Hutchinson News, September 19, 1890

Hutchinson News

September 19, 1890

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Issue date: Friday, September 19, 1890

Pages available: 4

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Publication name: Hutchinson News

Location: Hutchinson, Kansas

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All text in the Hutchinson News September 19, 1890, Page 1.

Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - September 19, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas 2 HUTCHINSON DVFLY NKW�: FRU>AY Mmknivm SEPTEMBER 19.lfae0. HOW HE WAS CURED. WHY A VIVISECTIONIST MADE UP HIS MIND TO REFORM. B� Panied m Kleht of Horrible SntYerlnff. . Vfinilbaicgt**** Pmctico on film an Ho Hrvd Kxpcrltnentd! Many Tim*** an Dumb Anlnml*-A Mighty Coo J L.le. "I wtu once u viviBoctlonist. bin I ra-formed, or. If you medical gentlemen who believe in it prefer the term, I guve it up several years uyo unci have no de-Biro to resume my investigation!*,'* remarked Dr. 8. K.. Wilflon, of Kentucky, to several fellow practitioners at the Richelieu. "Wh'ile prnetieinff I lived in ft New England town. 1 wim yomitf nnil zealous in the churl*, and it wua not long bo-fore every one within the limits of the county knew of me us a man who tor* tared live ninnmlB to death, and what little praettee i had (lostiuixmBoqueuefl. But 1 had some means, and remained at the village until the oeeuTrenee of the episode which i am about to relate. "1 had been in receipt of many threatening letter* informing me that unless 1 ceaued my cruel pleasure 1 would bo driven nway. But nt the letters i laughed, and to the remonstrances of the prominent citizens of the village 1 turned a deaf ear. "One pitch dark night, having oce.v nlon to visit the drug stori*. I was met on my return by five ittulwort individuals, whose face.s, owing to the darkness, 1 could not wee. 1 win* usked if my namo �was Dr. Wilson, und upon replying in the aflirmad vo I was seized, bound and flung into a wagon. TOnTUIIKO. "After a half hour'a rido we halted by a big barn, inside of which I was carried. A couple of lanterns were lit, under one of which I was stood, while under the others my captors, now masked, grouped themselves. After n mo zaent'a silence one cf them, in a disguised voice, said; �* 'Dr. Wilsou. we have long heard of yon as a vivisectiouist. You pursue yonr investigations in order, yon say, to discover, by observing the Bufferings of one order of animals (sufferings .caused fcy yon), the menus for relieving another order. We think your reasoning sound. * 'We are a gang of sandbaggers who make our living on the highway. We do not wish to kill, but we desire to so silence our prey fin tit enable us to escape �re he Hhail lie able to give the alarm. To ulways do thw neee.si*itaU*3 a knowledge ol just how hard a blow is required to relieve one of Iiim senses. �* -Uf course we might learn in due time frnni experience in our [-.niVssiori, of whirl) I might K-jy we nre new menj-ljer-*. tint th.-it would he unwise fur two reainns Wi* i:,,y;iit at first hit so hard as to kill, or we might nut hit hard ennug'i to knock �i:ir man Heusn It* UtiuJ. A young woman dropped u steel hairpin from her head us she was about to leave an eloctrie car. It lay flat on the floor until �he had alighted and the driver hml turned the current on. Then the hairpin row* and stood on its head. When the imrrent waa turned tff the huwpiti lay dowu: when it was put on again the hairpin would atnud up. The incident afforded amuyentent for the pttBtieugerH.