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Hutchinson News Newspaper Archive: May 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - May 8, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                2 HUTCHINSON DAILY NEWS: THURSDAY MOBNINQ. MAY 8,1890. Don't Fail to Visit the Opposite Hotel Midland, Where can be seen all the latest ideas in Queens �ware, China, Porcelain and White Granits, Both Plain and Decorated. Dinner Sets,  Chamber |Sets, Water Sets, Bread and Milk Sets, Ice Cream Sets Lemonade Sets. We respectfully call the attention of Confectioners Grocers, etc., to our line of Candy Jars.^Trays, etc. We can famish anything pertaining to our line of goods, do not fear comparison, arid Guarantee ALL goods to be as represented. Correspondence promptly attended to. RUDESILL & DAYKIN. OKKJ9it.AL PAliALYSIS. THE D,SEA* : THAT NEVER SPARES A   VICTIM. TmdM OMru?Ip*hii( ch under the imnn-of pimv *K It is even doubtful If (lien* might to be any exception made It is n di�-ii�t* -.vliich In intanatinj^ and appalling n I must l>cyoiid uwiisuTft. It w ft decay of mind ami Vuly which i*. cucoodiiigly slow und gntduul, but absolutely oar tain and infinitely lunriblo. No man w womun whom ir ever attacked vcr m.-ovored. lis victims urn always in iniddlo lifft,iit uppurcnliy (he full lhlsb of health aiirt vj�nv. Erronoonx popnlar hiipre*->iun-= rmrvnihi-: n forraof #nB)Uiifcy whieliiH w> frequent untl m much tadknd tk are, it swims, very miiiiei-' our. Thohhin. that the discuvo is due principally Unaa'HS n one. Aeuiu, the disease \a not to bo confused with "softmiiiig ui the brain." Iftv&rtyifty u hardeiiing of tho brain, mid the-maun ,*pitri*.is" is really a mi*m nppurtTit bnHueinatioiis. Finally IiIk Irietidb notice thufc he is nut just the same. He rum plains erf betuiaehes, perhajK The phVMemn is oallod to, aod iterh/ip-i the disease hah not progriiKsed eofur lmt that tho phys.ieian gives the saiiKi udiftoe, ltut finally all ihe^u symp-Vjiiis boKMno more murked, with the single yieeptioB Uuitall the hendnches disap[K'ar, jujd the man tfrduren that he feel� "wnnder-fully wcfll.** or Unit he 'never felt belter in his life." He nrt* "iieeultarly," and yet hut: (iti'fingo ifkw tWienies fer making large &awa of nwney in life busiue.-s or in niiNide Hpeeu-1 at ion. Ttw doctor is n^niii callitl in, and tbi.s tiuM U*i& at, the man with sharper eye. Ho uolim* that the man, with ins ui:e. ofutitrhut i" weit;lit. Tht> nm-:cles round bin li|*� art*i eyes t.wiU'h, and the pupil of one eye n little larger than the otte-r. Jlit tongue ttv'it ot when lu* runs iL out. Uis- stin in tHi^hlly moist and hot ami hi* pulse is fulJ. All lib. sensations ace slightly dulled. He of ten cuunoc di.^tin^uisli lietween coIoth, ennnot bear distinctly, Ktmetiiuc-s eau-notnrpnmiieJl pepiwr,  en to he hallucinations. He makes purr lima* am] contract*) fur iu advauce of bin meatus. He makes u&touuding Rtfta to UJaugciu lie bragH continually of his grand health and hiu glowing prospect*. If he In a man at all liceuiiUmie.d to the use of munoy, hegoesubout making overtures for the pur-cbuue, at unurmoUB rtitm, ot hotels, horbea, railroadn, buildhiK�, stock companies*-everything. lUx lx)u^tfuiuess turns into evident delusions. Ho Is the best rider, or jumper, or walkor, or aord iihiyer, or fencer, or fighter in tho world. He otrers to make mdtches iu all tboso and every kind of sport between blouolf und any one for fabulous sums ol moaej. lie becomes more like u maniac atlilj. Ho raslies around, talking excitedly, fajit&ouhUiug wildly, exposing hUntiotf to oil Aorta of (iUyHical perils. Uo is dangeiouii *1 (hi* tlwau, not because be is ugiy or vicious, hut because bo. U bold In the e-xtreuio, aua ba>s absolutely uo foar of con&equencea, lie Aafdly Uaa to bo ylacod in restraint, Thha t� tS� (Iriitflt^ige of the dreaded "paresis.*' JUi tbe BoconU btflge the man's eiaJt-a-tiau and excittmient wears ofT. He bacouiM fatandutwpld. The oxpre^ion of his face i� utterly vacant. He otfroes witb all that It mft^ tn biia aud In ca�Us mautuscKL kla iiJUtf fo Tali dow"i7"Tn TvnTitVngt lie 'jHe�s*up"a7in Ktufrs into his pockets all the stult he can lay his hands upon. There is no vigor iu anything he does. Ho talks to himself in bed at riMit in on automatic way. He has his delu mens, but he only speaks about them In a silly way when bo is asked. He sometimes l�irks and growls when ho is alone. The first two stagf-s last from two to four years, and then come* the third and last. Tho stages shade into each other with iu Quite gradation. In the last stage tho man's whole being has t>een described as thntof a "happy lethargy." Uo is m> paralyzed that he cannot walk or htand steadily, und finally lies like wood upon his bed. He cannot feed himself, and he cannot tint anything but liquid or minced food, for he bolts his food whole. Ho Is wonderfully greedy for his food. Ho cannot utter on intelligible sound. He will finally become ho paralyzed that voluntary motion of any kind will cease in 1dm, and ho will die of physical exhaustion.-New York Sun. A whim in the prevailing taste for odd jewelry is shown inn white and gold bracelet. The design is a linked one of squares enameled and Homon polished oblongs alternating. Another dower pattern has tiny daisies and forget-me-nots separated by small Holitaires, pie Imperial revenuo of China is believed obe about 85,000,000 taol) a rear* but it is estimated that at least twice this sura is collected, the unaccounted for portion being absorbed by the provincial official*. A  MESSAGE. She wasn't oti tho playpiounil, sh* wasn't on the lawn. The little ono was mlFuUng and bedtime coining oa We hunted In tho ffardea, wo peepi-d alxmt to see If sleeping under ros� tree or lilao she might he. But nothing enme in uumver to nil our anxious call Until at length we hastened within the darkening hull. And then ujstn the srilliiwj� there broke a hilvery tone- The darling mite was ntnmling before the telephone, Ind softly, nx we listened, caine stealing down Uie suh-s: H'lo, Central! (live me heaven.  I wont to say my prayers." -Sidney Dayre in Independent IJUtorj of Finger lLIu|;�. Nobody secruH to bo able to tell exactly when finger rings were worn first, said a dealer recently. "Tho wearingof linger rings boa been almost universal and tbo custom began at a very early period of the world's history. Some traditions say that Tubal Cain was the first one to decorate his fingers with a dainty piece of metal. The firsst authentic reference to linger rings occurs in the Old Testament, where Judah'a signet ring; in mentioned. It is also evident that they were in use among the Egyptians at that time, for Pharaoh is ;>aid to have taken the ring off his own linger and put it on Joseph's hand when be made him ruler over Egypt. The Egyptians were evidently very-fond of rings, for the hands of female mummies that have been found have been profusely decorated with rings, many of them having very costly ones on every finger. Tho poorer class seem to have worn rings, too, but of cheaper material, such as bronze, glass and pottery. The ancient Chaldeans and Persians used to wear rings. In those days rings seem to have been worn not much for ornament as for practical puriKJijes. They were used for scaling. The- Koumns used to wear signet rings of iron, and every free man bad the right to wear one. AmbassadoA in tho early days used to wear gold rings as apartof their official dress. This privilege of wearing rings was afterward extended to chief magistrates and senators, 'Die emperors used to confer this right upon those whom they wMiod tu favor. Nowadays the wearing or rings baa no particular significance except the wedding ring or tho engagement ring. Anybody who wants to and who can afford to purchase one can wear a signet ring. Tho custom of wearing rings is a very popular one, and the manufacture of them forms ouo of tho most important branches of the jewelers' industry.-New York Mail and Express. THK STRANGK FLUTIST. Last Jauuury, on the first evening that a light snow carpeted the roofs of Paris, a closed earriago rolled along tho boulevards, spinning like a zebra. It was so loaded with trunks that you would have thought an actress was setting out oa a journey. Worse. Within was a valetudinarian, large and fat, one of those whom a trifle disturbs, and who think their final day of reckoning Is near when they have a cold fn tho head. This one imagined he had weak lungs. So at the approach of cold weather he bundled himself with furs and tied to Nice. He was a bachelor. Although he could have married at any time, for ho had 100,000 francs in stocks, and therefore suited many young ladles, he had been unwilling to dispose of his right hand, Next to himself, tho one he loved best wns his cook-not for herself, but for her cookiug. No one took hotter care of No. 1, Under no circumstances would he have disturbed himself to do a favor. He would not havo lent five soui to his father in the street, for it would have been necessary to unbutton his overronc to take out his p". so. He tvns indeed tho most extravagant crank to bo met with. His most insignificant nets were on system: he slept, rose, ate, smoked and took medicine with his watch iu hand. Many curious stories were told at his expense. For instance, he was so nervous, so irritable, that he detested the songstei's in the courtyards. The porter had to drive them away with tho broom. To persons who persisted In singing in the street be quickly threw n half franc on condition that they would leave. Now, every time the porter lacked the price of a drink he put on a false beard ami a red waistcoat and went under the window, tapping on a pan as a prelude to a dance. Immediately a half franc was forthcoming. The neighbors hud to hold their sides, for there are people who cannot help laughing. At Nice he always put up at the great United Stated hotel, where for fifteen years the same magnificent room, well exposed to the sun, had been reserved for his use. It was the only one he fancied, and he occupied it until April 2 ut noon precisely, the hour at which he set out for Paris. His name excited mirth. I will not attempt an explanation, but everybody smiled whenever he was introduced. Ho was known as M. Jnuue. Now M. Jaime arrived at Nice the day after leaving Paris at ft o'clock in tho evening. He partook of an excellent dinner-a bouillabaisse' aux Jaugoustes, a fillet mariue, a quail, asparagus, uud a bottle of Chateau la Rose, With this he hoped not to die with hunger. Then, after having smoked a good cigar to settle his cof!|ee and champagne, ho retired to rest. It was 0 o'clock %vhen he ensconced himself la bed. He extinguished the light, and, stretching himself out, anticipated sleep like a dormouse. But scarcely had he dropped into u. doze when a fiuto was beard in the next apartment playing the air from Faust: 'I^et, oh. Vet me gaze upon Ihy facer* The tone was sweet and silvery, so the first impression was charming; but the flutfc<". cut short the melody at the fourth measure and repeated it several times, then rested for five minutes and resumed in like maimer, stopping at tho same point. "What is the matter with himT' said M. Jaune to himself. The other continued without a sign of trouble. At the fitfh rehearsal, as there is nothing so agreeable as not to weary iu the end, M. Jaune tapped on the partition wolL The flute wns f-ilent. Satisfied, he took a potation from his night table and closed his eyes. It was 10 o'clock. The hotel was almost empty, tho greater part of the guests not having yot come in. Suddenly the peaceful silence was broken hv the flute. Physical Culture In Baltimore, llaltimoro girls are always beautiful, but they havo lately taken up the physical culture tad, which will make them more "fetching" than ever. Mr, B. F. Hounett has presented to the Woman's college, of Baltimore, a magnificent gymnasium, to ho called Bennett hall, Tho Swedish system of physical culture U used in the girle' gymnasium. They wear jaunty costumes and oomu out rosy, merry and strong. Tints the physical culture- fad is gradually working its way south.