Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Hutchinson News Newspaper Archive: July 15, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Hutchinson News

Location: Hutchinson, Kansas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - July 15, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                HI'TfflrTTNRON 1>ATLY NFWR* TUESDAY MORNING. JULY 16,1890. A FAIR PARE SPOTTER THE WAY A WOMAN DETECTS DISHONEST CAR CONDUCTORS. Dm m B�u>*jrkaJble Mamury r,r >u tutor*-Bh� Always P�y* Her Pare and Klda* with niSkrcnt Ku-Tha W�jr Volleotor. of Vmm C�o Cheat. I net a female potter and wau surprised tu learn to 'What an extent this system of espionage is carried on by the principal homo car lines in the city. The young woman detective with whom I earoo in contact wob an exceedingly prepossessing looking girl, quietly dressed in a gray cloth gown, with small ronnd fast to watch. "Oh, the queer things I see and the queer things I do," she quoted laughingly, with a pretty gesture of perplexity. "My varied experiences would fill a good sized volume. But como up to my rooms while I talk. My hours are from 11 to i, so as it is now G o'clock I am at liberty until to-morrow morning." She led the way up to a small flat in West Fifty-sixth Btrect, furnished in a dainty, inexpensive manner, with evidences of a refined xnind and cultivated tllHtc. "There'h only my mother, myself and ono big cat," she explained, and a jolly looking little dumpling of a woman came forward to greet us. .She was evidently mi anient admirer cf her daughter's prowess and capabilities. IIANOEIt OK DIHCOVERY. "We sit hero and laugh by the hour after I get homo over my day's adventures-don't we, mother?" she rattled on. "Do you find it tedious or mind the pot.it ion it places you in?" "Why, not a bit. I've become so used to it now. Let me see, U'h three years since I first began, and I haven't been found ont yet. Of course it requires a great deal of tact and watchfulness to be able to go over the Bame road day after day and not bo suspected by the different conductors, but I am very careful not to get on the same car more than once a day, though occasionally, if 1 take, Bay, car 41) down in tho morning 1 can board tho same one coming back at night, thus giving the impression that I havo been down town to business all day." Sho said she made a point never to start at tho beginning of tin) road nor to end nt. the terminus. "1 havo been engaged in this work no long now," she continued, "that 1 can toll at a distance whether my right car is coming or whether 1 havo been a passenger on it once before that day." The road officials always employ men as spotters daring the early morning hoars and later in the afternoon, the traffic during those portions of the duy being greater than at any other times, but in respect to the danger of discovery the intermediate honrs, when tho car takes on comparatively few passengers, are really tho most risky. "Are yon an expert?' "Well, yes, they do call me an expert, but I wns dreadfully nervous at first and painfully conscious. Every time the conductor looked at mo I expected to soe tiui walk up, put his hand on my shoul-(, vr and tell mo that he knew just what e readily Been that the water of receding waves will flow into it with similar effect, to that of water going over a fall, and that a person standing near is very likely to be drawn over with it, and thus, if the ditch is deep enough, carried out of his depth. This is all there is to tho much talked of "under tow" and the numerous accidents laid to its account.-Dufiield Osborne in Scribner's. lien nl. hint, hut; then it was plcn.*iiut ami restful to lean again;;! yuuv mighty t'raim:. I quite gave myself up to it, and grew and grew, and budded mul blossomed, till, asyon know, the passers-by stop in amaromont, saying, "How beautiful that fire escapo looks!'" "&till ours U not a suitable union," persisted the flro escape. "I have a great mission to perform; I am here to save human life. You thould have cast your lot In with some nice country cottage-not a coarse old tenement like me." "Love gocth whither it ia Bent," sighed the vine meekly, and clung closer. That night a woman with a babe at her breast dropped a lighted lamp. Flames darted here, there, everywhere, hungrily, gloatingly. People madly flnng their poor possessions from the windows. Kngiues rattled through tho streets. Bravo men climbed the sturdy fire escapo, and carried children and women down its iron sides. Splendid streams of water played upon the blazing bnildiug. Morning dawned, pale and blue. The tire escape stood tall and dark, but the poor, pretty little vine lay dead at its feet, a victim of misplaced affection. -Pearl Kytinge in Dramatic News. I, �al ;fiuch 4root, d into y than '4 'a couple 3cond and n to detect ^ureful. �y marriage engagement ,    as been broken olr boar**! hidy ii.sideutally re-rji f friend \if hens win 4y on tlie mandarin. Shi a* tidolin, of course, but tin Bfittu oouJd not forget and for :,ho might, utter marriage, lv .1 ��' 8Deau' �' " saw* instead of i Cimti of Knmom