-Alhativ -lminuiL Their **r*l Viall Km*U Bitter CWk Hank tin l)elmonlco's>- Wlwt'A till* yer* uieuiir r*4�u>* kind nr oupt tsoiu1 to try a, Ike' Alkali Ike-You U't" I tfunno wliat \\ U, but I'll rat thr dhUUeily - V�u �nlrhiss negative of the picture Is laid upon this y.inc plate and the two are put together in ttieiuiulUfht What are to he the black lines of the printed drawing are of course white and transparent in the negative. The sunlight goes through wherever the nefxalive i*� trnus-parent, and has the effect of hardening the setiKllized skin I'eneath, so that It cUohs tijihtly to the /.ine. It reu'ilresonly ; one minute to perform this operation. nnAitiis'H nu�M� kinisiiinu, Now the xinu plate Is taken and (riven a coatlUK ever the *en�ltfr.ed *k\tt of lltUott-rapla'rs' ink, rubbed nn with a roller, after which the plate is washed In nil places where the sunlight has not struck the r.ine. m\inn to the oiwicity of the fflasH uejfntivf, the nensitlzed sklu readily washes off, tnyether with ink that covers It. hut elsewhere It ho;>:ier* i:t a mnudt box. To make ihV one of which he fisti*:itvl ii his hook It finepRSHful Ltter;�i\v Vent'irc. Hicks-How did you get along with that stuff you were writing for the paper the other day? Wicks-I sent it to half a dozen papers, and they rejected ft, every one of them. IIleks-Tl::ii was rat her discouraging, eh? Wicks-Not a bit iff it. I just went to work and spelled every ovher word wrong, made a dozen copies, and scut them to as many mag.iziuc.-t as a piece of dialect writing. Hicks-And they rejected it, too? Wicks-You're otT there. They all accepted, and f got a check from each. Hicks-Hut when they come to publish It yoi 'II he in a pretty scrape. \Vi.,:ks- Oh, that'll be all right. Hy the time It is published I shall have been dead years and j 'd or history From making shapes suited to practical J daily uses, l;e:ioty of form and line finish] came also in be considered important as ; the Idea of making vases and jugs for or. nament as well as use grew in favor. Next came t he desire to find a material which should he so strong that vessels made of il would not break easily, and which would he ca| able of taking on a glasu* or polish wh'.:h would add to the beauUy of t he vessels, and make It easv to keep them clean and bright. Also It was desirable to prevent, if possible, the breaking iff orcrumblingof line particles when the vessels were filled with water, as that wab a defect of the soft and porous terra eotta. The eager search after such a material resulted In the vessels of glazed clay, In the manufacture of which the Italian city of Kaenxa acquired great fame, insomuch as the name of Faience ware Is at the present day generally applied to many kluds of earthenware and porcelain vessels. it is prolwible thai the skilled artisans of the Asiatic t rihes knew and practiced th!s art of manufacturing glazed clay many ceiiturfe** Itefore the Florentine workman ami uvtisi, l.ucn Delhi Hnhhla. Hi the end of the Fifteenth century, manufactured the superior white enamel with which he overlaid his beautiful vases. Through his improvements it came about that the large factories in Faeuza for the making of pottery learned to glaze or enamel their viwes in a similar way.-Youth's Companion. simply necnuse it is tnatmceuay ann every body is promenading, ami they wanted a I place to turn around and trip back the | length of State street again. On Saturday tho only person who has serious business I in the book stores is tho man sent out from [ the office of n large newspaper to look up statistics to answer a few of the notes anil queries sent In by its readers.-Chicago Herald. _ Tho Buffalo nnd tho Plalna. When in his westward movement the buffalo came to the semi-civilized inhabitants of the Mississippi system of valleys he brought a great plenty of animal food to the people, who had long been in a good, measure destitute of such resources, fori they had no other domesticated animals save the dog. Not yet firmly Used in the agricultural art, these tribes appear after the coming of the buffalo to have lapsed, into the pure savagery which bunting brings. To favor the pasturage of these.'wjjd! herds the Indians adopted the habit !ofj burning the prairies. These fires spread! to the forests on the east, killing the yontjgi trees which afforded the succession" of; wood, gradually extending the past liraj^ej area of 1 he wild herds until the larger por-j tionsof tlte western phuuseastward to cep irnl Ohm and Kentucky, probably eveni Into the Carolina* ami southward to tliei Tennessee river, had been stripped of their! original forests, making way for the vast throngs of those creatures which ranged; the country at the time when we first; knew it. With the rehabilitation-of the hunter's habit, and with the nomadic con ditlons which this habit necessarily brings,', came more frequent contests between' tribes and the gradual decadence of the slight civilization which the people had acquired.