-E. ^V. C A Shifting Telephone. There are Bomo people who make queer disposals of their telephones, A well known undertaker of this city has his telephone on a dumb waiter. Ho runs It up to hiA room at night and can answer it without getting up. In tho daytime ho runs it out of sight after he hus used it, and when the people who are always waiting to "use hia telephone for a moment" drop in for thnt purpose lie tells them that they can use it if they can find ll.~~i)etroit Preo Press. <�uu�t� AUvtvjM Weighed. The Prince of Wales has long Instituted a pleasing custom of weighing Iwth the coming and the parting guests. At the first convenient opportunity, after being shown to hi* bedroom, tho guest Is weighed, the entry mudu in a book, uud he U 'icigbed ugam on the moruiiiK oI V*h* departure, The book In which this record hi kept is a bulky volume* perhaps one of the must interesting collections of autographs in tho world. Among other signatures is that of "ftalisbury," witb the per teutons uunounoouiont following that on hht lust vu.it to Saudrlugham tLt premier weighed Just over eigUtoeu stono, a record not to be regarded without uneasiness even by a person of I^ord Salisbury's laches.--Northern Echo. "Let, oh, let me gaze upon thy face!" M. Jaune grew excited. "Whew!  He is getting to be a nuisance. If this is for an extra attraction I will dispense with it." He tapped loudly and cried out: "Will ynit stop?  If you don't I'll  gaze upon your face pretty soonl" When M. Jaime got angry he forgot the dictates of politeness.    There was silence again, and ho btjgun to get drowsy. Suddenly: "ly.-t, oil, let me gaze upon ihy facel" "Fie:  The mean scamp!;| He rang for tho chambermaid. "Who is this idiot of a flutist whom I have for a neighborP' he asked. \ flutistl" she exclaimed, with a vacant air. "Why, iL Jaune, you arc dreaming. The chamber is empty." M. Jaune dared not reply. The surmise obtruded itself that perhaps be was beginning to have delusious. Besides, so long as the chambermaid was at hand the flutist could not be heard. But scarcely was she gone, crack: "Let, oh, let mo gass upon thy facer" And so on about once a minute.  M. Jaune floundered about and sank under the bed coverings exhausted. At 11 o'clock he heard some one enter. Under the partition door he saw a gleam of light. He heard the rustling of garments and preparations for bed. Afterward quiet reigned, ana he Blept, as usual, until the next noon. On this second day, after having taken a walk on the Promenade Des Anglais for a sun bath, passed a little time at tho club and dined composedly, he wont up to retire at 10 o'clock. He commenced undressing. Suddenly-just so-you havo it: "Let, oh, let mo gaze upon thy facel" Forgetting his grotesque appearance m his nightcap, half undressed, he rushed down to complain to the master of the house. "M. Favloli, why do you furnish lodgings to musical artists in a house which I thought so commeuduble'f" "Truly, IL Jauue, I do not know what you mean. I beg you to believe that I have regard enough for my interests to refuse those people." "Then you have ouo without knowing it- a flutist-at No. 10, next me. "I beg youi pardon, M. Jaune, at No, 10 is a most sedate lady, Mme, Kis^tuicouiuk, of the United States, and at No. Ois Miss White-rose, of London." *'I repeul that there ih a flutist at No. 10. Perhaps the lady thrusts htm iuto the wardrobe when auy one got* la." "I bog your pardrarngaiti, M. Jaune. Mm* Khumicouick eujyys an Irreproachable reputation. No landlord iu Nice would be willing to receive a doibtf ul character. Mme. Kiss-mfooulck tsainature widow. If she flirted It would be ueriously, and as she weighs some 301) pounds w tvpuld not be with a flute- $ha would tak/at least a clarionet. This lady goes over}f ovening into the best society, and returns ail 11 o*olook.ta JUL- Jauko, dhjconcertexi, weut back to his room, flowever, bis bead was scarcely on the pillow-crack! you have it: "Let, oh, let me gue upon thy face I" "Fhit^ JBBftinTl ewlsijcned M. Jauns.   lis �ivng Tor the eiiiniilH-rni'iin. , "Ask your umstw to  ��iiinm Mine. Kisstni-coulck's dour with Ins |n�*s key, he jioiuted to a cage on tlw tabh*, in which a bird similar to �>ur blackbirds was moving ItU head nU>nt and singing without a semblance of fear. That. i* Mme. Kissmicouick's flnie, M. Jnuue-an Australian nightingale. These birds k*urn an air perfectly nnd in the night harm the ifelghbovs." Homewhat eahm-r, for it was folly to get angry with a bird. M. Jaune wild: 'Propose, to the lady to v*dl it to nw>. Coos high as 000 francs, that 1 may have the satisfaction of wringing it" neck." "Welt, M. Ja-ui'-. I will speak to her this evening." M. Favioli complied with his promise, but Mine. Kissmiuouick sent him walking. "Five hundred f nines I'1 she cried. "I think us much of if, as a Chinaman of his pigtail. Say to that fellow that I will not sell my bird for $.">00, for it is a souvenir of my husband." The word "fellow" touched M. Jaime's seu-ibility; he grew red in the face and threatened retaliation. As Mine. Klssmi'-ouick was accustomed to >l*vp from U to 5 oVlock in tho afternoon ho *- rror of person-or rather for error ot bird. --Translated from the French for the San Kraucisco Call. PROFESSIONAL CARDS. DaifTISTB. L. �WISSMJ'Sr,   Law, Offloa, Rooms 10 and 11 Maaonlc Templa, cot ver Main and Sherman. gjU^S BHOiDJJS, iAtryer. Offloa otvx PlratNatlonaUcank. w. h. mil. h. rano! J^KWI84FIBKCB, 'Attorney, at Law. Hntchlnsoa, Kanaaa. i Booma 11 and II Ho South Main ntreat. JpAVIDSOI) A WILLIAMS, iavyan, Booma 1 and fl over Kanaga'a atora. rj-lATLOB, JOHJS8 * TATLOB, Attornaya at Law, Office, np-flUir*, Hasonlc tempi.. Journals^ Ledgers, Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinks, Land Examiner's Books oan Registers, County Records, Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, "White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Real Efitate Contract Books, Attorney's Collection RegisMrs. QAK3Y * KXHKI-INO, Attorney* at tmw, (p. glrUinRi County Attoraai. Booma I and 4, Sldllnser block. J. V. OLYMJBB. Attorney *t Offloa, aonth Main atnet, neat court honaa. pHOF. C. II. OAKE8, Teacher of Piano, Organ, Violin, Onl ar Music StudioKo. 8m Ncrlh Main, Santa Keblock, over KlnE'e Furniture Sto e. D, Room 8 First National .Bank bcilding, Botch tnson, Kansas. �r JUedoo'e Periodical Pills, the great French xemtdy. act directly on the,menstroal aye-tern and positively care suppression of the menses, warranted to promote menstruation, These pills should not be taken daringpregnancT Am. Pill Co., RoyaHv props.. Spencer, la. Genuine supplied by the A. & A. drag-store. Batcbin eon, Eon.; riwltt A Holiday, Topeka, Kan. lmyr Nn Flower 1-angunce Now. Tim fact that fashion has found its way into tliu thvwer garden and decrees what flowers shall bo ittvo'>d und what, flowers -hull be i'tit, or rather rcmnin uncut, has of uur-e wiped out what wilh known as the hm-uage of llowcrs. And that language is now iruich tijore of a dead kin^ua^e than either ek or Sanscrit, I'- is ene of tlio very few silly things that fashion ha* ever blotted out. Tin? n.