l't-cm-limcu. Robespierre and Marat are enigmatical characters. Their deeds were horrible, but tho casts of their heads taken after death are of ineffable sweetness, [u both the cerebral development is poor, particularly in t lie coronal region. The skulls, each of which goes up into a point, may have pressed there on the brains. Phrenological development, or liiok of development, taken with facial traits, betokens ill balanced minds. Marat's face, in David's portrait of htm, is in all but complexion that of a rod Indian. Robespierre's sister, on the other hand, is sweet, serene, pensive aud of a lovely purity of expression. Charlotte Corday, according to Dun-lonx, ono of her portraitists, wasarather good looking yuiing woman, ruoro the peasant than the lady. .She had a hard, quick, willful glance. Tallica was another ill balanced creature. He had the profile of an Egyptian dog god.-Contemporary Review. Uablmsc Mr. Babbago took mo one day to see his calculating machine, and was mightily amused at my emphatic appruval. I never could do my sums, and asked him to give it to me.   He also showed me a wonderful automaton figure, made, if I recollect right, of silver.  He called it his wife, and 1 was rather afraid of tho silent lady as she moved her arms and head in a graceful but rather weird fashion.   Mr, Babbago generally looked || J-| so sad that I remember when my grand-f r1*! mother was telling me the story of Pyg-*W*fJ;malion 1 exclaimed, "Why, it is just iko Mr. Babbago and his wife."   My parents and ho qnito agreed on one sub--dislike of music-which my father always described as "a noise which prevents   conversation." - Mrs.  Ross   in Murray's Magazine. WHAT YEAR  IS THIST .of  In1� Trying to Determine Iu What > Clirlat Wan Born, n professor sayu onr caleu-Christian orj ia erroneous." tl�fy)ovo item going tho rounds, lino which mceily in-that wo aro otf four oi mode nf reckoning time. > h.-ia been douut ua to tits aoceptod culcnJUv iuu era.  Learned hia- �*m:li Idea, or HewardlnK- Merit. 1 should like to answer a question which I am constantly being asked: "How is it that tho French, who are such admirers of pluck, adventure, the advancement of Bcience, otc., notonly do not lionize Stanley, but even give him tho cold shoulder?" Far be it from me to reply that tho French do not recognUe tho great feats of this great explorer; but they are a sentimental people, and whon they see a man of this kind make, financially, a good thing out of his exploits they consider that ho has his Toward, and they cannot bo made to see where the bands of music and hat waving come in. If Cincinuatns had been a Frenchman ho would be a saint in tho eyes of the French; but a Wolseley in enjoyment of gold and title would never be considered to need niche or pedestal in addition. If M. Pasteur had charged a guinea every time he inoculated a patient nobody would havf objected; nay, it would have been thought quite right and natural; but ho would not have been regarded as entitled to hero worship. It is because M. Pasteur is known never to have taken a cent for liimself from his patients that he is idolized by his eouutryuieu. They admire in him a benefactor of the human race, and it. flatU-rs their pride to claim him as a product of French soil. Call tlus sentimentality if yon will, I am neither commending nor condemning it, but stating the plain fact.-Max O'Rell in Washington Star. The Value of a Kilrer Dollar. Senator Jones, of Nevada, was twitted by Senator McPherson, of New Jersey, in the course of bis silver speech with the fact that the silver dollars were only worth seventy-two cents. Of course it "reminded him of a little story." "I recollect," said ho, "talking on this subject once with some senators iu tho cloak room. During tho conversation one of the senate pages brought mo a telegram, ou which he said the tele graph messenger had told him thero were fifty cents due. I gave the i>age a silver dollar and said to him: ' 'I have been informed by some very respectable and intellectuiU gentlemen in here, .some of them candidates for the presidency even, that this dollar is worth only seventy-five cents. I do not want to cheat a little boy. Take this out, aud if the lw\v thinks it is worth only seventy-rive eenU lie can send me back tweuty-tive cents, and if be thinks it is worth n dollar he can send me back fifty cents. 1 will leave it to him.' 'The page brought back fifty cents aud said the telegraph boy told him he did not know what those old duffers' in there might say, but it was as good a lollar as he wanted and was very hard to get."-Cor. New York Tribune. liurglur. CHUght Iiy Klectricity. Electric burglar catching has received an impetus in Paris at the hands of an enterprising wino merchant iu tho Rue Secretun, who has just landed his fifth man in the following way: Thero is no concierge for his premises, and he lias had his store connected with the room occupied by his waiters by means of an electric wire. When the biirglar enters the bell in the waiter*.' room rings and Ihe intruder is quietly nabbed. Tho wine merchant's experiment has been so successful that several other traders iu the vicinity have adopted his modus operandi, and are now yearning for n real livo "midnight marauder" to come their way.