square-shaped I-hjuIs XIV. bip pocVftl*. wirb am overlaid ivitb UioallU and eboni]li* ^'Jtnii turns. l,n*s olabnrato Fronnfe pohjuufsfs of fine ladies'cloth or cfcnifil's hair, ovorakirl-** of ntripod bonffallut:, an* bordorttd with fpsilhur or narrow fur bunds. Thesu polunnisos outlimo tho long waist severely, with all tho fullnnsHut tbo bark, vory slight p&uifir drapBrioa relieving tbo aides. BandfcntJiu fOng'lish-iD.'idr tfuwni ot Venetian wool, combined with vt;lvot-atrlped artnuro ailk, ftooltod with gold, aro made with domitriiincd princpwso bark*]mml jackot-front.s of tho Venetian wool, with only fill^btly full sIoovoh, plainly jrorod skirt frotiU, :uid Dorothy fOftt-s i�t Uio striped silk, with volvot folds boyond. Kn^Hsti cherry and rus Mi, wlno ^nd doo color, I'jnguoUo hluo and apricot, admiral bluo and beipo, form vory otroi:ti vo com blunt ions in tho ntripod robricv, tho doflp-oulocrtd band flockod 01 dottod with gold or hroruo. ,   N. V   PottL PULLMAN'S   NOBLEMEN. �-tlefir cf Ilow Tliay  Markcfl   th�   Vtr ^implr.i !a Trnrt'l "Do yon know," said a business man, **that  1   liwl  un  o.xpurif.-nco  rocontly whitib wm (ml. ;it nil compliniunury to my vuuityV   1 started from Hnu Fran-olscft to Now Vork, and on tht> day aftor my Ural mi*tit. oo^thn aloopini: car 1 no liced tliui  noichoM bad betsu cut in the heels of  built  my shoes.   I  supposed that tbo porter iiad done this loidontify my nhue*, and wan diapo^nd to forgot thft wbniw -ailAlr.    \ not\CL�d, however, that ttto portui was assiduous in his at* tentiotis Ui        ultbou^b  tboro watt alight, almost imparcopllhle, touch %t dycr;UlUy wj mo in bU wannor,   Ho was a.  ftood   portor, bowuvBi% and when oban^od i�y ffloopinjf our J tlpptiU bira iiberftUy.   Aftor my first night on my second car 1 rouioroborud tho nolcbon, and tookinj: on  my boot hnols found a cro�j on tfaoh.   1 dpcidod  Lb at this was a nolloe to portors that f was 'a liberal 'tlppor.   HUH I noticed thp samo con-oeale4 di&liko of  tbo portor mid his ear neat desfro to plPttsv i.ko.   I found Ilia notvicfi oxcoloni. howovur. t  "When I took my noxt aloepor at Chicago 1 aiot thoro a portor with whom I bad traveled bo fore and who know who J. was* Whllo Uq was hcu.alu.tig mcdowu the next morning- bo kept chuckling to himself.   'What ticklon you so much. 8acar I finally mtkod. Ko only chucklod and yrlnnud tho  harder.   At last bo aald, choking with laughter:   "Duy'a *look yoo  for  a spot tor,  sub.'  That meant nothing- to mo,  but Ham ox-plalnnd that tho Qr*t portor bad iu.;^< lnod I w.i* a ftpy.   Ho found out that. I was* R'�i"K' to Now York, of courso, and not knowing bow far njy wickodncss tended, warned all portcrft whom I.shoiild meet.  Th� cross was substUnifd wiiore the a\f*nn r.liuni;od.   Thuro's usprit do corps f�r you.   1 sbould nut wear those a hues \t 1 were to start on anoihur railroad  )aurnoy  to-morrow.-N.   Y. Tri- An K*p�irt Iba. Kydd (suspioiuusly) -Jobu, you M'rae t�ld ine you wore a widower! JCydd (aatonfabed) -Why, bless aae, I ain't) Uasv Kjdd-Hut you know just how to hold Ihe baby. Mr. Kydd-Maria, you have forgot ton tbai iaw�* wore fourteov children In my family, aad that ws It rod la airy. -Puck. Xcrty-twoyoara ot unoro*tm 8�r*io� m� ttohODlmistriW maximum Balary is $4Q0y tho nchoohTittHitor't WOO. -Tho number of missionary stations !w Afrlra now oxr.ocds r�u�. Thote are 400.000 converts, and thn number is in- ! croaslncr at tho rato oT abotic 'AUOO a year. IViUiln five years more than 'J00 , n.itlves liavo nuiToroU mariyrdom Tor their faiib. - Ak the result of^ rurcnt rnvival incotln^ri at t'loveland, Tonu., "ri0 con* verts joined the rhutvtu's of ttiolr hiih'o. fullown: Mnlhoillit Kpiicopal Sou tli. liM; Mo thud 1st Kplttoopal, 78; Cumtierhind I'rosbyiorian, to; Proaby-10rinii. -ii. ihiptist. Si; Lho Disciples of Ctirltt, 'ia. -Tho Northwostorn  ITnfvfrslty has regislorpd uvei* -UiO Rtudontu in tho Pre-urutory Seliool apalnsl about 400 last year.   