-Professor N. S. Shaler in Scrih-ner's.__ Named Thum After tho Lortl. Old Pete Robinson, who lives at Wor-fihain, V�.., Is a pious negro, who jogged along with his wife for many years, naming a new baby every year, until seventeen unbleached olive branches bore scriptural names. Then came a surprise. Que ' morning.the Presbyterian minister, while taking his constitutional, met Pete. "Good morning, Peter. You seem to be | very much pleased at something." "Yes, sah, I is. You see, de olo 'oman creased de family la3' night.", "Ah, indeed!" "Yas, sah, dar*s two mo' little lam's ov de I>ord." "Indeed! And what will you name them?" "Gwlne name 'em both arter de Z^ord; Kwiue call 'em Messiah and Halloway. "Messiah and Hallowayl Where do you get the name Halloway?" "Hi man! Don't de lord's pm'r say: �Halloway bo thy name?' "-Chicago Her aid. 10B PRINTING Book Making -AND- SPECIALTIES III IDE BOOK BFMMEI1. Jouruals, Ledgers, balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, ( Blank Boobs of all kicks, Land Examiner's Book?* tioan BegtSterfi/.pounty Records, . Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, >yliite Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Real Estate Contract Books, 1 :; :; Attorney's Collection Registers. The1 ttboVe iaonly a partial list of the goods we carry and'tbe work !::."-' would M'tr. 1)110 r.t"'. dncde - WtMV 1 I : dls: piv �� i! i;:t�* � m:.l to �* letok vilhoiit de-s he Saturday at M f|iM�f(*t�ro, Standing in a Iswkstore Saturday alter- | noon one gets nn insight into little fern Uiiue trick* that only weire^ make* liellev-lug. Wtnueii come Iu and ask for hooks that tut lnutk�vUvr ever hwml of and no publisher ever printed And theu they ask for a honk bynutulK'r If they hapnen to striken numlter that (hesaleHiimii can produce they Immediately discover that they have made a mistake and will l� obliged to l a *�i*un:h It Is found The ladv i-i sriuMffs to read a little In this one While lb- salesman wtdw for her decision hi-' rn-* to some one tdse. A* tuvtm r* he ts t. * ; �ueup)etl with the new east mm�r the ta :y thai law asked fur three or four di Terviti bints and fuuiul llielii all delilieratvly i irn- and walks out of the Htnre Why tin they jni the tmtauunu W ' all this trouble an I make no pttruhiuw? | Hive ptock forms, l>ut can make special forms to order, "We guarantee all work and solicit patronage. Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention. Address. NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO.: Hutchinson, l�as. The trouble. "They say the *un never sets on tb� British empire." "Too many bafoneU. I. suppose."- Harper's Bazar. THERMOPYL^. Thfa Is tl)i� place-tha mountain bay Is r. il l *ind i.tcra and trrand. As when -ho Uon held the way That barred hii mother land Look yours and change uad eartbquolcs shouli Have wrought upon the scene; Where once tho sea waves lapped the rook Are meadow lands urown green; Bur. Oeta still looms vast and gray To Mil* the MUhiK sun. And bU)i the mouutalns'tMr (he way, Ami every way but one; The BUlpbur aprlnps still fume and flow Along tho rough ldlblJe, s Anu far off Othrya ve-lWl in snow Sees wbero the Spartan died. There ta a spirit haunu the place Wlmre lu&fity deeds were dared, Thouch time and chang* have iett no tt%o% And notaeravohenpared; And climbing up tho grassy liitl Whem Ki�rta'� boa utood The heart mill answers to the tbrtn That marks (ha hero inoo'L And at 1 read the page agafa, That quickens from t e dust The wlo of tlioM thrtw hundred toe* V.TioiUBdtobeepthelrtnua,  I Lneiv the Ore was not yet lost That nerved my younger �tfe- The aluulow of an eagle vratsed. And fell along my page! -Hurray's Hsgaiitta The Hutchinson Iron Works J. M. THOMSON. Prop. mm mmm form kinds casks ColuBDi, Unieli. 81ra�if. I B��iP�.aB��l','W���h'�> Bw��- �ro�U ta' wy 4Htg� AroMMotiknl1tnglBe^ BiMm Pomp* M* Office and Works. Boaih R&tchiafion, Telephone 18ft ;

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