-Exchange. Velocity of the I'lJ � A physiologist in France has been observing the work of flies in flying, and somehow has arrived at tho conclusion that the wings of a fly make about 830 beats per second, and that such a fly can travel at tho rate of a kilometer per minute. This is equal to tho velocity of an express train. Assuming this to be so, then a fly could compass the earth's circumferenco in twenty-eight days.- Exchange. Tenuity fur Adulteration. Severe measures have recently been taken by the Russian government against adulteration and the salo of injurious sub-stantra as food. Persons convicted of these oifcnses will be liable to a fineof 300 rubles (iM-S)or to imprisonment for threo months. For a si^cond offense these penalties will isi doubled, and a third conviction will ennui the lossof civil and political rights. .Mr. liriglit's doctrine of caveat, emptor evidently lluds no favor in the eyes of the i7itr. Our own "free nuri enlightened" eouutry might with advantage take a hint li'tim audi truly lienovolent despotism.- Chicago Herald. HORRORS  IN  DAHOMEY. flhoukliig. ThliiKK Dr.  ISnyol iaw-Flend-l�h Anittxonf. A letter from Paris, giving details of tho adventures of Br. Bayol, the governor of Kotonou. who wm imprisoned by ihe king 6t Dahomey, appears in The Vossische Zeitnug. Dr. Bayol himself was not ill treated, but was forced to witness the most horrible executions, and was closely watched night and day by three of the most Important chiefs. He was forced to bo present at the exe-cntion of his secretary and his interpreter, and was a spectator of tho sacrifico at one time of eighty-four human beings, aud at another of forty-two. The victims were bound, mutilated in a horrible manner, and then, still alive, hung up by the heelB. Then their bodies were opened with largo round knives and tho intestines taken out, after which the corpses were thrown into ft "placo of skulls." where in forty-eight hours they were- reduced by birds of prey to skeletons. Dr. Bayol was every time compelled to view each corpse, while tho oxecu-tloners carefully turned the heads of their victims toward him. Upon one occasion he desired to buy off some negroes, whom ho recognised as proteges from Porto Novo, but the king angrily refused to allow it. Every day his dusky majesty danced before the doctor, executing steps and jumps which would have been highly entertaining under other circumstances. At these times tho king wore sandals and a sort of Grecian. cap on his head, and six Amazons danced with him. The Amazons Dr. Bayol describes as very fiends. One day the doctor witnessed a spectacle which he will never forgot. At a sign from the king 500 Amazons rushed upon a living ox and tore it into pieces in a few seconds; then each, with a piece of raw flesh in her mouth, marched off singing, while five of their number held tho akin and head of their victim aloft in triumph. In festal garments they witnessed from tho roofs of the neighboring huts the human sacrifices of the next day and laughed heartily. They always appear perfectly resigned and go quietly to death when their turn comes. The king is very suspicious, and would not sign the letter written to the president of the French republic. Dr. Bayol's return to the eoa*t was; extremely dangerous, for lie had no passport anil was therefore obliged, in spite of illness, to march more than fifty miles in one day through country with which he was quite unac mminteil. On arriviu:; at Kotonou he heard of the death of the king, whom had he been still at Dahomey, ho would havo probably been accused of poison ing. ____ Wleked Trick on a Trout Flxher. J. H. Blethen and Alfred Stetson, of Linneus, went ou a fronting expedition and captured eleven fish. They placed them in their wagon aud then went oft* to look after some boar traps. While they were gone Dr. Boyd happened along and recognizing the team proceeded to purloin the trout. He took them to Mr. Blethen's house, told Mrs. Blethen how he came by them, and requested her to say nothing, but to cook them tho next day and surprise her husband; mean time she would probably hear a pretty good fish story, ho predicted. Whei Mr. Bletheu arrived homo his story, in reply to his wife's inquiries as to his luck-was fully up to the expectation of the plotters. He said they had caught forty-eight, trout, and most of them were of monstrous size, in fact the finest string he ever saw, but some evil minded person had stolen them from the team while they were absent, and so on When his wife produced eleven fried little fishes for dinner the next day and told him that there were his forty-eight monsters tho fisherman wilted like morning glory in a noonday sun.