In Min l'Vosbmiin c.la^s over J50 are registered. Toptuvidn for incroaned uuihiT ot studonl-M tho university has pennd    ihrcti    additional   rucitation rooms, nod :\,ddod to llrt teACbinu forcO. It Irv dialed Lhat the report of tbo lato voynl i-uiiirnL*5doii on tho Idled nud oaf hi�:* p:';::!;ii*ed a vevy favoriibiiioflQct in India, and that voluntary contributions are iort'iiroininj; lor tho orection In Calcutta uf an educational institution for Um: deaf.   Uiibnt' (.iirindra Nalh Itofto. a naitvt: Kcutletnan. promis�si,4e0 upoes pei1 ^iinimi for throo years and 000 rupflos at once.   Those contributions thf* Helical Government will Hup-ploment by arrant frittn  public funds, and nmW li^  anspiues  inquiries are boinff madn in ICn^htni) for a competent oral tench hi Prof. Arthur Dodol, of tbo University of Zurich, sjiya that he has observed, nf hU students in botanic microscopy, that the avora^o "f those from America drew hotter than those from Kurupp of the same ajjr who competed wiih ihem. To this ho would add the rlrcUHi:+i,.in<,r  ng thn past two years, tbo t�*..,hni[[iio ot roprodurtifjii b;�s roude moco progress than in any uUiur part of the world. For the caiisn uf tlii� s tvoitld, hesays. i{ivu a uniLed I'rotMsi'rintchiirch, Including l.Si>0.oi�>   those w)io aro otherM'iso unable to ^nt'iire such ad vantages. Tho institution vili be thrown opeu to mechanics, laborers, profession.^ men and people of all grade* and occupations who dcalro to avail themselves of the ho no fits. A triilinjj yearly fee will ho charged. The hest (nr-'-ruetors to be hud w'tl bo ao-curod for tho work. At Cambridge, lSnglaiid. the university branchoi have ten tuuusand students, and Oxford has elcvnu Ebousuttd- A   MIXED   COLLISION. A 4raailmnlh�r'* Optnloa. -Orandma. my fiancee has rt�-Mlftir pat   Uiiny dollars  into a ((old AiaUa grondma- You'd hotter marry ouo ttiai mCiam, auts her Ungttr In a iilvor o*e.-Jawelor'g Weekly. oomotory An XHih Uelinltlo '*Fa�� a>> you know what s�r **At eoorso Oi do.   It's a ulaco whora folks lives afther they're do^d, aorr. Waal Hboro. - Wot belter or worse,- IS ebevra tbo old in a Id* ta Ihj inken for �h�7 tike It to last all their llvtis. ft�l�a*t�'a iDutothlnK ihnt pleuU tbora bettor Ujqp that la*a*c Uk bo takon for wlvoc ; -Philadelphia TLuea. -Jliaisttrriul Friend-"What do you MmX it hardest to overcome, my lad7* Yoaaay Suithly-"Ilor father's preju-Aao against me,"--Yankee Ulude. t.     SCHOOL   AND  CHURCH. -At a larijo board school in l�ugland tQtlooyn arofi-lvon a bath oncn a wo ok. -Tiiore are liiO.B'Jl children enroilod to the oity Kehooitt nud un uversRO ot UI,B17 of tboso attended school dally during ftoploiubor, who wore uwight by *�W0 teach urn.-Chicane Tribune. -In Berlin a ucboolinistross receives IPOO annually durln)r tho Urst years ot feftr Mrvke: u Hehoolmaator, JMOa After V/hr tb� Wiml-Mlll Mint Hu� No l'n 1th In A drummer for a Buffalo house had observed 'hat he meant to buy an accident insurance policv, buL lorgot it, when tbo ugunt ^or tt Wisconsin wind-m\\\ repUed. "I had a little experience that way ftbout ton years ago, uiiii alnco I ^ot well I prefer to travel on my shape, watched ovur more or lsas by Providence." Of eonrao we all wanted to hear the particulars, and ho kindly continued; H w,is tm the Illinois Cnutrul. \ got 1 an accidiifit policy in Chicago, and' started out. luulinjj that 1 had dune tbo iTWi-.t tiling. ISix hours liter, just, as thu pni-UT was maltiiiff up the first berth, vm struclc a horso on llni Iracl: and half Hie train went iniu thn ditch. You with to the halli''1 queried ono of tho gruiiu. Or coni'nu. Our car turnod ceroplote-ly over and (bU or rollnd down a bank tweWo fpttt high." And all the paaseiitfui-4 were killed or hurt?" No, air, not h person wan killed, and I was the only one out of twenty who was hurt   1 had my skull fractured, my lejy broken, five teuth knocked out and a foot smashed, and not another person could show a scrateb." How do you account for it?" 1 was tho onlv ono with a policy." But that couldn't account for it," \V*ll, then, all the others had just accepted and wore reading tracts juat handed them by a roving evangelist   I didn't Uvku one." But that wouldn't explain It, either," persisted tho other. -Oh, well, t.hon, I had just called a ohap with whom I was playing ouch re ,i \v.\r, &n& 1 t\nn\t he and \ and the collision tfut mixed up. However, there was a misLake in the date of the policy, and 1 K"t no buuufU, and I want uoth* Ing moro to do with such insurance. Makes a policy bolder inn reckless with bis mouth."-N. Y. Sun. -xvicnarti xttacicmore, whose name, notwithstanding many later novels, is UBHociatud with "Lornfl Doono," 1h a lineal descundunt of good old Dr. Doddridge, and resides at Teddlngton on tbo Thames. Ho ia averse to notoriety aad is known among his neighbors for hiB success in market gardening and fruit raising, rather than by hia literary triumphs. lie is now past sixty, and lives a retired llfo in his lovely home, tmrroundr-d by rural scenes. In the composition of his novels ho exuroisns tho greatest care and sometimes produces only a single paragraph at a nit-ting.-N. Y. Ledgor. -A BL Louis genius, says Polloe Captain Hoyd, of that uity, has invented a rubber billy for policemen and watch* won. It is made of heavy rubber, such as is u�od in hose, is flexible, yet very solid, and has tho merit of stunning a person without breaking the Kculp and causing the tluw of blood. It is alio guaranteed not to fraoturu the skull, A PATRIOTIC PEOPLE. Fonilnrfti of thn Armenians for Th*tr Ha* clonal Mturatnr*. _,uo fondness of Armenians for their national literaturo must appear, to those foreigners who havo any knowlodgo ol it, like tho Intense love a mother manifests for nor deformed child at whom strangers glance and shudder.   Ancient "rmi'ni.'in literature is a rollootion of ty, ihmly annals ensbrl-'jing deeds ol .arlng, glorious achlovenien is that would iivfl made Dryasdust bimsoU a second Uomer bad be undertaken to deniTlbo hem; and yet in  Armenia they aro more matter-of-fact annals, the poetry of which It needed all tho asceticism of Oriental Christianity lo suppro s.   Tho literature of modern times is more diversified, but less original.   It Ih still in the translation period, tho classic works of other literatures being rendered  accessible to Armenian readors who live outside the palo of civilization in A bur be id jan and nt the foot of Mount Ararat. Noble efforts, however, aro beingmade by all elates to contribute to its development. Russian Armenians, for lu.-stance support two daily newspapers* one wcokly, and three monthly roviows, and translations from Fro nob. and English works aro boing continually published. The con sure, howovor - that blight of literaturo and clog of all Intel loctual progress-is also at work, and to considerable purpose. The difilcultlos with which tho Armenian press has to contend in Uuasianre enormous; whole pages are cut out of tho reviews, long paragraphs suppressed in the daily newspapers, all or which havo to beoxwinirjcd and approved in writing by these llta> ary policemen beforo they can be published. Armenian publications printed sIbo-whero aro carefully rovised and expurgated bufore boing pnt in tho hands of their roaders in Russia. The Shah ol Vorsia, whoso partiality for hla Armenian subjects is as well known aa their oxomplary loyalty to their sovoreign, lately paid a visit to tho Cntholieos o! the Armenians at Etchmiodzln, but tho Russian authorities strictly forbado the Armenian papers to give a detailed account of tho visit or to allude to it otherwise than in the measured words used by the otilclal journal in its few casual remarks on thisovont. Another in stance-and tho.lnst that I shall bring forward-of tbo earnest do-termination of tho Russian authorities to cut down every growth of national life is as incredible in appearance as it is imprudent in fact In the hope of enlarging the intellectual horizon of the common people, and aronBing in them an enlightened interest In questions ot history, literature, science, a scrios of cheap llttlo primers were issued in Armenian, containing each the story of tho lire oT somo hero, or tho account of soiuo memorable event in the world's history, in simple words, perfectly free from all objectionable tendencies-so free, Indeed, that the censure, so chary ot its Imprimatur to Armenian publications, approved tho little pamphlets, which wore printed. Very soon, however, tho government declared that, although eaoh little book was in itself quite harmless, yet the fact that the series contained tho lives of such porsona as Joan of Arc; William Toll, etc, related In away that charmed the minds of the people, coupled with the circumstance that these primers were bought up in a vory Bhort time, was a sutllciently clear indication ot a stato of feeling which the Government could not tolerate. And the further Js-suo of theso little books, some of which were literal translations of sketches written and published by Russian pedagogues for Russian children, was forth-"with prohibited-Fortnightly Review. A RUNAWAY BELLE, Th*  (.'rum- oT a Harkentlna  UamoralUrd by u Pretty Snraoan OltU The bar ken tine Malay, owned by Nick Richards of this city, was recently the scone of a littlo romance, the details of which have boon received ia this city from tho officers of tho vessel. The Malay is expected bore in a fow days. Previous lo going north she dopartod from this city tor Tongatobeo, a poriin tho Samoan Islands. After   discharging   her cargo   she loadod with ballast and set sail for the north.   When the vessel was throo days out a superstitious sailor approached the captain with  fear and trembling. He said that he had beard some unearthly nui.se scorned to proceed from the hold of the ship,   lie vividly described it as similar to the groans of some suffering spirit confined in  the lower regions. Hardly    crediting    the    story,    but rather    with   a view   to   squash  it , before   it spread   among tbo   crow, ' the captain,    backed  by  bis   entire , 1 crow, UfUfd up tho hatch.   The unearthly noise was again beard, and with greater distinctness, and the investigators were thoroughly frightened. The captain peered through the eoml-dark-noss and saw, to his astonishment, a Samoan girl arrayed In tbo restrictive dross of her country.   She was lying In-tho hold, sleeping soundly and snoring loudly.   With a foreboding that he had an elephant on his hands, the captain roused the dusky sleeper.   She did not appear startled in the least, but complained of being hungry.   Every sailor on the ship offered to nhare his iness with her, and an intense rivalry for the possession of her affections at once ensued. The stowaway could speak a little English. tihe managed to say that sho had deliberately secreted herself in tho hold. She wanted to boo tho world, and >ho begged not to be taken back. The captain was between two flies. To return her to her home would cause loss of a week's time; to allow her to remain on board was to risk instibordiua tlon on the Malay. He chose the latter course, however, and the dusky islander accompanied him to Port Moody. On thu way uho had a half dozen offers of marriage, all of which she politely re fused with a domuroneas that -would have created envy in the heart of American flirt. When tho Malay arrived at Vancouver the Samoan beauty was takeu ashore and put Into service with a family residing there.-San Francisco ChronicJe. The New Paper 19 and 21 East Sherman Bank and County Supplies Now is the time to. Order Your -f-BLANK BOOKS-*- For the New Year.   It is also the Season to have Your MAGAZINES BOUND. We Make Blank Books to Order. Write THE NEWS to us for Prices. WTING AND PAPER Of Every Description at News Office Job the Rooms Bill -Melted butter la a good substitute lor oU-vo oil in naiad dressing. Many profor tho butter to oiL - v.iii-*Muat TOturnod item   Top-mount?   Huw did you Ilkn tho place?" Phil- "Not ut all.   IU Hltuutlon 1b too olevatud and tbo air too rara"  WUV "Hut   tho   iicxoinuJoiliUlons?"   Phil-"Thoy with r.iror."-Yonlteo Blade. - "Tlinro, John, that la an ox. The shoos on your foot are mads from tho hide o[ an uiiimul Ulco tbafc" "I don't; Boe bow that can ta. My abooa ir� black.    Ho'h a ruusei leather ox."-^ , Ilarper'u Uaiar. =YOU  WANT Heads, ~^ Letter Heads, Note Heads, Statements Envelopes, etc., And we Can Print them for You, Wedding, Ball and Party Invitations, Fines! Line and Latest Styles. Gall or Write The News Printing and Paper Company. 3009   

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