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Hutchinson News Newspaper Archive: May 9, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Hutchinson News

Location: Hutchinson, Kansas

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - May 9, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                Don't Fail to Visit the HE BIRTH OF AN ISLAND HOV/ A RECENT ADDITION WAS MADE TO THE TONGA GROUP. Opposite Hotel Midland, Where can be seen all the latest ideas in Queens ware, China, Porcelain and White Granits, Both Plain and Decorated. Dinner Sets, Chamber Sets, Water Sets, Bread and Milk Sets, Ice Cream Sets Lemonade Sets. We respectfully call the attention of Confectioners Grocers, etc., to our line of Candy Jars^Trays, etc. We can furnish anything pertaining to our line of goods, do not fear comparison, and Guarantee ALL goods to be as represented. Correspondence promptly attended to. RUDESILL & DAYKIN. A  LONG  LOST  SWORD  FOUND.    | Given to * CmirteniiK Nontherner and Recovered After Yfitr.i, Fretlert.-k Mathrr, suiu'rlntoiiilont of the New Yu:U State Fishrry cnmmiKsion lit Colrt Spring Juirlwr, has had a peculiar and interesting experience. In the winter of 1864 he l-nliHted hi the One Hundred and Thirteenth New York regiment, which was shortly afterward converted into twelve batteries of heavy or garrison artillery. Thene batteries were inwtructed in gun drill at Washington, but when It became certain that there was little danger of the Confederates attacking the capital, the regiment wan ordered lulo the field ua Infantry. They, however, clung to their title of the Seventh New Yurk heavy artillery, n designation they had received on being tninsforuiwi into gun tiers. On June 10, 1W>,, Lieut. Mather was in command of L company, which was the color company of the regiment, ami belonged to the First division of the Second corps, commanded by Gen. Hancock. The-1 command was moving on the enemy'a works ut Petersburg, V.v On the right! was the Irish Legion, und the two bodies diverged. The Confederate forces rushed through the gap, and the right of the Que Hundred and Thirteenth or Seventh New York heavy artillery were tukt'u prisoners. To save tho colors Lieut. Mather determined to bury them. This he did, ami he was in the act of burying his sword, a presentation from llnttery I, on which his namo was engraved, when a southerner stepped up and said: "Jjook iiere, Yankee, just drop that," and ordered him toiuovo inaidu theeiiL-rny's trenches. MI obeyed the order," said Capt, Mather, "and wils carrying my sword in its sent) bard, and belt in my hand, when n man in plain clothes demanded it of me. J saw he was a civilian, who hud only com*: out to have a shot at us, and 1 resisted. During, our struggle, and just us the man was about to strike me with hit* tlst, an oOiccr came up and indignantly asked ii he was about to strike a prisoner. Tho man fell back unit 1 handed jny sword to the nllicer, who, thinking I was wounded, offered me hospitality, and I wrote, his name and ad-dross on a New York Tribune that I had in my pocket Nothing could have Ik'cu kinder than the behavior of my captor. 1 was subsequently .unfilled in prisons at Macon, Oa.,'Charleston and Columbia, S. C, and lost the memoranda with t he name of the man who had my sword. I had some Idea that lie was a Georgia man, and in my travels in connection with tish culture in the southern states have always been trying to find some trace of him. "A few years ago Capt. L. Hrewster, who liad served in A company, Tenth Alabama regiment, during the war, died. A .south crn paix;r published that among his property was a sword belonging to Liciit. Mather. The item was copied into The N:i tioual Tribune, and 1 saw it. I communicated with Capt. Urewster's representative's and the old sword, scabbard and belt once more came iniw my possesion. The scabbard lint* an imlcntat ion where a ball (struck it in tho battle. They are relics*if n bygone feud, but i prize them very dear- I ly.''-New York Tribune. | 'I'll** Area of Colombia. The superliciai area of thi.i big republic, , viltichv.vtvfcd* ftlong the Atlantic seaboard from the 1st Imnisof 3Mn.ir,iK-.L�.Venezuela, Kouthwurd itlotig the Pacilie tn~I?yjiiau>r and in the iuterior to tho ujipcr waters or the Orinoco tin its western frontier and to northern tributaries of thu Amazon on the outskirts of Brazil, is about 504,773 square, miles. Its Mouthern boundary is one of tho moat definite landmarks on eartJi, being nothing less than the equator, jts total population is estimated at 2,&w,&55, [nclud-uignioi\j than 900,000 aboriginal Indians, wBo dwell in tho forests of the interior and of whose characteristic* even the Colombians know little beyond the fact that they are peaeeubly disposed toward the civilized communities if they are not interfered with. To show how little is known of some parts of the country, it may bo mentioned that the Colombian government has recently offered a reward of �300 to any one who may succeed in making his way to the coast from tho rivor Magdalena, over the Sierra de Santa Hosa.