-Houl-ton {Me.) Pioneer. Senior Kee|i* ou Writing. My mother often went to Bowood, and used to tell :t good story against our old friend. Mr. Nassau Senior. Onco when she was thero with tile Seniors and a large party Tommy Moore, who lived near and Mas a frequent visitor, was pre-vailed upon, to sing. All prepared to listen to the charming performance save Mr. Senior, who sat. down at a small writing table and began to writ* with quill upon Lord Lansdowue's very ribbi paper. He was compiling a paper on statistics, or something of fliat sort Moore began, but his singing was reu dered impossible by the persistent scratch, scratch, aud ho tnmed round to seo who caused the odious noise. Mr Senior looked up and said innocently, "Oh, you don't disturb me i assure you pray gooif, I rather like it.' This caused on outburst of laughter / >bsolntely puzzling to the unconseioDi statistician.- Mrs. Ross in Murray's jiagazine. man are. tj auu a great i wiin au a over it; With its lines and points-an is my custom-fie shall only ; write 'The Admiral,' �whatever title the king may have conftrrednpon him." The Tisrutl forth of this signature, with 'its lines and points" as mentioned in the will, was as follows: .a ,8. A .8. Ill Y Xpo FEREN8-El Amirante Why the periods were used at the sides of the Se and not \>eloxo arid following the other lottom has been the Bubject of much discussion. The initials in a straight line are "8. 8. A. H. X. M. Y.," which Professor Beoher, recalling tho fact that it was to Isabella or Ysabella that Columbus owed his chances of carrying out his plans, reads them as: "Serv-iodor Sus Alteza Sacras Jesus Maria Isabel." Which wonld bo about as follows it translated into good United States English: "The servant of their sacred highnesses Jesus Mary and Isabel." The last line Professor Dewitt translates as "Christ Bearing (Christopher) the Admiral."-3t. Louis RopTiblic. A llleuk J'roiintiet. Bill Collector (authoritatively)-1 wish to nee Air. Neverpay immediately. Shrewd Servant-Yon can't seo him now. \Ho's gone to lied so wo can wash his tlarinel?.-New York Weekly. ^ /rite I'iro Ktoauo anil the VLue. "Very fixilish to cling to mo. Su(>-pi)6o an accident were to happen, whore vould you lie? Torn, trampled, crushed under hurrying feot. Look at thoeo suniiowcra. They Bland oa their own stems, thoy do. Catch them sticking their saucy yellow heads between my bars; not lunch! I like mdepenilence, I do." Thus spake tho lire escape. "How hard hearted yon urol" murmured the viuo, singing a tendril lov ingly above tho upper railing. "I was born so," replied tho fire escape, grimly. "And bow coldl" continued the vine. "My uatnre," growled tho fire escape. "But 1 love you," ivhispered the vine, -because- you are so strong and eo tall and such a help to mul When I waa a little thing, and u stranger in this street, I dark, iTiicnnig namosi tome wry. cajii. %�ro that when one of khe topaaea won los* you looked so terrible, and, if yon will from the brooch not loos agoU could not pardon i'c, n uiyy. ihat I waa twMt  Ifaatchcd here. t'"*lH>va Vnhold the I>an. At Weuilovor, Wy. T., there are about iu cowboys iu camp. No DlUi-ers are lo-Uil there, but the teeu are held iu rt> ruiul by sell respect and the onlurs of ,eir employers. One of the punchers . ile a saddle, lie was captured red uand-1, f,t.rlp[�eil on llio bunks of the l'uuui and eeived twenty lushes on the bare back ith a heavy whip. Then he was paddled itli u board. The cowboys i�re deter-.inisl to uphold the dignity of tho law.- .xclmnge.     ^_ The Unsentimental Lover. She- Don't worry about your iuoome, mar.  I eon live on love, ile-Von wou't thiuk soaffca-your father -ins hoarding in* -K.t�"1i, a ou lyjius lady, Mum Cora Forbes, ha* tn her (wssession a very valuable set of v~v tumi;, uuu� eiraugcr ui tins nurcuv #,.;,,,, ,  i     *r *   , mZZ , looked nn and saW von urxat ami It, fl"4^ Porliapstheonly ouesof their W0K6U up ana saw } on, great and ..^a lu Mt maatrj: The^ a ' rk, reaching almost to the airy. AM. W that whon one of khe tonuses won lost The Land ut Dueki. There are more ducks in the Chinese empire than in all the world outside of it. They are kept by the Celestials on every farm, on tho private roods, ou tho publio roads, on the streets of cities and on all the lakes, ponds, rivers, streams aud brooks in the country. Every Chi nese boat also contains a hatch of them. Thero are innumerable hatching establishments all through the empire, many of wluch are said to turn out about, fifty thousand young ducks every year. Salted and sinokod duck and ducks' eggs constitute two of tho most common and important articles of diet in China, -Exchange. Critical 1'orludo in 1.11... There are two perioils of life iu wluch the powuisof resistvuice to adverse influ ences aro excessively weak. In infancy from birth to 5 years of age, but especially in tho first year of existence, the power of life is very feeble, and this is the reason that no many infants die suddenly iu convulsions. Again, after tile ago of 115 is passed the vital tcuacity lowered, tho substance of the heart am of tho muscles iu general becomea fatty aud there ia imminent liability to sud dot failure of the heart's action.-Chat-tor. C'uriouu bl?uatu*-e �f Coltimbut. Of tho si-Tty odd >-i.l.ious<<
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication