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Hutchinson News Newspaper Archive: October 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - October 12, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                Hl'TCTOSON DAILY NEWS: SCNDAT M0RflIN6, OCTOBER 12.1880. 1 The Grain XInte. Trom Umi Kansas City Commeitl&l. .   Tho grain produceT ot iho U&ns MIb-lontl country have not receiver) the consideration at the hands of tho railway commissions which the magnitude of their interest and Ita relations to the trade ud commerce entitles tbein. Their appeal to the Kansas commissioners for rates which would facilitate the movement of their products to their natural markets was met by tho making of a distance tariff which affected reductions . between points of no consequence to the grain producer and which but slightly reduced the rateB from the producing districts to their actual markets. Tae investigation into the situation by the Intesrtate   Commerce Commission ru suited la the making of a rate for die ttnces of 500 lulled and more from Chi cago and Mississippi river which reaches to points 200 miles westward into Kansas and 250 miles westward into Nebraska, Tola rate tho railroads have decided to accept from the Missouri river eastward but only one road has to far indicated n willingness to make it effective west of the Missouri river, and mere is grounds for auspecting that it may not do so. In bo fat as this rate reduces the costof ship-menu from the river eastward it is beae nci�l, but it ignores the actual gram markets for the whole trans-Missouri country. ' Tne corn and oats produced west ot the  Missouri river ilad their natural markets on the Missouri rtvor and from these points are distributed to tbe south and southeast. Tho rates made by the Kansas commission ana by the Interstate Commerce Commission do   not change thiB situation kb they are not sufficient to divert the trade from the natural markets on the Missouri river Co points on the Mississippi river and to Chicago; hence the rale has no application to the actual movement of the grain,   The wheat produced west of the Missouii -  river is of a different variety from that produced east  of the   river or in the northwest, and ita markets where It Is sold'and where the value can be gotten for It, are on the Missouri river alone. The wheat of Kansas is s hard winter wheat; the Chicago market is a spring wheat market, and St. Louis is a soft winter wheat market, consequently the wheat product of Kansas cannot ob tain its lull value In either place, and to these It would have to go to derive any benefit from the rate made by the Interstate Commerce Commission, In evldenoe of this proposition we cite the fact universally known among grain merchants that the winter wheat of Kan sat, on existing rates, has steadily commanded from three to five cents per bushel better prices at the Miaaouri river than it obtains at any other point. The grain 1b shipped here and from here into (he milling districts east of the Missiesip J>1 river, getting the benefit ef through rates which haB enabled the Kansas City merchants to pay higher prices than can bo obtained at the Mississippi river or Chicago. The difficulty has arisen from an appar ent unwillingness on the part of both tht Kansas commissioners and the Inter state commissioners, to recognize the course of trade and the actual markets for the grain; and what is wanted, not ao much by the merchants engaged in haud ling tho products as by the producers, if a rate that recognizes Missouri river mar kets and makes rates which would enalilt the grain to be marketed here under proper conditions. The recognition of the Missou>-i river   markets and the making of rates on that basis would add several  cents   to the  value the entire wheat crop of the trans-Mis souri country, and would be an act of justice to the grain producer which tb action of the commissioners haa so ' tailed to secure. The time, perhaps, not yet for a united struggle on the part ot all parties Interested for such rates bb would be Just and equitable, but it muat �oon occur that some party in authority . will be appealed to in behalf of this _ great Industry of   the trans-Missouri "*" country to s� help the situation as would secure the benefits desired, which may be done without the slightest injury transportation companies and without the slightest reduction in their revenues, what have they done during the session ust closed to show that they deserve such grant of power ? Here is a test that testes to recent transactions. Put aside all the things that have figured In pre-i vious canvasses, and try the case according to this latest testimony. There is no necessity for going back any further to find sufficient reason why thecountrycan not afford to take the risk of alecting another Democratic house. Our Governor, rom tin* Dodge city Qlohe-Rcpiibllcan. Last Thursday evening our city was again honored with a visit from that dis-nguished and most welcome personage, Governor Lyman U. Humphrey. Arriving at noon on the Hock Island road, and accompanied by Col. Kmmett Callahan and Mr. A. O. titacy, the party were met by a delegation of citizens and escorted to their quartern at the Delmonico. After dinner carriages were provided and the party were driven to tho rloldlers1 Home and State Forestry station, and alco were shown about the city. At 1 o'clock a public reception was given by the t'lienix club, of which the governor is an honorary member, and when at 8 o'clock he wbb escorted to Kelly's opera house' tbe hall was already filled to its fullest capacity, and as the governor and party entered they were cheered to tbe echo. The exercises pened with a song of welcome by a quartette composed of Mrs. L. K Miller, Mies Lucy Baird, Messrs. 1). W. Mollu and L. A. Lauber, with Mrs. M.. II. King presiding at the organ, after which Chairman E. E. Smith Introduced Governor Humphrey. The speaker, in a plain, logical and convincing talk of two hours held the closest attention of his listeners, and as one by one he met and knocked the arguments of bis opponent of a few evenings before into Bmithereens, was greeted with rounds of applause. He spoke particularly concerning the Boldiere' Home-an institution which is very dear to our people-and towards the advancement of which he feels the deep est interest. Another Ford county insti tutlon which the governor hopes to see maintained and enlarged IB tbe Forestry station. No public speaker who ever visited Dodge City met and shook hands with so many people, and none have more personal acquaintances here than Qovernor Humphrey. After the speaking tbe railroad boys tendered the governor an invitation to attend their ball, which was in progreaB at the rink, the invitalicn being accepted by him. His visit called forth much favorable comment and added scores ot friends to Mb already large number. We are glad our gevernor paid ub visit, and bo far as Ford county is con corned we feel safe In eaying that after November 4th we may still continue to addresB him as our chief executive. Pawn Itv tho meadow the HtUo brown thrushes Bullfl tlietu n rest iu tlio enrtx'rry Imsiie*. Anil when it In flnUhcd all coxy null neat, Turra r\uvcUUk\ v.gmt mi&u their tiiwwim cora-1>UU<\ Twit-tcr^e twlttcrl" thry otttrp to each othur, 'RulUUnp a lu'Rt t� no ewt of liothcr; But oli, wlion our dear little lilnlles we Roe, flow happy we'll bo? How lmppy wo'll bol" Up at tlio iMittaRA w]u*ro children aro growing, Tli-j yoims mother patiently situ at her sewing. It's sometfiiuK to work for small hobhloilohoys That will tear their trousers ami nmko such a noL�e; "Anil one must admit," says tho tlenr little mother, 'That bringing up lioys Is no entl or n bother, But oh, when they Isltw me, ati'l climb on my knoe, It's sweetness for mol  It's sweetneis foe me,!" -Unidentified, rJIFIDS  AND   BOYS. A BALLOON TRIP. Yh� New Democratic Record. From Ojft 8t Louis Globe-Democrat. The Republican majority of the houBe made some mistakes during the late eea Blon, arid wasted eome time that might have been usefully employed; but its record as a whole is highly creditable comparison with that of the other side, From first to la&t the Democrats did . everything iu their power to embarrass the proceedings and to prevent necea Buy and proper legislation. They started out with the avowed purpoee of delaying the public bueinees and employing all the resources of parliamentary strategy to defeat the purposes and wishes of those who had the right, under the constitution, to control the course of events. This policy o obstruction was not adopted with reference merely to measures that were politically objectionable. It was applied to all measures, and was designed to block1 the wheels of legislation in a complete sense. The Republicans ware obliged' to resort to arbitrary and unusual: methods In older to effect the | passage of bilia that should � not have been antagonized on any account-bills providing means for carrying on the government and protecting1 theta&tioB&l credit and honor. In not a tingle instance did the minority honestly! recognize its obligation to serve the people in a practical and reasonable way, ac-1 oording to well-established principles of1 official responsibility. It simply resisted everything that was presented, and thus prolonged the session at great expanse - and In contempt of public opinion, This aspect of the matter is the one that needs to be kept plainly before the ..votersof the country in the pending : campaign. When the Democratic orators talk about the shortcomings of the He-publican majority of the house, let them be promptly and vigorously reminded of the infinitely greater offenses of the fllll-tuaterlng minority. It w&a the latter and not the former that kept congress in session so long, and caused so much trouble In the adjustment of important issues. Let the blame be put where it properly belongs. The Ke-publicans are not required to make a de-' ftmiive canvass this year, any more than 'they were two]ears ago. They have even mora matt r^l now than they had then fox waging an aggressive fight, and that *t* the plan wblon they should everywhere teiolutely pursue. The Democratic record of the last nine months it utterly con- � teropUblH and scandalous. There is not a f  nnd *� of tho yonr 1W>3 will bo found repnrtB of Professor Mfizuni aud his biillnnn "Tho Princess," awl accounts'of u mu-coRsf ul iisceiiMion, nnd each day thereafter for tiie next len days the pnpers ro-cordrd flic fnet that "up to this tinin nothing has ye;. Iwen ltcml of the two men who niacin tht* iiRcrnt on tho 3d Inst. I turned np in Bombay in May of tho year recorded, after a year nnd ii half iu other portions of India, and very soon thereafter it, was announced In the pnpers Hint "Professor Mnznm, the celebrated i'Vt'iieli aeronaut., would soon rmiko an ascension from tho public gardeus," Three or four daya later 1 ran across the professor, and I was gratified ami surprised to \\w\ him t� Ih> none other thau tut old friend whom I had traveled with in China. He Wiisnu Knjdi.sh speaking Frenchman who had seen the. whole world and taken in all sorts of adventures, and had purchased tho balloon of a genuine aeronaut who had reached Bombay, with the idea of giving (occasions in all tho larger towns in the. vouutry. The aeronaut had fallen sick, been despoiled of his cash, and he sold liis balloon to Mazam and quit the country in disgust. Mazam was now going intoballoonin�(tor Lho nd ventures it might bring, and when ho invited mo to make the llrst trip with him I was not five seconds in giving him my promise. The 3d of June wna a feto day, and tho city was filled with an immense crowd. The balloon was new, very strong, and Wnsnm had plans beyond a mere ascension, We packed the car with provisions enough to last a week, took along rifles, revolvers and ammunition, and made nil propara tion.s for a long journey. The prevailing winds iu Bombay from May to July are from the south, or up the Arabian sen, and bo we privately counted on being wafted inland, perhaps to the Turkish boundary. Tho people in general had tho idea that we would descend within a few i hi lea of the townt and morn than a scoro of men cams forward and volunteered to make tbe trip with \m. Without her burden of baggage the balloou could easily have carried five or six men. As it was sho shot up like bird when all was ready to let go, and in a few secouds the city and harbor were fur below us. We at once started on our in land journey, taking a paeu of about, fifteen miles an hour, and for three hours everything worked smoothly nnd well. We made tho asceut at sharp 2. At 5 o'clock wo met a counter current of air from the north, und in five minutes the balloon had be#un to drive hack to tho south. Ballast was thrown out, and we leaped xip to find the current still stronger above. We then settled down as near the earth us it was safe to yo, but still wo drove back over our course. Seeing- that we had to go, ballast was flung out to give us a higher altitude, and we moved to the rthwest at tho rate of ten miles an hour. In an hour wo could discern the sea and its coast line, and us evening came we left the land and hovered over the Gulf of Cam. hay. This was tho last seen of the balloou on shore. While Majiarn had never made an /iseen-sion before, to say nothing ot the management of n balloon, he had uo difficulty in handling it, and neither of us was at all timid. It was a serious matter to fiud the balloon sailing out to sea, but vre ate our supper at au altitude of halt a mile, ami hoped for a change of wind. At about 10 o'clock, our progress then being not over ten miles an hour, and a sort of tog shutting out sight of everything below us, I went to Bleep. Mazum was to arouse me at 13 or 1 to go on watch, but at sunrise both of ub opened our eyes and turned out at the same moment. lie had fallen asleep soon after I did, and the balloon had been left to take care of itself. Tho compass allowed her to bo heading due west at a gentle pace, but In another half hour she might have been in the seu, everything being saturated and heavy with dew. We were down where wo could plainly make oat several steamers and suiliug craft, and the ha 1!oon was evidently an object of great curiosity to the people on board some of thuni. Ballast was thrown out uulil we reached un altitude of 2,000 feet above the sea, and the sun soon dried tho dew and rendered the balloou very buoyuut. A stiff breeze also got up from the east, and by 7 o'clock we were muUiug railroad