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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - September 18, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                2 HUTCHINSON DMLY NRW�: TDTESnAY M�HNTNR. SEPTEMBER 18. 1*90. 5) Visitors ;to] tho Fair ondithe Public in general Attention! If you desire Fashionable LatejStyle -r:.. CLOTHING G-oto^ it The Hub!' Our stock of Fall and Winter 0 lothing excels anything ever before exhibited in this city. DON'T THROW Your Money Away Buying trash, but call and Bee our richly tailored and good fitting garments, and if we don't save you at least 25 We won't ask you to patronize us, For reliable Men's and Boyt.' Clothing! -AND- Owing to my R emoval to No. 14 North Main  Street THEO. NATHAN, Grain. Dealer, 348 Exchange Building, Kansas City, Mo. HigheBtjiricoB paid for Corn and Oate. Liberal advanceB made on consignments.  Correspondence solicited. Next Door to the Brand I Will Make Specially Low Prices on Furniture for a Few^Days.  Call and see me. H. W. W1LLETT, NO. 4 SOUTH MAIN STREET. STATE (IF BTJDDHISM. WHY THE ORIENTAL RELIGION CAN NEVER MAKE HEADWAY. Gome direct to the Greatest Bargain Givers of the age, Leaders of Leaders. Opera House/jcorner Ut Are and Main St. It In N�t in Accordance wltli the l*ro-gr �Hlv' Spirit of tho Ago-The llud-fltiUt I  ran tin'.: for the saI-:eof argument, that there nr.* in Europe and America a million persons who incline toward thU form of religion, which inculcates a gnat deal t hat is adiuiiahle and true in morals, we shall vet lie v.sry Car Ii'Mn that, sweepiui: conversion to i lie do^uHJs of the India/) mes.-iab which bis admirers predict. It isstrnnge to note in thin connection thai while a small faction of Christianity desires to convert the world to Buddhism, there has been a mowing sent im�ut in .Japan, u Huddhisi vmvmvy, that Chrisuanity is greatly preferable, and that the Japanese would "lo wyll to discard their undent, non progressive faith and adopt its rights and pimct ices. Buddhism in the faith of perhaps* 5W.00O. OOU pi/I'm mis, Inhabiting Burma h. Siain, Ounbodia, Cochin China, Ceylon, Auam, Tniupiin, Thiher, this Chinese empire and Japan There are none in llindo^tan, the country where Cautama, the father of tho taith, was horn some mx) years* before Christ, his followers ail having peished ia it persecution that took place- about tho commencement ot the- Christian era. thk ni:i>i>msT hjj:a. Tho life of Buddha is the keynote of tho belief uf hJH followers. The son of i; powerful rajah, married ton beautiful woman and .surrounded by every luxury, he left his home on account of the impression made on him by tho evidences of human misery that he saw about him, ami lived thenceforward the life of an ascetic, his only elTorf being to extinguish in his breast every human desire and passion. To his mind the chief end of existence was tho nttainnieut of "nirvana," a state of perfect repose, which could not generally be uc compllsbed till after death He recognized no (Jod us a separate ludng, his theory of the universe being pantheistic, not a soul separate from the body, though every hu man beinu laid before his present life passed t hrouuh a -series of existences, which after his death would be continued to all eternity This thei>r> of the ir;:;is migration of souls lor of existence-Minis neni bo some years past in favor among bin ii isi> TKe morality of Buddhism in its ascetic form i> naturally above suspicion lint what chance m tIns swiftly moving age, when everything i* on lire, ha-* a religion which involves conventual iuaet ivity, and has for its chief cud, its ideal of happiness, the nn'vam^astuteof perfect repose, which Is equivalent to mental death or physical annihilation)' Could anything he more foreign to the American habit of thought and act ion? Buddhism it* Inferior to Christianity not only in that it is mi progressiva, inn in that It is highly personal and selilsh. Tho gov erning motiveof the Buddhist is to purify atul save himself Tho leading idea of Christianity isdoing, good toothers The difference is vital, since every living gen eration bus as its be tie lice nt task to create a new world for that which Is to follow. "Save fyonrselfl'' is the cry of Buddhism, "Save mhentf" (* the cry of Christianity, �ml when we bay Christianity we mean not those merely who regard themselves as its orthodox representatives, but nil who in to called Christian countries acknowledge what faith has doue tor the world, ami ao-cepl Its principles in general, without putting implicit faith In all its dogmas. A TlliKKKIl'a OPINION A Paris reporter  short time ago thought it would be n sensible thing to interview IIciiuu, one of tho accepted oraclea of human thought, on the threatened