- Philadelphia Record. facturers are very careful to maktftue supply keep pace with the demand. They have learned that if they overstock the market the price falls at once, and dairymen must realize that fact, must face that fact, that the market demands fresh butter, and that you most keep the supply nnd demand more nearly in harmony.-Professor Cooke's Report. A Peanut Kxchatige. In one industry Norfolk has a monopoly. It is the mart of the peanut. This humbl and oft derided tuber cuts a considerable figure in the sum of Norfolk's commerce. There is a peanut exchange doiugabusi ness of alHiut $2*50,000 per annum, and the business of sorting, cleaning and shipping Is in the hands of three leading firms. The peanut, sometimes called by tho native the "goober/' is grown in five near by conn ties. The process of winnowing and sorting Into grades employs a great many negroes, mostly girls, who sing with great gusto as they work.--Boston Transcript. IIml lleunl of Him. An English paper alleges that "on a recent trip to Europe the chief justice of the supreme court of Texas was introduced to an English member of parliament. The introduction was mode, not by name, but by the judicial title of tho American visitor. 'Oh, yes,1 said tho Englishman, 'I hav heard of you. Your name la Judge Lynch.' -San Francisco Argonaut. The Mouthpiece of I run. In Central America travel is generally undertaken at night to avoid the heat and glare of the day, and twelve hours at a stretch In the saddle are not thought excessive. The traveler, therefore, who would see very much ot thelnterior must expect to encounter many petty inconveniences, annoyances and hardships. Though peril is not always added to privation, yet it will be well to wear conspicuously a revolver. This little mouthpiece of iron will secure its possessor proj>er attention and freedom from insult. Ha may not need to use it, but its known presence i� a potent farcy. Your p*.x;lu't will bo safer when jr�ardou by this silent watchdog. The pistol is a Cerberus that, accepts no sop*-Chicago Herald. Georgia proud of It* Orators. Has it occurred to you, gentle reader, that Gourgia brain is at a premium in this country? No orators in this country have so charmed the intellectual setise or stirred the souls of northern audiences us the lamented Grady and our little Cherokee giant Graves. No man in liio present congress is tho equal in parliamentary management and resources of our Georgia Crisp, aud now Georgians hear with pride that at the recent gathering of the Natinnnl Bar association no such attention wns paid to any s|wuki*r as to tho Hon. Walter H. Hill, of Macon.-Athens (Ga.) Ledger. A Long Pull. A remarkable fall of a miner down 100 meters of shaft (say 9113 feet) without being killed is recorded by M. lteutneaux in The Bulletin de I'lndustrie Minurale. Working with bis brother in a gallery which issued on the shaft, he forgot the direction in which he was pushing a truck; so it went over, and he after it, falling into some mud with about three inches of water. lie seems neither to have struck any of the wood debris nor the sides of the shaft, and he showed no contusions when he was helped out by his brother after about ten minutes. He could not, however, recall any of his impressions during the fall. The velocity on reaching the bottom would be about 140 feet, and time of fall 4. ID seconds; but it is thought he must have taken longer. It appears strange that, he should have escaped simple suffocation aud loss of oonaciousnustt during a time sufficient for the water to have drowned him. Fresh llnttor Wanted. \|Pc have to consider the condition of tfce xogoaot ut the present time, that consuls Bpl not take butter that hat* been kept. The time has gone by when you con pat butter an the market that bus been held over and get a good price, and we might just as well face the question first as lust. People eat butter 805 day* In the year, and they eat very nearly the some quantity. In o^her im
                            

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