speed through tbe air, bound for the coast of Arabia. During the entire day, which was a very pleasant one, our traft took hoIo care of herself, never varying over fifty feet in her altitude, and driving so steadily that one had but to shut his eycB to imagine that she was standing still. From our perch we looked down on many craftdurlngthc day, aud were consoled by the thought that in casu of accident we were pretty sure to bo picked up. When night came we added 500 feet to our altitude oa an offset to the dew, and as the weather was fine we both lay down to sleep. I awoke twice during the night, bat to find all quiet, and when! turned out just at sunrise ftwaatoflnd tho Arabian coast almost under our feet. Had the wind hold steadily during the night we should huve reached the coast at or near Mirbat, but it hud changed two or three points and drifted us higher up. As soon as the sun had dried the dew we descended until not morethau l;O0Q feat above tho laud, nnd then wo made out a very bleak und sterile country under our feet.  \ We were on the northeastern edge of the over to mm. "i uon't know who'd those fellows take Un i'nr, but they seem bound to bring un down." ' There were fur or five of tho Arabs shooting nt us a; this time, and now and then we could cu'eh tho noiso of their bullets. If we went higher there was a feni of meeting with a current of air that might, set us off <  and Dlaak Teas. &U&AE8, ALL GRADES! CANNED GOODS, STANDARD BRANDS S A floe assortment of the oelebrated Monarch Brands of old Government 3ava, Arabian Mocha and the atiH more celolirated Ohaae and Banbomcom biliation of Mocha and Java in two pound fans, Finnst Oofleeln the world. Queensware, - Glassware - and  8tonewaret Haveland China, Fine Lampa, Lamp Fixtures, Fienon and Bedwing Potter;. Thanking our patrons, one and all. for past favors, we shall to the nest of oui ability, by honest and fair dealing, by just weights and full measure, strive to merit the oontinued favor of all. - Telephone 78. J ^VY. KANAGA & CO., BB N. MAIN The News Printing & PaDer Co.; 19 aad 21 East Sherman Street, A Flih Story. Col. Sinu, of tho Purk theatre, is telling one of the fishiest of fish storios. Ho says-and hc never pmiles when he says it-that ho wrb yachting and blnefishing At midnight Mazam shook mc I off Fire Island, and that a big ten pound and whispered in my ear; Come, now. hut here is ft sight worth seeing.   Bo careful to ranke no noiso. As I looked (ivec the basket ho lwlnted to the west. Thure, ou tho open ground,, made almost as Hunt aa day by the rising moon, was a hirge male- linn. Then hs pointed to the cast, and I turned my eyes th;it way to dh-covur another. Taking out Liulknm as a center, each animal wasuboul livy n>iiz awny .intt facing each other. 'They were roaring nt each other for fifteen minutes byfore I woke you," whU �red Mazam. ""It was a challenge to com-u, and now you will see some fmi."*1 The animals approached each other as you have seen two dogs, each carefully lifting his paws and setting them down, but they did not diminish the distance over a rod before both stopped aud stood aa ii cut. from stone. The only signs of life were the low growls of defiance. By nnd by one turned to tho right as if to hall circle the other. This was met by a coun tcr movement. Then he turned to the left, and was countered again. Then he backed ofr and the other advanced. Then he advanced and thu other Iwu.-ked off. Tha play had been going on iu this fashion foi at least twenty minutes when the one to the cast of ua made a rush so swift and sudden that wc could not follow him. The lieasts grappled and rolled over and ov making a tremendous fusM, hut after two or three minutes of thl*ouo of them turned tail nnd ran away, hotly pursued by the victor. The remainder of tho night passed without incident^ und aa daylight came a breeze from the north caruo with it After a cold bite we lifted our anchor and were off; but now wo found that after cvery pound of tho regular ballast had gone overboard we were not above rifle idiot from, the earth. And we had scarcely begun to move before we found ourselves above a long drawn out caravan or moving village, which bad just taken up ita lino of march. Perhaps all knew our craft to be a balloou; perhaps they believed it to he uome great bird. At any rate they began firing at us, and the very first bullet struck tho basket, it was an open country, and such men as were mounted on burses could keep up with us. Now, then," said Mazam, as the bullets continued to sing ahout us, "overboard with that keg of water, all extra clothing, everything to give us a lift out of range, and 1 will do some phooiiug for myself. fl� seized a riiJe and fired at a horseman almost under us, und then exchanged for the othcr-and fired at another, and by thin time wo were in ihe clouda and driving awfty at a much faster pace. Inside of an hour -the balloon began to approach the earth again, and as we wore driving toward Mirbat we threw over our overcoats, the �py glass and the box of bread. Wo shot upward and drove ahead for about fifteen miles, and then descended until wo were no more than GOO feet above'iho ground. To maintain this distance we bad to throw over the two rifles, and twenty minutes later we dropped into a field of maize just outside of.Mirbat.