Invasion of Buddhism The greJit philosopher and moralist took the matter seriously and practically He acknowledged the admirable moral theories that the system bad given to the world, but regarded its excessive gentleness and resignation, its horror of blood. Its asceticism, it* illumtmv ttoux.ihH tending to demoralize and destroy the race The nations vowed to the faith were dead pnlitleally and morally Borne ot t lu-m were swept away by the Tartar in-vm*inti* Those which remain, in which Buddhism may nimost lie said to lie a state religion, and that does hot include, China and Japan, amount to nothing Therv Is nothing In Buddhism which corresponds with the temperament nf any western nation of this epoch, which Is uti for action, and baa no ftvmpathy with the (*erfit;i repose of the nirvana Ax lo thetrunsudgrationor the passage of beings reuiining something of th** human form from star to star, the philosopher's ideas wetr not of that wuu-deriiiM character and be luul ootlmeto discus** wuch a vugaUuid theory II hanlly needed the opinions uvea of a thinker ho profound and so practical aa Itauuu towuvi�c**uyiMrtwibl� m�i� ir. too worm is ever to return to nuituiusm It is not just, at this epoch. There is nothing in the spirit of the age to encourage its followers to persist in the attempt at conversion. The world is just now too busily occupied to accept any form of faith that is purely reflective. In Europe the couditiou of tinned t ruce offers no vantage ground to abstract thought. There is not only the rivalry at homo to fill tho minds of government and people, but a colonial policy that takes up all their spare time and rounds out their sphere of action. As for ourselves, there Is so much to do, so much to develop and complete, that we seem just at the cotnmeucemeti', of our national enrrvr. Tho period for the whole world is one of hope, ,:iot of despair. JCv erywhere. nations atul people are looking forward, not backward. Mo doubt the world will pass, at some future day, through � period of pessimism, when it will seek, as it docs not seem inclined to at pre.-coi, the consolations oJ' religion. Then the nirvana may have some consolations to offer to the discontented and disappoint ed who will be in the majority. It hag ixo chance now.-.Sun Francisco I-Jxi'iuiucr. llu Was Usuri to It. .Mi- Wiekivin-J/yougo yu;i will wan fur mo oh tho other shore, won't yon d ears' Mr   Wick wire- 1 .suppose I  novel went anywhere yet without h:-, .I:.-; to wail fur vou ut h-ast bulf jtn hour.- Ksehan^o MINK   FARMING. Profit and Knjoyuicnt In Raining the I.lttlo Fur Hearers. My father had at one time thirty mink, mostly of his own raising, and they were as tame and easily handled as so many kittens, but the decline in furs, and consequently of our enthusiasm iu the enterprise and our subsequent removal to Tennessee, put an end to tho experiment. We lost a number, I remember, toward the last by feeding them too much beef's liver. The Utile iminialsi were exceedingly fond of liver, and we throw into the yard ouo day n whole beef's liver, ou which they gorged themselves for several days. This brought on a kind of dysentery, of which a good many died. We also lost a number from no cause that wo could ascertain, but which 1 now believe was from keeping too many confined in too small a space. Tho mink is a solitary animal by nature, and when too many are by force congregated It brings on contagious diseases among tbem. Our enclosure was at first about four or five rods square, and surrou nded by a clump of small spruce trees, and bad a stream of water constantly running through it in a box about a foot wide and the same depth. Later we found that the animals had to be separated moat of the year, for they are vicious lighters, especially the old ones, and thus the it closure was divided up into small compart nents. The outside was an upright light board fence six feet high, rest ing on a stone wall one foot below the surface, with Hat stonrst at the bottom, projecting in, also with n board n foot wide, projecting inward from the ton, and the corners load with tin Then to insure their not dim! ing out we used to clip t lie two front nails of the forepaws If this is dune when : he animal Is young, ami the nail clipped cose up-that is, taking off theeydof the toe with it-it wi)J not be likely to grow out again, and this quite effectually spoils the animal's ability as a climber or digger- As a boy it was my part of the farm chores to hfok after tho "iniukery," and an agreeable duty it was t� me in many ro-Bpects. The fe.;d consisted almost entirely of woodchucky, in which our section of western New York abounded, and many an afternoon the excuse of being out of "miuk bait" was sufflcieut to let me off about milking time, and many a poor wooden tick fell a victim to my little smoothbore at short range. The young oneH were fed mostly on milk, tapping it up greedily liku young puppies. A young mink Is easily tamed, and they are the most cuto and playful ifttle creat urea in the world. They will play together ; for hours at a lime, rolling nod tumbling } over each other in the water and out In the | most amusing manner. They were sociable and friendly, and seemed delighted when I came into the yard to see them. They would crawl alt over me, and up my coat sleeve and pantaloon legs, and let me feel of their sharp, needle like teeth without offering to bius.