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Hutchinson News: Tuesday, September 30, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - September 30, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                2 Hl'TflHINHON DAfLY NEWH't TUESDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 30.1K90. ! H. W. Willett is now showing the largest arid Most Complete Line of Fiirniture in the city, having Consolidated his large stock with that of C. W. Bittman, consisting of Furniture, Carpets, Draperies and Shades, Making a stock far superior to that of any ever offered in the city. Low Prices, Good Goods and Courteous Treatment is assured to all. j ZEE. "VST- WILLETT, No. 12 North Main Street, Next Door to the Grand. the  AULD  weal  MILL Oh, g(n y� coind Lao oor farm toon. An1 dam1�r 'nenlh Mm liUl, Ye'U wv> timonj; the bracken brain The mild tucnl mill Them rltia iho wlmlliT wfiuplin' burn- ^A Utnnitt, br/iLflin* rill, Ami loupln* "Corn It tulu's u turn Roun' uornulil mill Oh, Kit y� tloun auiuni* tdo trees,     l.iBi tJut tho hruo�i\ tho trill O' Wrtlii, aiwl qulVrlir, fuJlii' Ictwrs By oor mtml n.IH ' Or 8|m*h1 ftwa' too "Kalry Knowe," Ami i�po�) wl' flerln will Whaur mcw� grow nyout ihu knout* 'tliino   rnuldrm nsJc n fiilror nl-:ht, Kin? P'*au*!ful, on I in and still, Or vpi-w ri hooso twu� couth Itn' brlrbl As oor inciil mill. 'Pin; wtiwl gongs round an' round Hit* day (Jriiiiliir thu KriKt wl" will: An' jjoortHh's door iitiVr o|mmw Iran Thu auld meal mill -New York Truth. IVoiiderful Cliaiigca. In ouo of the Now England states there U a quiet little country town whither the railroad has not penetrated In which no new house has been built for nearly a quarter of a century, wjiilt* the phico bus fewer inhabitants than it hud fifty yearn ago. The oldest fuhabit-nnt is a man 90 years of nge, whose whole life has beeu passed In this, the town of his birth. He still lives in the houwa where lie was born. A Ktmn^.r from a distant city was talk-ins with this nyed citizen one day, when the old K^ntlenuin said: "Yet*, sir; I've lived ri^ht here in this villnt'u uiooty yearn. I've rsecn wonderful changes in that lime, sir-wonderful changes. I tell ye, the place is noinR right nlu'Jid." "In what w�yJ,,,u.sliedthcstrciiiK�*r, looking up and down the deserted street for some Induniionof this wonderful progress, "In what way^" repeated the old gentleman. "Why in different waytt. 1 can re-memi>er the time when we didn't have but one store here, and now we've got two and n meat shop, and there's talk of a millinery woman coming in here. Yes, sirl And we've got ten street lumps and a four hundred dollar organ in the church and a good half mile of sidewalks, all within my recollection. Wonderful changes going on all the lirue. TLiis is the age of progress, ain't it)*"-Youth's Companion. Tlio Itottle Fad. The bottle fad consists in writiug a message of some sort and corking it up in n bottle and sending the same afloat, to be picked up somewhere else. I've found 'em by the dozen on the beach, and had 'em bob into uie ou the breakers. The messages are generally dated in midocean and arc about a leaking Hhip or a ship on (Ire, and the writer has only a few minutes to bottle up in, Onec in a while the message iafrom a e-atbont driven out to seu or from some sailor floatinR on a wreck, and they are always interesting. There is uo law against this bottle tod, and tt acta as an escape valve. Those who practice- it would bo pointing unloaded guns or indulging in some other tomfool notion if they were debarred, nud so no objections are raised. The other day a bottle which was Intended to go to sea, but which landed only Imlf a milo away, contained a message written on the letter head of a hotel. It said, "Help wanted for :S00 people stopping here and suffering from poor food, high charges und plenty or liens." The Under carried it to the hotel, and the landlord began a quirt investigation, and at the end of twenty-four hours a smart Aleck of a young man, who had been the pet of the house, took a walk, and \� perhaps walking yet-Interview In Detroit Free Press. Cmnltlfl GIuhm. Some of the most beautiful speclmeuts of the popular novelty known as crackle glass are produced by covering one side of a plate glass wjth u thick stratum of flux or readily fusible glass, mixed with coarse fragments of glass; In this condition it U placed in a nniino or an open furnace, where it is strongly heated, and as Boon as the flux is melted and the glass itself has become red hot it is removed from the furuaco and rapidly cooled. Under this operation the flun or fusible glass cracks and splits, leaving innumerable Hue lines of fracture over its surface, having much the appearance of scales of irregular or)'8" tnls, which cross und intersect each other in every direction. The rapid cooling of the f iihihlu coating is effected either by exposing the heated moss to the action of a current of cold air or by cautious sprinkling with cold water. By protecting certain portions or the glass surface from the action of the flux these portions retain their original smoothness and polish, and form, of course, a striking contrast to the crackled portions of the surface. - Exchange. _ Albino Itttrrluit. A Mr. Hobday, of Blooming Grove, Pike county. Pa., has for years regularly picked and marketed a crop of albino huckleberries. Whether Hobday's oddity is a species by it.seIf or only a freak of nature uo one seems to know; one tiling is sure, the crop has beeu oT the albino order its fur back as tho niomory of the (irst settlers of Pike county. There is but one other jmt-ch that ({rows white huckleberries in the United Stuteaao faros known, that one is ou the farm of M. C. Everett, In Sussex county, N.J. Tho Pike county crop of albinos la usually alwut twelve bushels, the New Jersey patch rarely yields more than a bushel.-tit. Louis Republic, 111* Iluthurs. The "big four" were in bathing Friday afterooou. When they nil stood on tho spring board of the ruft there were even bets on shore that the board would break, bat the big bathers dived off Just in time to make those who wagered on tho board breakiug lose. The "big four" challenge tho county to produa) their equal in weight. When tbey marched out of the water tboy presented an imposing appearance, taking up considerable room on the beach, Tho names and avoirdupois of Che neovy weignts are ueorge Macartuuy, Me pounds; F. L. Dow, 20.") pounds; tho Love-dale brothers, 2f>0 pounds each; total, I.Wf pounds.-Santa Cm*/, Sentinel. How n Superstition Lingers. The universality with which watch charms are now worn is an evidence of the strong hold which superstition takes upon an ago or a people. Warriors ouce wore such trinkets for the supposed protection they gave.-Indianapolis Journal. Wearing rings on the fingers is certainly an ancient custom, for the hands of mum mies are often decorated by goldou circlets, and the slender hand of a woman with a little hoop on the third finger can be seen at any time in one of tho cases at the British museum. "BENNY"   FRIGHTENED  HIM. How im Ailvanofi Agont Was Disturbed While UcutUuc the Morning I'ajier. It was an Impromptu gathering of theatrical men-ono of those groups that congregate every once in a while and a sort of love feast is held. Well, the conversation turned to story telling, and some reminis-ceut. fellow spoke of Daniel in the Hons' den. "I'll tell you -vhat it is," said one, whose name, by the way, is Daniel. "You've all undoubtedly heard the Btory of Daniel in the lions' den, but I don't think you over heard of the lion in Daniel's den, did you?" Nobody bad, and so Daniel proceeded. "Some years ago," said he, "before I became an ordinary mauager, I was a wealthy aud popular advance ngeut, leading 'my' show and *iny* people to fume and fortune. I chance/1 to drop into Boston ono day, and stopped at a theatrical boarding bouse kept by an old professional, known as 'Mother' Lincoln. Well, it was night and I had been out-I was very tired, so went directly to bed. It. must have been about 9:30 in the morning when 1 awoke, and sent the porter for the Sunday pnpers. When he went out of my room he left tho door ajar, and I was too lu/.y to get up and shut it. "I read the paper for awhile, and soon became engrossed in a story about Sara Bernhardt, when an irresistible impulse to look up came over me. 1 looked up. "Great Scottl" said Daniel, wiping his perspiring brow, "the thought of my feelings then makes mo sweat to this day." "Well, what did you seel'" came in a chorus from the audience. "Nothing more nor less than a well developed specimen of the Numidiati lion gazing at mo close to my bedside. I'd heard about people's hair standing on end from fright. 