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Hutchinson News: Saturday, April 26, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 26, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                HUTCHINSON DAILY NEWS: SATURDAY MOBNING, APRIL 26,1890. Opposite Hotel Midland, Is your place to buy your French [China, Adamantine China, Semi-Porcelain and Ivory Body Dinner Wear, Both in Sets and open stock of the nios&umque ^decora-tions Six. Ten and Twelve Pieces Chamber Setsjin Printed and Hand Painted Decorations. Water Sals, Berry Beta Bread anil Milk Sets, Ice Cream;! Set*, Hanging, BUnd and Hand Lamps, Glassware.  Please call and Bee our goods. RUDESILL & DAYKIN. LOSS. Bomrthtnfl la gone; 1 know It by this pain. But yesterday I hod It; To-morrow, though I bade It, It would nut come again. Boitvethlng Is gone; What Bhatl we that thing caflf A touch, a tone that thrfled me, A hidden joy that fllied met Bny, that H all. And now 'tis gone, Lightly as Drnt it cams; Tlie sky a little coIJor, The heart a llttlfl older. All eltto tho sama AM clue the sainef O death, all covoring soal Oome with thy floods and drown me; That thing I sought to crown me Wok all tho world to mo. --London Spectator. The Policeman nnd the ftaby. "Boron people have peculiar ideas us to tho dnbtos af a policeman,11 said Surmount Burko. 'Atow minutes since, 1 was coming down Broadway nnd I saw a nicely dressed lady, carrying a child of nltout 3 mouths old, I should think, stop tho patrolman in front of me. I was near enough by this ttmo to hoax her first qat'Mtlou, which warn " 'How often do tin* horse cars pans heref '"About every ton minutes, ma'am,' was tbo officer's reply. " *Doar tnol I have been waiting bore longer than that now,' she continued. Then, looking up at tho uflieer, sIki ask'-d, with a Wort innocent and appealing expression, 'WwW you mind staying here and holding baby until tho next cur comes? I am so tired.' "When I toll you that tho oltin.u- in questiou was tho old rot bachelor on tho f ww, and hod nfivtir in tlu> luuuiory ft itinn lmd a baby in Ids arms, put-Imp* you can imagine tho look on hi* toco a-* ho turned and stalked away." -Kansas City Times. >f.*ij�iiiutitio tiioni, �y miming arrnng%-111011 ts which nttrnct tho flies and facilitate tli'! disposition and safety of thoir eggs.- Earnest Jngfrsoil. Fortune* In Church Lacea. There are also fortune^ invested iu ecclesiastical laces. Those In-longing to tho Fifth Avenue cathedral aro said to be valued at $100,000. Tho lato Rev. Dr. Ewer, formerly of St, Ann's BpUoopal Church for Deaf Mutes, owned lace vestments and sacra-mental lace* probably worth $50,000. Many churches own $5,000 worth of laces,-Interview in New York, Star. St. Petersburg tailors got up a scheme for publishing in the newspapers tbo names of all their customers who refused to pay thoir billH, but the government forbade it. Now tho tailors accomplish the same object by putting up a large blackboard in the reception rooms of tbt ir shops, upon whioh they chalk the names of the chief delinquents and tho amounts of thoir bills. They say it has reduced by 00 per cent, their losses. At a banquet at San PVancl.^eo of the XJn dortakers' association of California the menus wero printed on cardboard cut in the shape of a coffin, and among tho dishes wore crab salad a la flot&lre, chicken dressed a la sbroude, smelt* sorved on stretcher and stowed tomatoes a la grippe. THINGS SOME WOMEN DO. GIRLS   WHO    AMUSE    OTHERS AMUSING  THEMSELVES. IN Fresh I'lowers in Ournmny. It appears that from tho beginning of No* vomln-r, 18SS, to the uwlof May, liHKI. cut, dowel's to tlie value of over 11142,773 wero sent, abroad from Camius, of which the majority went to Horlin atui other largo towns in Oermany. The art of arranging fre^h flowers artistically is said to bo mast successfully prncticiid by German Judy florists, a larfco number of wiiom inuk� n cuinfortahiu living by this employment. Tho trade has during tho hwt few years been particularly flourishing, gifts of fresh tlnwcrs being very populai- with all cltuistts in liermany. Not only is every futility festivity made tho occasion of gifts of flowers, but tho custom of bo-stowing bouquets or posies on the parting guest or friend is greatly increasing. Tho rich lady takea her magnificent baskets and fanciful bouimcU into liyr carriage as she takif* Ii*iivo of her friends at tho station, and tho j>oor woman carries mvay her pot of fuchsia or uiignonotte, wrapped in a pU-ce of pin); tissue pajHTuiid ornuineiiUHi with n bit xsf rihlwiL-PiUl Wall trazutte. AftbttstoM 31 Inh>K> Mining ix curried on by cut ling down tit" bills of usbisuis bearing b.'ijit-iit inc. much a.