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Hutchinson News: Saturday, September 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - September 27, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                Keep Posted. During the Campaign by Subscribing for tho News. Ir Hutchinson Read the Advertisements And Patronize tho Business j| Houses Advertising in the News. VOL. VI. HUTCHINSON, KANSAS, SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1890. NO. 36. NEARING THE END. tueBday Fixed for the Final Adjournment of Congress. Tiic Conference Report on the Tariff Itlll to bo Considered In the Honso To-day. tion of the bill to establish a United States land court and provide for the settlement of private land claims, The bill went over without action, Senate bill to authorize the construe-Monrof a bridge across the Missouri river in Boone county, Missouri, was p�B8ed, and the senate adjourned- A Number or Minor Bill" Passed t>r the Senate - the Alien Contract Law ' Amended In the Interests of Foreign Actors, Musicians and Mini.tors of He. Union-Sliver Purchased Yesterday-Treasury Disbursements-Other Mat-tern. Washington, Sept. 25.-The following bills were passed: House bill authorizing the issuance of subpu-nasto compel the attendance of witnesses before the townBlto trustees in Oklahoma. Senate bill for the Bale of certain Mew York Indian lands la Kansas. Senate bill granting the tight of way through the Indian territory to the Sher-man and Northwestern Railroad com pany of Texas. A senate amendment was concurred in to house bill for the establishment of a light station and fog Bignal near Brad drlck Faint, Lake Ontario. At this point Mr. McKinley of Ohio entered the chamber with the confer . ence report on the tariff bill under bis arm and was greeted with applause from the Republican side. He submitted the report and it waB ordered printed in the Jlecord, Mr. McKinley then gave notice that to-morrow immediately after the reading of the journal he would Call up the report for consideration, and final disposition. Mr. McMillan of Tennessee trusted that gentleman would not insist upon that. The conferees had not agreed upon the most of the controverted matters un til yesterday evening. Some of them had not been agreed upon until today. The members of the house had never heard or seen the conference report. It could not be properly studied within the time indicated. It was utterly impossible to have a calm and thorough investigation of this important measure within the time mentioned. He hoped that the gentleman from Ohio would allow the report to be taken up Monday instead of tc-morrow. There was no disposition on the part of Democrats to delay consideration, but the bill should be carefully considered. Mr. McKinley said that the bill as it would be printed contained all the changes which had been recommended by the conference committee. Whenever a paragraph had been amended that paragraph would appear in small capital i letters. As to many of the principal fea-A'tureB of the bill tho points of disagreement (' had been perfectly well understood for weeks, and it waB perfectly understood what the conference committee had recommended. It was late in the seB-Bion. The gentleman on both sides were anxious to get home and he must insist upon the consideration of the report after the reading of the journal tomorrow. Mr. McMillin thereupon insisted upon the reading of the conference report. The reading of the report was not completed when the hour of 0 o'clock arrived and the house took a recess, the evening session to be for the consideration of private pension bills. - Before recess Mr. McKinley offered for reference a resolution for the final adjournment of congress on Tuesday next at 2 o'clock. Purchases of Btlver, Washington, Sept. '20.-The treasury department to-day purchased 105,000 ounces of silver, paying $1.18 for 40,000 ounces and $1.11)>^ for 05,000 ounces. The amendment offered waB 1,060,000 ounces. The total purchases of silver to date under the new law ie 7,217,000 ounces. The treasury department gave notice to-day that the government has purchased all the Btlver authorized by aw for the present month and that no THE TARIFF. An Epitome of the Changes Made by the Conference Report October 0 Fixed as the Date When /  the 11111 Shall Take Effect. further offers would be considered until after the 1st of October, The Time Extended. Washington, Sept. 20 -The limit of time wlliilu which other governments may make arrangements for entering into reciprocal arrangements with the United BtatoB for the free importation into their countries of American agricul tuial products has been extended six months, or until January 1,1892. The Census Department. Washington, Sept, 20.