1 reaii/i'd then what that meant. My blood congealed in my veins, and that lion seemed to grow to the size of an elephant. "Just imagine tho feelings of a man lying quietly in bed reading a Sunday paper, aud then looking up to see that terrific beast almost looking into his eyes. It was awful, gentlemen!  it was awful i "I realized, however, that I must do something, so, never taking my eyes from tho brute, who regarded mo with a sarcastic smile, I grasped tho bedclothes with one hand, a pillow in the other-to stuff in the lion's mouth if ho jumped nt me-and with a yell which would have made a Wild West Indian groan with envy I sprang to the back side of the bed. "With a wild roar of amazement the lion retreated to the door, aud thus for n few seconds tho beast and 1 regarded each other, when presently I heard a voice call ing: " 'Benny, Benny, whoro are you? Come right down here, sir1,' "To my unutterable amazement the lion wagged his tail, gave me a parting look and backed out through the door. "Ye goiisl but wasn't 1 relieved! and 1 fell (ha on tho bed, too weak to stir. After a bit I got up, dressed and found Mother Lincoln. 'Madame,'said 1, 'I wasn't .-.ware yon were keeping a menagerie. I thought this was a simple, ordinary boardinghou.se.' 'What do yon mean*' said she. And then I told her what had happened. "She laughed,said 'Look here,'and took me to a rear door which looked out lu the court yard, where, trotting up and down the yard, was 'Benny' und a lioness, *You see,' she explained, 'I was out with a circus and menagerie a few months ago that went to pieces. Noliody could get salaries, ho I got these cubs, and they have grown a lit tie since. I'm sorry Benny frightened you.' "-Chicago Times. Wilt're tho Habit-fi Smotto. The scientists, doctors and others who condemn the use of tobacco should visit Riam and Burmah. The writer, while in the United States navy, visited Bangkok ouce and was surprised at the indiscriml nate manner in which the natives indulged in the use of the weed. Handsome, dark skinned young women, in their many col oral garments, were walking about the streets pulling away at their cigarettes Old women, men, boys an.l even the chil dreti were smoking. It was a common sight to see little tots, not over 4 ur 5 years old, with a striii'.c of beads around their necks and a cigarette over each ear, smok tug like a full grown man as they trotted about as naked as on the day they were horh. Questioning an finglhdi speaking native, I learned that the children are taught to chew the betel nut mixed with tobacco and to smoke as soon as they are aide to walk. Notwithstanding this excessive use of tho seductive weed 1 saw no ill elVects from it. On the contrary, all of the chil dreu seen smoking were sleek, fat little bodies, who seemed to enjoy their cigar ettes.-New York Herald. Taxman I ii Honey, Some English physicians appear to adopt In their practice the honey found in such large quantities iu tho eucalyptus trees of Tasmania, the product of a small, black wild boo peculiar to that country. The honey^ Is a thick, homogeneous, somewhat transparent, sirup)' liquid, of a deep orange color, having in �dor suggestive at once of its containing eucalyptus principles, Is very soluble lu water, lu milk und in wine, but much less so In alcohol, and very difficult of fermentation. Thus fur ox peri menu show it to he u valuable all men t. an efllcientaud palatable substitute for cod liver oil, au antl-cutarrhal, an agent affect Ing tho heart in a manner comparable to bite ncuoi., i>..i- irec rvcr.n tne i:iconvo;;:^;;i properties of digitalis: a febrifuge, and an nuti-panisitic for tubercular and scrofulous ailments.-New Orleans Picayune. When WrlttUff. Why is it that people who don't know bow to do a thing nearly always display their ignorance by their over zeal. Take the one instance of letter writing, for example? A man unpracticed in the art will show that he is a *''prentice hand" at It, not so much by what he fails to say us by tho double trouble to which he puts himself to say too much. Never do you find him plunging at once, into the subject. He is always "taking his pen in hand" or "thinking he would write," when the mere fact of the letter b':ing sent is undeniable evidence of such a fact.