# I have seen tLem rolling and tumbling "in the -water, when one would st retch out and appear to be dead, and the other h-jIm him by the uupe of the neck and drag him out of the water and several feet out on the ground, when the "dead" mink would suddenly jump, ami they would both scramble into the water and reverse the performance. lake all meat eating animals the mink would gorge themselves with enough at one time to last thetti two or three days, and during such periods they are stupid and qub-i, spending most of the time asleep, ami when handled will lazily open their eyes and stretch out and go to sleep again But let them once get fairly hnn gry and they uiv about us lively u varmint ns I ever saw At smli times it is bust to Ih� careful nlmut feeding them bits of meat from your hand, for they are liable in grab hold of your linger instead, and then a mink will beat any bull terrier that ever lived t-i the nuttier uf lutu^-in;; on, and a dnz n 11.  is runnoi do as lively snarling and -i;:.;    Vi>'j cry swing them ar.iu! ii;ei.> ,   m.i; I the fence ot !ue   i        i i erlmeut wtui> some such medium for a month or two mouths, as the case may be. The uptown barbers, therefore, look for a boom in this branch of their business The rapid Increase in bald beads nmong the youth of the metropolis is strikingly noticeable. The precise causes, beyond the too constant wearing of close fitting huts, have not vet been definitely fixed, but the bald fucV obtains public importance because it accounts for the bachelorhood of hundreds of ani:-ii'le men who would make loving husband- and devoted fathers, 'tho email coterie alluded to, however, disavow any matrimonial motive in their club project. They assert t hat they have lH:en impelled toward it by the annoyance which thiy experience iu the increased reference to bald heads made upon the burlesque stage. The per.-.istence of the busy house fly, nevertheless, may have something to do with it. An ill naturcd hairdresser, by the way, stated recently that comparative baldness among women, and especially society women, is no longer an uncommon thing, nnfi that the number of ladies who sleep in one part oftheir chamber while their hair, except a small tuft, reposes in another is increasing in a most awkward manner. In regard to their luxurious tresses, there Is no doubt that the hairdresser is more in tho confidence of the society woman than is the society woman's husband. But there Is no clanger of a. buldheaded woman's club ever Hurting a place in New York.-Xew York News. Out In Washington. "I was in Sprim:fieJd, the state capital, }ou know,ami hiAing a few hours tospare decided to ride out to Lincoln's tomb. Down there the dd fashioned si root cars arc propelled by eld fashioned miih'.-t, and you ;:re never v. hirled along the road fast enough fo get m,:' ick. After riding the O'm [;.*!-about two bluci'.s-I walked to V.iiv bmv of the i ay '.*) deposit my tare. Uu conscinn.-ly 1 put a five-dollar bill in the receiver When 1 realized my mistake I spoke to i he driver. "'I put tuotv than my favtt lu the box,' said I. '* 'Well, that's too had!' " 'Will you givt- me the change?' " 'Nope. You'll have to lota Uie change. 1 haiu't got no key to the box.' "'Well the live' - "'What's thiu?' quickly spoke up the driver. 'Did you put fl-v-e regular dollars In the box?' "'Certainly; you can see the bill.' " 'Well, jce-whia, wait till we get to the barn and I'll give you this nigh inula Hain't seen that much since the election.' "And do you know," concluded the colonel, "I came Very near returning to Chi-CHgo with a mijJe, but I fimiljy got my change."