-The cen�u: bureau to day announced the population of cities and towns as follows: Council Bluffs, la., 21,898, increase. 3,325; Creston, la., 7.015, increase. 2,114: Des-Moines, la,, 50,007, increase, 27,050. Interest Prepaid. Washington, Sept. 20.-The amount of interest on government bonds prepaid yesterday was $250,220, making the total payment to date $0,510,017. BET/TEH OUTLOOK. The Provision far a Bounty on American Sugar Betalned-Imported Sugars He-low Sixteen Dutoh Standard to be Admitted Free-Dutf on Binding Twine Fixed at Seven-tenths of a Cent Per Pound-Other Schedules. Washington, Bept. 26.-After ten days hard work the conference committee on the tariff bill completed its work late this afternoon and reported the result to the house. The committee had to deal with 401 amendments, many of them Involving cardinal differences of principle in treatment, and many the subjects of bitter controversies between conflicting inter ests. In the more important items of the kind, the result ot the committees' action Is as follows: The date when the bill is to take effect was made Oct. 0. February next 1b fixed as the ultimate date upon which goods deposited in bond before Oct. 1 may be withdrawn at the old rates of duty. SI-GAll. In the case of sugar the conference In place of the uniform bounty of two cents on grades of eighty and above, provided bytne house, included maple sugar and adopted the following provision: That on and after July 1, 1881, and until July 1, 1805, there shall be paid from any moneys in the treasury not otherwise ap propriated under the provisions ot section 8,680 of the revised statutes, to the producer of sugar testing not lees than ninety degrees by the polariBCope from beets, sorghum or sugar cane from within the United States or from maples pro duced within the United States a bounty of two cents per pound, and upon such sugar testing less than ninety degreea by Weekly Report of It. G Dan Jt Co.'s Cora-inerclAl Agency. New Yobk, Sept. 20.-R, O. Dun & Go's weekly review of trade says: Liqui-    , . dation in nearly all kinds of speculation ,ne polariscope, and not less than eighty ...   j,       . .     .   , degrees, a bounty of one and three-comes to the disappointment of many, in Jo*Ithaper *ound>underguoh ruleB connection with largely increased sup- and regulations as the commissioner of plies of money, and prepares the way for international revenue with the approval healthier trade in all legitimate branches �f the secretary of the treasury shall with lower prices. There appears a de- prittc,"6e-cafle o( importBd sugars the cided improvement in exports of pro- houBe line of 10 Dutch standard, below ducts, and the decrease for the past three which sugar is to be free, iB adopted, and weeks iB now only 4.5 per cent.,comparing on higher grades the result was a com- ,  , �,,   .       . ? promise as follbws: All sugars above No with last year. The imports are much P, DuT Btttndard ln oolo� 9Uall pay enlarged by an effort to get goods Into duty 0f   five-tenths of a   cent per thecountry before the new tariff goes pound;    provided,    that   all   sugars into effect, but current accounts of such above    No.    16    Dutch    standard . . i     . in color Bhall pay one-tenth of one cent increase are exaggerated. The value of pner�roundi ln Edition to the rate herein all imports for the three weeks has been provided for when exported from or the but 15}� per cent, above last year's rec- product of any country when and so long ord.  A considerable increase appeared as aucn country pays, or shall hereafter __,,,,, i:,-,, ,.ii,, ,,,� ,,h.. a., pay, directly or indirectly a bounty on the woolens, linens, silkB and other dry ^p'orta,io/of any Buch BUgar which may goods, but there is a fair prOBpect that De included in this grade which is the merchandise exports will new exceed greater than is paid on raw sugars in value the imports for the month. of a lower character and strength, and Grain does not move freely aa yet, but tna secretary of the treasury shall premie exports of cotton exceed last year's scribe suitable rules and regulations to materially, and provisions move in large carry this provision Into effect; and pro luantltles. The reportB from other cities vided furtner, that all machinery pur-snow a remarkable aotivity in all chased abroad and erected in a beet branches of legitimate trade. The ex- sugar factory and used In the production cess of bank clearings over those of the of raw sugar in the United States, from corresponding week last year in all cities Beets produced therein, shall be admit-outsldeof New Vork rises to 16 per ted duty free until July 1,1892; provided, THE 8ENATE. Washington, Sept. 85.-Mr. Sherman introduced a bill which was referred to the committee on appropriations, appropriating $133,000 for the purchase for use of the senate ot the Maltby house, at the corner of New Jersey avenue and Seventh Btreet, northwest with the vacant Jots on the north side of it The conference report presented yesterday on the bill to establish the Rock Creek park in the District of Columbia was taken up, agreed to and the bill now goes to the president for his approval, Bills on the calendar unobjected to were taken up (for one hour) and the following among others, were passed. Senate bill to authorize the construction of a bridge across the Missouri river at thsymost accessible point within one mile above the town of Wyandotte, Kan. The houBe joint resolution appropriating $1,000,01)0 for the purchase of nickle ore and nickle malte for naval purposes having been received from the house was laid before the senate. At the request of Mr. Hale, Mr, Cameron offered an amend ment to provide that such nickle ore or nickle malte so purchased shall be freely distributed among the contractors of nickle steel armor plating. After an extended debate Mr. Hale consented to let the joint resolution go over till to-morrow, saying he would call it up immediately after the routine morn-ing business. The consideration of the calendar was resumed snd the following bills pasBed House bill granting leave of absence to clerks and employes In first and second class poBtoffices. Senate bill authorizing the construction of a bridge acrosB the Osage river in Benton county, Mo. On motion of Mr. Blair the house bill to amend "an act to prohibit importation and immigration of foreigners and aliens under contract or agreement to perform labor in the United States, its territories and the District of Columbia," was taken from the calendar. Mr. Plumb moved to amend the 5th section, which provides that the act shall not apply to professional aotors, artists, etc., by Inserting before the word "artists' the words' ''musical or other." The amendment was agreed to. Mr. Carlisle moved to substitute for the words "regularly ordained or constituted ministers of the gospel," the words "regularly ordained or constituted ministers of religion," and said that with out that amendment the bill would ex elude Jewish rabbis. The amendment was. after some discussion, agreed to. - Mr, Plumb moved to insert after the word "artists," the word "musicians, Agreed to. Mr. Plumb offered an amendment that the bill shall not apply to any organization of musicians pr orchestra. The bill went over till to-morrow,leaving Mr. Plumb's last amendment unacted upon, and the senate resumed consldera- cent. for the month thus far, and at west- tnat anv du'y collected on any of the ern and southern   points   the   gain above described machinery purchased averages about25 percent. Boston re- abroad and imported into the United ports more trade, with easier money. States for the useB above indicated, since At Philadelphia the ehoe and leather January 1,1890, shall be refunded, trades are exceptionally good, but in the    In gluoose the house rate of three groceries trade falls short of anticipa- fourths of a oent a pound is retained. Hons.  Hardware is aotive and firm and    Whereas, the senate provided that the the iron trade improved. Chicago notes sugars BCheeduld and bounty provision a heavy decline in grain receipts, com- waB 10 take effect March 1, next, the con-pared with last year, but a large increase 'erence fixed upon April 1, as the date of in dressed beef, lard, hides and wool, operation with a proviso that No.-3 sugar ana decline in butter and cheeae. may 06 in 'ho meantime refined in bond The dry goods, olothing andboot and withoutduty. shoe trades exceed last year's, with satis- TnE fibst schedule factory collections. In the case of fresh frozen fish from Cincinnati also reports quite a good American usueileb made free by both trade and fair crups, but some pressure houses, the conference has imposed the and a large demand in the money mar- limitation that they must be caught by ket. American vessels in fresh water.  Other At Cleveland trade is good though ore fish are made dutiable at three-quarters 1b inactive, but the demand for finished of a cent per pound, a split between the iron products is unprecedented, and at house and senate rate, Pittsburg it holdB prices firmly though there ie a slight weakening in pig iron. Milwaukee reports trade much In ex- 11indinq twine. On binding twine the rate iB fixed at 7.10 cents but on other manilla oordage the rate is advanced from one and one-half cents to one and three-fourths cents per pound, more than was agreed upon cess of last year's, and Detroit also with manufacturing works fully employed. At Minneapolis lumber has advanced        _______ fifty cents, while wheat is unsettled, with by either house, receipts ot 1,100,000 bushels, and the All of the paragraphs Inserted by the flour output is 170,000 barrels. senate providing for a "customs commis- Kansas City reports a steady trade and sion" were stricken out by the confer- Savannah notes a general activity with ence.   - firm prices for staples. the glass schedule. Though money is very aotive at most ln tnB caae 0,   ,    0 ,,   where tue points and rather stringent at many the Benate reduoed thi rates the confeience volume of business doeB not seem to be ttdo ted a medium flxlniJ ^ ratefl on anywhere curtailed thereby, and the re- BiM* ttDQTe one pjnt'aUd more at one cent ports as to collections are much more d and �Q Bmaller ,i!!Ba down t0 favorable than usual. The great indus- one^uarte'r pintone and one-half cents, tneB.aei reports already cited show, are and 6"n sizes below at fifty cents per gross rio.ilH.wllu nntiva IK. nnnl  mi.niifar.tiit.Aa , ,    , - f    ,� On plain pressed glassware a single rate decidedly active, the wool manufactures having especially improved with much more satisfactory orders. The cotton manufacture is sustained by a large demand for goods, and in numerous minor industries, the expected change of duties ' is said the basis ot greater activity, more firm at Philadelphia and is not of CO per cent. iB adopted, inBtead ot the higher compound house rate, and the same is done in the case of cut and decorated glassware. The 45 per cent, .  , house rate struck out by the senate on t      i   chemical glassware is reinstated.   Sixty iron    I per cent, is fixed for thin and heavy . . .     , c      ... blown glass, instead of 10 and 40, and much pressed for sale here, though some 5 and 4u oompoUud house rates struck Chicago sales in this region are reported, ou^\y tneVnate; and so in toe else but the demand for bar increases with an 0, porc6,aiu glaB8ea a unU-0rm advance in price and the plate and is     eatabliBne*d    inBtead    of !H4?t?If,LmH!,,.a^.?r,�_'rdedi-??'Jl!1 variable     compound     house     rate based    on    size.     On     unpolished ct.se rate the steel rails are still inaotive. Some im- ftTJT.a iL^80Jfrrt.!d,,iria.,i,,�i1,|<=y�n'l6r.crow'iand window glass where T!T i.?L.b.8!� Jj,<.I"id*t,".B.^ I the Benaie made an average reduction of one quarter cent, the conference adopted stocks without a serious decline in prices or any excitement. The business failures occurring during | the last seven days number 219, as com- the medium of one-eighth cent reduction, as well as the senate provision that each box shall contain fifty square feet. Spec- rPe%irg^fTas^ye^eXuSI tecl^na     ^ *T t0. were 192. Lottery "Ads" Must Go. Birmingham, Ala., Sept. 26.-W. P, Plckard, editor and president of the Age-ZforoKoompany, was this morning arrest ed on a warrant charging him with publishing advertisements of the Louisiana rates'run"asfolTows: Lottery company. The United States tive-tentbs cent; below one and one-half Commissioner held that eaoh iBsue since cents, sixty-five one hundredths cents last Friday was a separate offense and per pound; below two cents, eight-tenths pay 66 per cent, instead of fifty cents and 30 per cent, a compromise, tuk 1hon schedules. On pyrites the senate rate of one-bait cent per pound on contained copper is retained. On boiler and other plate iron and steel new grades are established valued at two cents less per pound, on which the Below one cent. put him under a bond of $5,000 to await the action of the grand jury. The bond was promptly given. Only one. copy of the law has so far reached Birmingham, that being in the hands ot the postottlce inspector who swore out the warrant. cent per pound. On higher grades the rates fixed are: Above two cents, one and fou-tenths cents; above three cents, one and flve-tenths cents; above (our cents, two cents; above thirteen . cents, forty-five   per cent. lates thinner than No, 10 are to pay duty on Bheeta. The finer senate guages for hoop iron are adopted, and for railway bars of iron or Bteel the bouse rate of six-tenths of a cent per pound obtained, TIN BCHKDULH. In the caae ot tin plates the houBe rate ot three-quarters of a cent per pound above Bheet iron rates up to July 1 next, and two-tenths of a cent after that late 1b retained. The senate rate of further additional duty nf 35 per cent, on manufacturers of tin plate 1b replaced by an absolute single duty of 55 per cent, and its stipulation for Free sixty-three pound tin after 2890 in oase of failure of domestic works to produce one-third of tho consumption is retained. BTEEL. In steel ingots and blooms the senate rate, lower by one-tenth of a cent, is re tsined. In grades below one cent in value and above that the higher house rate prevails. On iron and steel barB or plates, cold rolled or blued, the highe.- rateB are re taineu. i.umiiek. In the case of sawed boerdsand lumber of white pine, the house recedes from its $1.50 rate. The senate rate of $100 is I adopted and the provisions for the retention ot the old duties to co --- the third Wednesday of February, May. mstrnoted for John j. ingalls. August and November. Permanent offl Lyons, Kan., Bept. 20.-[Special.] - cars were chosen as follows: R. O.Grler Wlllitts and Rightmire were the attrac- ^f V ,rPS�ri5.botrd o' *T �. PW�W��; tion in this city to-day that brought sev- &T^^*$����8.t eral hundred voters together. For weeks George F. Stone of the Chicago board of the Alliance had been moving heaven trade, secretary; F. N. Magdeburg of the and earth through their societies, v> gath- Milwaukee chamber of commerce, treas er an immense crowd and overawe the     r' Melson, the Stallion From Maine, Trots a. Mile In a, 1IH. Kankakee, 111., Sept, 20.-A large crowd witnessed to-day's racing on the kite shaped track of the Kankakee driving park. The weather waB cool and the track perfect. Nelson, the great stallion from Maine, trotted to beat his own record and the world's stallion recorn ot 2:12, and lowered it a half a second, making the mile in 2:11 %. Both the owner ana driver, O. W. Nelson of Watervllle, Me,, were loudly cheered. Audacious Burglars. Kansas City, Sept. 20.-Three auda-olous burglaries were perpetrated in the eastern part of the city in broad daylight this afternoon. Three thieves, two white and one colored entered the house ot H. B. Clark of the Kansas City Hardware company and took $700 worth of jewelry and clothing. They were next heard from at the residence of W. H. Stevens at No. 1001 Prospect avenue. There they secured $600 worth of jewelry. At 702 Woodland avenue atithe house of J. W. English they were ransacking the lower room when the colored coachman hearing a noise in the house looked into one of the windows. One of the burglars took a shot at him but the bullet missed the mark. Officer Trobey beard the shot and arrived on the scene just as the thieves were making their escape. Hegavecbase and captured John O'Brien, alias "Tony Heed the kid," a noted St. Louis thief. The other burglars escaped. Republicans. The Republicans are very well satisfied, thank you, if this is their best. Not only was the crowd a disappointment, but the speech ot Wlllitts much more bo. He said that he was only there so that they might see the next governor of Kansas, deplored the condi- BepobUcau Bally at Ballna. Sauna, Kan., Bept. 20.-A grand Re publican rally was held to-night. Bond's opera house was well filled. Ad dresses were delivered by Hon, T. Dwigbt Thatcher, Superintendent Wl nans, and Attorney-General Kellogg The addresses were well received. � Victorious Mours. Tangier, Bept. as.-The Moorish army has defeated and routed the insurgents in the district of Ait Shokliam. The rebels lost heavily in killed and wounded, and many were made prisoners. All the leaders who were captured were beheaded. Stage Kokbery In California. Riii;i'iN
                            

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