-New York Sun. bluefish ran away with his book and squid, and that, although there were several hooks aboard, there were no more squids; that ho wrenched off tho silver bundle of a handsomo umbrella that had been presented, to him tho winter Moro by his Hon Walter, and miming tho hook through it used it for a squid. The silver head," said tho colonel, 'was bright and highly polishod, and shuno iu the- water like a"thing of lifo. I had not been trolling with it iivo minutes beCorti 1 felt a tremendous tug on iny lino nnd then a quick Blackening. I pulled it in and found my umbrella bundle had been captured by a nidi. That traded our fishing for that day, and wo re-turned to tho Surf hotel much disgusted. I had entirely forgotten lho incident, when ono day a year later, after returning from Europe, I happened to bo dining ut John Baylis' with a party of friends. Wo ordered bluefish. Mine hoot brought on tho tahlo in due lime a magnificent fellow that must have weighed fully twelve pounds. I determined to carvo myself, and, sharpening uiy knife, cut it open in tho middle. Wovdd you \h*Uovo \\, to my surprise, right in tho stomach of that fish I discovered tho silver head of my umbrella that I had used for a squid the year before!"-Brooklyn Eaglo. DOES A GENERAL 106 PRINTING. Book Making -AND- Who rules in this town ? Depends on the question up, The   lamp-chimney    queS- Arablnu dram, and It T a^Bood hour to- ,       r     ,        1 , ^ , - fore wo saw uny signs of Civilization. Me�u- tion-wnatsort do you break r wiiiie, bother us knowing wii�t.sort of peo- AA^hntPvpr snrt- vnur r1f>al*>i> ! P'� w0 b-Htl to deal witb, wo bad loaded all vv uaicvci sun yuur utdier j tlw flTOltm8 (lud m;ldo apUa of guch ^ gago utj could he thrown away in case we wanted a higher altitude. If our air ship had lost any great amount of gas up to tills time we could not perceive it.  Hero and there was a wrinkle in tbe silk to prove that the safety valve had been opened to sive us a drop, but ft did not aeem as if uu ounce bad escaped by any other nu'ans.  Wo had no sooner left tho water thun the breeze began to subside, and our pace was reduct'd to five or six miles an hour.  We knew that n counter curront would soon be met with, aud both were looking over the edge of the basket at the moving panorama  below when wo suddenly espied a native village.  It wo*, ratber, the camp or somo wandering tribe, all the sbelten being of canvas or skin. Wo saw cameb), asses, goats and horses. deals in. How, do you think, he selects his chimneys ? He buys those that cost him least; he can get the regular price for them; and the faster they break the more he sells. That's how he reasons. Tell him you want Mac-beth's "pearl top "or "pearl glass," tough glass, transparent, clear, not foggy, fine, of right shape and uniform. Tell _ . J 1       ,,,,,>n ,_ . , with many people moving about, and wi him you 11 pay htm a nickel ^ ouly jj^fa Qi thom When they  _ i__�__n   ,_i____j ment station, maintains, as the result of and W6 bind Magazines ftnd JLaW ISOOkB IB, all Styles BOA personal observation, that bees do no __      . ,   ,, , ,     ,     � ,,   , dumugo to growing or fair fruit. The at luwest.prioes.   we wiBn tne publio to unaerstanQ tnat juice of fruit is, in fact, injurious to , i. i�   a   * them, and they do not attack sound we ox6 ready and prepared to execute any Kino, of fruit, but only bruised fruit, or that which baa been previously injured by other insects. Very fow patrons of the turf appreciate the martyrdom of jockeys in reducing their weight. Tho torture they undergo Is terrible, and it is uot a wonder that so few of them see their hair gray. A popular dodge of late among tho dishonest followers of the turf Is the tapping of wires which convey raclug nows ana fleecing tbo bookmakers by sanding false reports. The dodge Is usaally upsucceasfuL Ben Kinney, who developed and has driven the phenomenal 4-year-old Ally Nancy Honks, 2:14X. in all her races, has been engaged at a liberal salary as trainer and driver for Vincent C. Cromwell, of I/sxlugtoo, Ey. Printing or Book Work! Have etock forms, but can make special forms to order. We guarantee all work and aolioit patronage. / Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.   Addrest NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO.: Mm ��utchinson�   

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