-ind proce&s is for futJiioo to build silly thiugti up. it may u;iv4 been all right a number of years ugu,i"or the fond lover to proclaim his devotion by moana of a bunch of heliotrope, and for the maiden to respond encouragement with a few sprays of golden rod. Hut as heliotrope and golden rod ore very cheap and inexpensive flowers, and as fashion is absolutely ignorant of their existence, it is now considered to be in much better form for a young man bubbling over with devotion and a yearning for matrimony to use pen and ink and heavy white paper if ho is afraid to use tha English language personally, and for the young girl to rewpond after the game fashion.--New York World. Chldico 1'recoelty. The average Chicago youngster is uever at ales* for n word or a loophole. One little* one, who has been cro^.-s and fretful lately, was corrected by .�n elder sister several times without avail. Finally the elder eUtor eald "You have been very naughty lately, Eliza nnd 1 think you should pray to ho made bet-iif, 1 wish you would." Always ready and �illiug to oblige, the younghtcv knelt ii prnyer that .same night, and, addressing tho heavenly throne, said wlemnly: "Ipray tha tii" Lord will make uie better, and-'If n iir.it you cou't succeed, try, try again.Gnt-c r- m\it* lire already apparent.-Chicago Her Onieim ot Stormy Wtuther. A very rcliublo elgn of etormy weather in when the sun risco clear and shortly ncs into ;t cloud.   Thia itidtcates tho ABOH1TKOTB. T.LDHPBY. Passenger Rates REDUCED'BY THE Through Chair"; Cars Free Charge! Hutchinson to'^t,Louis Wlicro lliv Fuiilt I^le#. Tin; g,vi>r:tgc young mun cannot keop U]) with ihtj iivtit-agu young woman, or tit Wiml ImducB not. Wlieretlio fault lie, mil) fur what reason, will all come outi>y untl by, us tlx;oilierqueBtions ns "-Remember the Missouri Pacific ^T:Z7^JZe?Ah�      started m* Rednction 01 In ivliyon a failure?" would resolve it- Rates, and will sell you Tickets to Mill iuiu the question of more point, "Is all .Points East or West ot the manliness a failure'!'" tliu whole subject would ho disposed of in the same on-1 Bwer.-Uetroit Newa. | LoWCSt   Rates! One Change of Cars to New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, pivsciiei* �f rapidly comlenBins moisture Pittsburg,' Columbus, Cincinnati! In the nitnosphere. which i8 likely to fall Cleveland. Indianapolis and CW soon as nun.   A luntl color of tho sky at |____ i��j,�.v4 n .< Himriijo, liuloa around the buu and ujoon, "a rainbow in tho ruorning," and the "sun drawing water" are duo to the aaino i:utiKe, nnd uie all omens of storm/ weather.-Exeliousro.    < 19 and 21 East Sherman Street J DOES A GENERAL 0B PRINTIN Book Making -AND- SPECIALTIES IN THE BOOK DEPARTMENT. . : .vr�aK � 53o /. 1 SPECIALTIES III THE JOB OEPARMTENT. Letter Heads, Packet Note Heads, ^ Letter Note Heads, Commercial Note Heads, Small Poster?, Large Postersand Bidle, ony Btatements, Bill Heads, all sizes, Statements, ah sizes, Abstract Books, all Bizes, Deeds, Mortgages, Leases, Etc Drafts, Bank Checks, Filing Cases, Deposit Checks, Counter Checks, Notary's Seals, Banker's Cases, Crushed Envelopes, Document Envelopes, County and City Warrant Books The above is only a partial list of the goods we carry and the -work we aie prepared to execute promptly. We are making a specialty of Magazine Book Binding! and we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles and at lowest prices. We wish the public to understand that we are ready and prepared to exeiute any kind of Printing or Book Workl Have stock forms, but can make special forms to order. � j| We guarantee all work and solicit patronage. Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.   Address, NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO., Hutchinson, Kas. GEO. L. M0BBI8, President. FRAUK VINCENT, Treasurer. JOHN f. VINCENT, Becrtrtary THE HUTCHINSON cago. For Reduced Rates, call at Missouri Pacific Ticket Office. H, C. Townsend. Capita) M $100,000.  Capacity 1000 Bamit Per Day OSoe fci HntoMason National Beak building, � HuteaiMMU Kama ?400   

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