-Argosy. Foil Nine ;y-(lve Feet �u r heart's ere the wanderer went on-- Lovo to **� saved for it, proffered to, spent oat | -Browuinjf. i   Wanted Pity. A traveler in a backwoods community, attracted byn noise in a cabin not far from the roadside, stopped and, addressing a boy that sat.on a feuce, said: "You live shout here. I suppose?" "Yep, jestssbout." "Well, can you tell me what makes that peculiar noise up yonder in that cabin?" "Yep, it's pap an* mam." "What arj they doing-beating a carpet?"        ! "Nop, beatln' one 'outlier,** "You don't say sol" ""Who said i didn't!" "I mean is it possible?" "That's wbut it is." "What ur�j i hey beating each other tort" " 'Cause they're flghtln'." "Is it possfljle that you sit here so complacently unq see your father beat your mother?"     | "i don't sif him n-beat'iu' her." "Yes, but i on know that he is." "I know lu V t ryin' to. If you're here to pity mam, ni�ier, you'd better ride on. Mam's the b� ^ up thar, I'll tell you that. Hoi' on, did "ii hear that thump! Wall, that wux daita-comiu' down ou the punch-in' tlo' Mail hits him, but she lets him drnp himself Reckon you'd better go on, or stay an' (My pup a while."-Pittsburg Dispatch. Tho An ami Harvard, an western busii heard of the had won tut it for hiinsel to visit it. 11 was willing t er they "did' eruble thoron The visitor be saw, and about the n' of admission peases.   Wl; was time to que-stious hu query which considered ofj showed how conceive of than as a schi "I am grea^l he said, "und I'd like to nsti of this concer] tiusidg ofits" at Harvard, bit of a story comes from s vouched for as genuine. A �v.m man who had all his life iniversity, and now that he !�} and leisure wished to see recently went to Cambridge found one of the faculty who how him about, aud togeth the institution with consul bhness. jtvas much Interested in what ked a good many questions mberof students, the terms ud especially about the ex he had seen all that there Low him and all his otb� r Ijeeu answered he put tie >m his uir it was evident he great importance, and which "mpoHsible it whs for him to ly great enterprise otherwise me for making money, y obliged to you, professor/* |t here's just one thing more >ou.   Who gets the profits -"-Book Buyer. lining (o Cuba. The British consul general at Havana in a recent repoi t describes the results of the late discover.i  asphalt,    nuiiuaiiese,   gold   and   other metals *Stif have on seve call the atieui the opening (J in the island, but in 1880-81 of the eustern provinces, followed by discoveries of then." says Mr. Crowe. "I :! occasions endeavored to on of the British public to ha oilers for mining enter prise, but hltij.rio tin- Held has been left to the Americai-. who during the last dec nde have majie some profitable ventures. The Americans have made n good beginning- Cerjnan consular reports have already dniwii attention to thum-and it would be a ihutter of regret should En glishmeii (who often travel far to make doubtful Investments) neglect good opportunities nearer home." Money In Cutting und Hewing;. Any woman who cm cut and fit a dress waist-not botch it, but lit it lo the figure -can command a salary of fcl.OUO iu any large city in the Union. More than that, she cau be as pert as she likes, have all the privileges she wants, scold the help, buss the customer and pad her back, shoulders und chest with hair cloth and cotton but ting. The forewomun who is able to take charge of uu establishment and originate designs cau get n $i*,5(K) position any day :n the week, with u transatlantic voyage and all expenses puid for a Paris vi^it to see tho styles, A girl who can take a waist after It is fitted 'ind trim it gets ISO a week aud works from 8 until 6. with an hour for lunch-Skirt cutters, who never sew a stitch, are paid from $20 to $25, which is a much better sulary than the average teacher in the public or private school gets, and not anything like as hard on the nervous sy* tern. Drapers earn from $18 to *20 a week, waist finishers from $10 to *1B, ekirtmakers from 15 to $10, and sleeve hands are In de-maud at 98, which is a better salary than thousands of typewriters In downtown "    are getting.-New Vork World Cn�t of ii Great 11 ouse. What does it cost to keep up a great house? Everybody knows that it is ox-pensive, but ii
                            

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