-Spokane Spokesman. A St run co Bulcfdu. Ono of the most extraordinary cases of suicide In the unuals of self destruction (s reported from Austria, where a regular epidemic of suicide wems to exist. JJeuL Mnngaslus, of k'lausonburg, one of the most popular officers in the Austrian army, Is the victim of this queer freak, while his bosom Triend and messmate is a murderer, yet not guilty of the crime The last time MangasiitH went to the barracks where his company w�**juurUTed, justa fen* minute* before his tragic taking off, he was observed to be u^oDt minded and much depressed In spirits. He talked with his messmate for a few minutes and then went to a room where a number of new magazine rifles were kept, Jih'irlffl one, returned and handed jt lo J)is frieurt, Haying*. "Take this ride and let me see If yo'i can uim It properly Point at my eye." The soldier bud no idea the weapuu "ras lauded, and obeying the words "make icady/' "preseut," *'flroH'* he discharged the rifle at u dlstauce of three ynri.'s into the oflicer'n eye,' The bullut weut thiouyU the skull and death wuHin-stan tun eon h. lie left a letter for his captain saying tuut the soldier who shot him was innocent.-Sl Louts Itcpubba tti  the i'aci thai tho necessary signals an* made by elect ric currents set in motion by discs, or (dugs, or pros buttons, are to a certain extent inefficient^ as they allow of the possibility of a false register being made while the employee is absent. 'I'he instimgraph, bow-ever, by making an autograph at a particular moment of time necessary, minimizes the possibility of fruud.-New York Sun.___ Telling Time by riowera. There is not an hour of the day that U not the beloved hour of some blossom, Lin mens, the celebrated hu tan's t, con* ccived the, pleasant notion of a flower clock. Instead of a rude metal ladl to thump the hour tiiere is a little flower bell ready to oiwii ut 3 o'clock, a flower star that will shine forth ut 4. and a flower cup, perhaps, will appear at 5 o'clock to remind old fashioned folk ihut it U near tea time. Claude Lorraine, although he did not, like Linuunis, make a clock of four and twenty (lowers in bis garden, was a landscape puiliter most familiar with nature, aud when he was abroad he could at any time know what o'clock it was by asking the time of the flowers of the Held.-Detroit Frcu Press, Dane (tie In a Gov torn in en t ttulldlng A strange scene was enacted at the weftt end of the posto.Tlce building one Sunday ul^hl about 0 o'clock. A lot of boys and gills, some thirty iu all, hud gathered there to play in id have it good time, when oue of the kids took out a umuth organ und started ou a *|g lo a second two girls of the age of H liS years Jiimpod into the can ter uf the sidewalk tinj commenced to dance to tilt* muni a Tho kids ibeu form** a rUut wound        � -�* 19 aad 21 East Sherman Street. DOES A GENERAL TOB PRINTING Book Making -AND- Book Binding Business. SPECIALTIES IH THE BOOK DEPiBTUl Journals, Ledgers, Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinkB, Land Examiner's Bookc tiO&D Eegisters, County Records, Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Keal Estate Contract Books, Attorney's Collection Registers. The above is only a partial list of the goods we carry and the work we are prepared to execute promptly, We are making a specialty of Magazine Book Bindingl and we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles and at lewest prices. "We wiah the public to understand thai we are ready and prepared to execute any kind of Printing or Book Work! Have ptock forms, but can make special forms to order. We guarantee all work and solicit patronage. Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.   Address, NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO.: Hutchinson, Kas. Novel fiocnle I2flWt�. An ingenious device has lieen adopted at the Hippodrome, in Paris, for the production of scenic effects In the central oval space, without the spectators opposite l>e-ingseeuat the same time. An elllptlcul screen of line sUiel netting is lv\ down in comparative darkness, so a� to be about twelve feet iu Ivoul of the benches. Thin Is painted on the Inner side with any do-sired scene, and as it Is strongly illumi tinted at a given moment from the center a spectator from any point has an excelluut view of the scene wjtuoui seeing anything of the crowd Uiyoud.-Now York Com-oierciul Advertiser       , Could Culy Half See. Parent-C'un 1 g-*t thin uoy into the clr-ens tit half price!- Ticket Seller-Of counw you can't. Th� boy is ovtr 15, ain't be? pnreut-Ye*, but he'tt blind In oue eye.- America. Thr.KOod rmmit �Ut� are Virginia, North Carolina and Teunessefl The crop lo h good year amount* to ulwiut h.oou.ooo bushels, or TU.OOtUKKt pounds, bavin�grown to the** proportion* from an output of 1�m than eou.OUO bushels Iu ItfiU J. M. THOMSON, Prop. KSTIMAT^ FURNISHED FOR ALL KINDS CAST1NGE Uohunu, Linleli, OlrJen, I fttMoi^'BMli Weight*, Bouic' fronto tn< my dttlfft AroWt�on;r�l Iron Work �tprokltj. *i�|tUM�, Steam Pumps and kU Claw* Haobtimry Bcpalfd. Batiiiactioc guanuleedj 01 re me a sail. Office and Works, South Hutchinson.    Telephone 186   

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