-, a fiii'm'T cut.'j liow i) a :-iac!i "I liny or raw, ci* by open (piarryififi on th�' lcvv\. Th^ rod. LS blasted out and tluj ;t-i".'-t-is, suparaU'd from tho containing rod;, i* "rr-bhi'd,1' th:it is, M'iMinitot Tli�in Wi It*: f�>r Tf^wftpiiiKtr* and , Arte Not   Rn�*�T*riiE that It will     printed and a comforlnbh* lit-tie chock be returned in acknowledgment. The eutertdining fcAturo of this freshest feminine excitement is Umt every girl who indulges in (t is utterly sanguine that each j word site writes will bo eagerly accepted by i the spellbound editoiv-, and that fame is rushing toward her with the speed of a well equipped locomotive.   Unlike men, these as-pirauts for journalistic laurels regard tho ta^k of composing available newppojier reading about n-i (fi-riousJy as they would that ci' sowing on their buttons,   hi truth, I beliovo they go about the literary exercise ovon more lightly tbim tho domestic oho.   Journalism with them is not ft profession, but n pastime. They nre suro that they camo into tho world fully cquip[>cd for it, and that it can be taken up and enjoyed like a new novel. "DEOUKKD WITH THANKS." I met a girl the other day who has recently been reduced to a rather impecunious position in the world. "Oil, I'm all right," she Raid, *'I shall make pleuty of money." H'hcn she was asked what her plan was for enriching herself, she replied: ''I ain going to begin writing for the newspapers noxt week," With a truly sublime faith, this girl Is now seuding in manuscripts to all the newspaper oflVes iu New York. Ten davB of toll have brought iu nothing. Bue her example, if it could be held up lieforo the hundreds of other amateurs who are smothering tho editors in tlie unavailable pearls of their young fancies, would not deter a single straggler from her endeavor to roach tho pinnacle of fortunoand fame. It was at a reception in the rooms of a well known litterateur the other night that a rosy bud of temptbig sweetness, iu a snowy gown, dashed up to the editor of a morning paper, who was present, and exclaimed: "Ob, I'm so glad you aro going to print my article tomorrow," "Ilavo we soinothing of yours?" asked the editor, 'Yes, indeed," replied the girl. "I mailed it yesterday." Tho editor smiled and changed tho subject; but for soino uuoxplainod cause tho beauty's effusion did not se*> tho light of tho noxt day. At her breakfast t.iblo she found an ominous looking euvolope, for which the servants told her there way six cents extra poslagu to be paid. Tearing open the massive thing, that most li'pressing of all inanimate objects, a rejected manuscript, was laid stark and awful before her. On a little detached slip that fluttered into her lap tho most horrible of all words the young nowspapor worker burned into her eyes: "Declined with thanks." Still our girls persist in making their fortunes as uewKpnper writers. Equestriennes afoot have become- a common sight in New York city, anil they are to be seen, in their variations of tho conventional hors-iback costume, walking to and from the stables around Central park. They look like thoie heroines which old fashioned novelists and dramatists used to put in their romances, and who were ever being saved from deadly perils by the opportune heroes. But these New York maidens of the saddle aro more utilituriau. One of tbem was on a fractious horse, and the Wast pranced, billed, reared, plunged and seemed determined to throw her oJF, She kept her .seat in a most determined maimer. At length the b":ist gave unmistakable evidence that bo was going to lii down and roll over. "Help: help!" the girl cried, showing for the br>i lim-- /my fright. ltttav in' i      and pootie young man who r^j-pondi'd, itui -i 1'ijj'Jy j,�.'irk policeman, who said     1.-' --i/.ed the now squatted horse by "    '      Why don't you get I>uuc�r from Vlre. An old gentleman, a doctor, scut fur tho chief to complain that for weeks there was an odor of siuoko in ft room, ft appeared to come from under a carpet, At timos it would not l>o detected. Chief Gicquol pulled back tho carpet, cut op tho floor and found a beam, the core of which was burned Into for several feet by a firo which wns traveling to u draught from a brick duo on which tho end of tho beam Jm-piugeiL Iu building tho best houses wooden materials c.r�j ho lUacvd. t^atftomo day they will Ijc touched by flro which will eat lis way to air. If an odor or smoke that cannot be entirely explained is detected in any house, tho mifost way is lo g'� to tlw nearest flro quarters.-- How York News. A fetaluu In the Cloudi. A wonderful pheuomuuou was witnessed by tbo passougoi's ou tho 1 o'clock Jeisoy Central ferryboat one afternoon. When th� boat was near tho How Jersey shore a bright mirage was dkooverod iu tho uir right over th� Jersey Coutrul depot. Tho whole bay was retloctod on tho clouds and ships were to be scon ou plainly as if they wore ou the water. Just before tho boat reached the Blip the magnlticont Btatuo of Lil>crty was weu in the mirage, and it made a most beautiful and impress!vo spectacle. Tho statue was clearly revealed and it seemed to be about a thoiiiand toot in tho air.-Now York "World.      _ bating Flies. In Mexico a favorite dish with tbo common peojilo is a compote of the eggB and young of the common houso tly, which bt gathend in tho spring- from tha surf act* of tlie wn'ir u tho maj-sltos tumr tho city of Mexico iu veu�t quuntitiorf. Certain Indians living tbare not 9p'y i^^l". Uu->)tf a� of j>rocurlnc Uiwu. but The pathetic adventures of a carrier pigeon lately employe*! by tlie empress to bear a, letter to her daughter, the Archduchess Mario Valerie, may b^ noted by writ'-rs of ilotion in (pit r-t of new iii"ideii\i:. The bird was one of those M-hich urn i rained for t-vrviee nt the liit-t-md ut' i'ob, ;m*l uheti f he empress recently Nidt-d from i'ol-i to Corfu she tojk thb pige-Mi on board her yacht, having arranged to let i! ily with a letter tor her daughter at u certain distance from tho coast. It was supposed that the pigeoon would return to Puhi, and orders were given to forward the contents of the letter which it carried bmno-diately by telegraph to tbo young Archduchess. Unfortunately a peasant with u gun taw the bird nnd shot It. Ho did not notice tho letter, which was no doubt blown off with tho shot, and so, while ht* boro homo tho empress' winged messenger for supper, the letter remained ou tbo ground. It was accidentally found a few days afterward, and now royal newspapers aro proposing that, to to proveut a recurrenco of such mishaps, pigeons hhould no moro bo shot at all. It is a wonder that nobody has suggested that carrier pigoons on state servlci? should lx� put into a showy uniform, like those in which tho Austi'iau civil servants aro shortly going to astonish their fellow subjects.-Exchange. fcnre vea^t Ann lei^v'niTeffi'rAtfiiV iu Washington. Mhw Anthony does not look to Im oiore than sixty. Mr. Kf!!y remarks, iu his llttlo hook on proverbs: "Lf thi've be truth in pvoverlw, men have no right to reproach Women for bluiibing. A woni'm vmi "t least kc^p herown h^fei.   Try her   wild to in\ tho mo), whofo faith in her is almost fnuatr iei�Mn. - Chicago Herald. l)r.'ssmakers in New York are iu greater detitnnd titan male latx/rers. They get $:j � day wh^re a man cets only $1.50. Of course dressmnking U not common labor, but the femal sull'rugist may ibid in this comparison tome hopxj for the ultimate equaHznthm of wages I tot ween the sexes.-New York Press. There is an agitation in Paris in favor of giving to women engaged Ju bushier (he right that men similarly engaged have-to vote in tbo choice of judges before whom come for settlement matters of commercial litigation. The scheme is advocated by many of the leading French politiciani*, who refuse to be frightened by the idea that this will be only an entering wedgo for universal female riuifrago. tllKturte Houiet. Two historic mansions stand in the town of Ledyard, Conn. One is tho Allyn homestead, at Allyn's Point, on tho Thames river, and theothor the Rodman Nilos mansion, which is situated far bock from the banks of the river in tho heart of the town. Both houses figure iu the history of tho Union, and are in a good state of preservation. A correspond* out at. New I�udon writes of tho AUyn homo-nl that its exact age is not known. It is s:d'l to have been built by Robert AUyn or by one of his sons. Robert Allyn settled at Mlyn's Point near tho middle of tho Boven-Leenth century and retired a largo family, dt*-sfvinhints of whom are now influential in huMiie-s circles In New York and Chicago. Tie- Niles mansion is described as nn immense himneyed pile, stimding alouo amid huge elm trots* over n mile from any human habi tation and on tho edge of a forest. It is said to have been, erects I in 1702. It is painted it-s original color- tho bright red that was so commonly used in New England a hundred years ago-and the rived chestnut shlngl t glued," sho gasped, "only buttoned on." Anil indeed she was. Detormined not to be thrown by her spirited steed, sho bad devised a whetne of fastening herself to tho saddle. But hereafter she will use it only on a horse that cavorts without lying down. the handy handbag. On tlm aniiiversiu'y of your natal day some one gi\you a haudbftg. You u�ver have carrit d one, and you always thought that you never would. It is a Weak, feminine failing, (hi-, being slHayis li'-'l lo a b.'ig. Still, sinee  tbb. o'.e ha-, beell   givi-n   to VOU, J"uU think you will try it; U will hoei your Imnd-l:ere!ii.d'--one's p"'\.cl g(:; .hit uf the way (ioinetimes: and it i-i a good thing to have   poke anil pry and Mrng^lo and exelalm over tryiuv; t'.� get at on*-'s purse, usually stranded, like Sb.Giiay, in the bottom of the bole your dro^maker calls a pocket. Besides, ciiatigu is a bother iu a pockettjOok. His easier just to make a practice of dropping small money iooso in tho handbag, so that you will have it handy and can generally 1>� sure of finding a stray five cent piece or a penny there. Presently the advantages of the bag for holding on extra handkerchief and "another pair of gloves" occur to you. Is is bo bandy, if you make up your mind suddenly to go to a matinee, to have decent gloves ready and a nice clean bandkerchief. It will really be a great idea to make o habit of keeping an extra pair of gloves in the handbag. By and by you get in the way of dropping small bundles, iuto the bag. The few yard* of fuelling that you feel so mean about having "wmt" you can really take without inconvenience to yourself by just dropping it into tho bag; likewise the little book you would not have bought except that your bag is "so bandy for small things" and really holds so much without getting full. Dear inol You don't know what you would do without it, though you must get over the habit of putting your half pound of candy in it. It spoils one's gloves so to go fishing around a bag for a stray cent aud getting one's lingers all over candy. New York Letter in IJostou Herald. Our Olrls iu I'tibllo Life. There may lie girl-* in our stores who are impatient of homo discipline aud anxious to see the world for themselves, but the bulk of the daughters of clergymen, doctors, proles-nioual men, etc., who seel: to tlnd t-omo means of livelihood in tho world's hard highway, do it simply because, they are comj.'oJJod. They Imvo by no means turned their bock on iK'-^-ible hu^baml- ;.nd Iiojup-3 of their own ; and it i* cruel to up-..,1,; us if their "no chance uf iinppifa^s and tiii^ womanhood lay in the one direction which -^-ems closed to them. Work they must, or they will starve; and there uie scores of girls working now in all uur large cities as jounmVtsis, typc*wriU;i"B, urli.it;-, proof renders. shorUiand clerks, who keep themselves us "uusjsjlti.il from the world" as if they lived in the w-clusiou of o. country parsonage.-New York Journal. l'retty Oabrlrltc Gn*el<*y. Miss Gabrielle Greeley, daughter of Horace Greeley, who, as a girl of lh, was a famous belle, resides very quietly ou the old farm ut Chnppaqua. Sho is ainnil DiJ years of age, still very beautiful, bm ha* ulmoRt entirely given up society, devoting herself chiefly to buritablo work under ritualistic auspices. She Ixjught in the old Greeley homestead, and has since spent much money and time ou the Episcopal church near by. Perhaps no girl in America ever had a letter claim to social recognition both at home and abroad than Misi Greeley, whose beauty is of a striking ehorneter and whose acevmijAislnneiits are many, yho was the rag-' for two seusons in Ltnidon, but while enjo;� ing tiie simple pleas-tire.-j'if life cared noihmg fur its social snc-t't�..'i- Epoch. J Y. OLYKBR. Attorney Mt Uv, Office, south Main street, near court houi*. jpUOF. C. 11. OAKBS, Teacher of Piano, Orjran, Violin. Guitar Maelc SmdJoNo. Ncrih ifafa, Santa Pe block, over Kind's Furniture Sto e. 19 and 21 East Sherman Street,! DOES A GENERAL T0B PRINTING Book Making -AND- AKOHITBOT8. �iUKPHY, AdvantHC* of Havhig; Small Hundt. Do you know that woman with very uiiall bauds have the advantage In the glove market! There is always an overplus of bj^Sj and they aro sold cheap. A woman who can wear this number and can tell a good glove when she sees it-not a difficult thing to do if you have an eye for It-can always be well gloved almost for nothing. The sJaea from 0 to G%s inclusive, aro mostly sold to women.- New York Mall aud Express- Pin* mid Needle*. The most charming object of nature la an amiable and virtuous woman.-1.1. Rot&euu A man can defy public opinion; a woman must submit in resignation,-Frau von BtaeL No uue In the world behaves with less politeness to women than women themselves. Jean Paul. There was a funeral m Ports, Ky., recently, in which eight women acted as pallbearers. Sarah Jones, colored, was tlie person buried, and eight sisters of a colored lodge bore the remaius iuto the chut ch. Susan B. Anthony's attainment .^ iK-r life. Slicing."' enter any (ecuon-ti'in fho choxiKiw, work m any li.its sho lik*:K, ale. i.e eeriain, not only '.-f iht appcobutiun <<1 in'h\iduals, but of th:a o( tu  cuinuiunity in uhuh r.ite Jives. The atmosphere of Jios-t.nt within the gates, ami that, larger Boston wilie ut the gates, in all the Newtons and  e.ii-r -nburbs, is an atm-'.-phere of freedom .'� ..-e u> be.-Boston Transcript. Miv.. Gustavo Ambei'g, wife of the manager, i* to lie st'cn every night in a box ut her husband'* tlieutru, iu New York city, just us regulm-ly as tho drop curtain, and is the uion; attractive vision of the two. She is there when tho orchotia's rung in, and no matter what the performance,nor how tunny times she has :ieen it, there s-Lo siu, always ui the same position, profile toward the house, t ill tier eiirtuin falls on the last act. According to our forefathers it did not look "el! for a woman to be always sightseeing, an such was mi indication that she was not sufficiently domesticated, and was too fond of pleasure. Hcnco, it was usually said: A woman oft seen, a gown oft worn, Are distil teemed and held in scorn. nit enet in >our cunir v.-ricn r*-d:.*, JZ-as erect when writing as possiblo. if you bend duwnward you not only gorge tbo eyes with bb id, but tho brabi as well, and both juffer. Tbo same rule should apply to the usu of tins microscope. G�t one that will enable yon Ut look at things horizontally, nol ulway* vertically. iun.no tne.fHU, tUQ fTOUCh MsttT or M-Ol'Cy who has rtvelved tho Cross of the Legion ;if Honor at the hands of the governor of Toiirpiij), wa� only '2Q years of ago when she received her tlrst wouud ia the treacbos o* llalaklava. On one occasion u grenade fell Into her ambulance; sho nehced it and ran with it for 100 yards, and her patients' lives wero saved, though she herself was severely Injured by the bursting of the missile. Mrs, Asher Wortheluier rece/itly sent ou loan to an exhibition at Nottingham tho famous llouuce of old raised Venetiun point luce, formerly belonging to Marie Antoinette, and worn by her ou her marriage with l^iuis XVI of France. Tho diuieiuilouii of this flounce are 4# yards long by three quartern of a yard wide, of matchless design, and undoubtedly one of tho moat remarkable examples of hand made lace in the world. the highest bidder, tho following described per-"idhI [.roperty, to-wtt: The entire ptork of dry goods, notions, furnish Ing goodf. millinery goods, and sll the goods and merchsridiFe aud all iUturea consisting of counters, Bhplvi"c, show rapeu, snip, desks, stoves, racks, pae sad electric, light flxtiusB, chairs,atoolft, mirrors, alao carjitt**, cloakSt gloves and picture.*, etc. Given under my hand thin Ifith dav of April A. I) , 1M�      GBORGE C. UPUBUBAFF, Sin.mt Receiver i�r i.t-tl lie's P*rlcKllcal Pills, tte greht French reniedv. act dire- tlv on the menstrual system and poHMveJy ctire* enppresslon of the rnenfes WdrrHfifed to promote mflrtfltrntitton. 1 hese tdllB should not takvvidurVni'Vi^^nancT .Am. I'tll Co., Boyaltv props.. Hpencer, la. Genuine supplied by the A. &. A. drug store, Untchln eon. Ksn : eiwtrt 
                            

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