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Hutchinson News: Saturday, April 19, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 19, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                HUTCHINSON DAILY NEWS: 8ATUEDAY MORNING, APRIL 19,1890. I CHINA 1HAIL Opposite Hotel Midland, Is your place to buy your French China, Adamantine China, Semi-Porcelain and Ivory Body Dinner Wear, Both in Sets and open stock of the mostj unique decorations TZD LZZJ Six, Ten and Twelve Pieces Chamber Sets in Printed and Hand Painted Decorations. Water Hats, Berry Seti Bread and Milk Sets, Ice Cream Beta, Hanging, Stand and Hand Lamps. Glassware. Please call and see our goods. RUDESILL & DAYKIN. THE LOVE OF  LIFE. Tto sweet to hear th� hunter* horn Aid deepening cries of boundi star Kerom the hills where I waa born And all the Jc-ys of memory aro. Tia swoet to catch the first pale ray Tbea ushers m smother morn. And sweet to breathc the same old war TtM ftnasrant breath of early dawn. T1s sweet to see a floating cloud VufofcUng fancies fair on high, Bnt sad the dark celestial shroud That gloom* Its pathway far and nigh. Tie sweet |o see a rose in bloom, With all its pearly banners flying. But sad, how sad, to see Its doom When affitfce winter winds am nlghlng. Ob, life ia sweet, bow sweet to live When all it life and lovo around us; But life U sad, how sad It In When ILfo has lost the tla thai bound us. -Atlanta Constitution. COLORS  WOMEN  CAN  WEAR. Haraony fletween the Individual and the Apparni IJirn-Mimted, That devoted disciple of Dulsarte, Henrietta Russell, saye that tb� only woman who can wear black to ad van Lope Is tho one who has black oyeu, block halt* mid is tut. Mont girls of IS could wear black, but there is always a eolor that each person looks bettor in than In black, which sho thinks ibould nevor be worn in clothes, not oven in mourning by Christiana. "Why then, if black h so bad, is it so gen-rally woroP' the writer asked. 1 "Lying north of Europe on an island is a oity that pretty well ruhv; tho world; that city la under a continual fog; now choose a color t� wear on n foggy, dark day, something that won't 'show dirt,'and you have found the reason why Huuny India and sunny America wear black-Ix-causo they wish to be *so English.' Tins wearing of this dismal hue belongs to modern time*. Who ever heard of a Greek or an Oriental or an Egyptian in blackr "As to harmony' betw-acu tho individual and tho dross," continued Mrs. Russell, ,lyou can make it iu three ways; tlrst, by contrast, which in the Hay children, savages and un-oulturod people see colors. A child notice r bright light tiecaune it is diffcrcut from other things near it; tho Havage likes red because ususJij ho sues only tho low tones of woods wirt forests .about him, and rod strikes his dull observation. People use the primary colors-rod, yellow and blue-became they are childish, r barbaric and uueducabed in color tjspse,; 'Tho second way of making harmony t* by the mature of as many colore on possible. Tb* best G&io of this kind of color mixture that (can ttdnk of/is a flf teen hundred dollar Indian shawl that I saw yesterday and Millet* 'Angelus/ which I uaw a few weeks ago. The prhimaUc red, yellow or bluo are to these rich combinations as one note Btruek on the piano, in to a full orchestra. A mix Hire of color tike this brings out by correspondence tho many colon* thu- are in tht< skin. Rich colore, however, must not be worn by a too delicate t-kiu; its delicate tones would be killed by contrast with tho rich colors, and the result would be a white or gray complexion. Tho samo richuess nf color can bo found in the 'fuile' tints of some In dian or art rubrics, norm uf the color \mi\ t it jaade.", tsueumuig w nrn* latify, mie h ^-* whom they represent; then, it may bo, hhe finds she bos cast away her dearest friend; has giren the place of honor to one whom she regards with Indifference, and ro on. If she gives droll or Incongruous answers, the game Is rendered more lively and amusing.-Ladies' Home Journal. Th� Woman with the Band Irs, Across the aisle is a woman with two small children mid iimuuKirable parcels. The aggregation occupy four Mats and she pay* one fare. I like ber monjjscutal assurance. But 1 w one of these women get her just deserts the other day. .Beats were at a premium nuil she hud her little packages spread all about her. Enter a lady who was an advocate of equal suffrage, even among her own sex. "Remove your bundles, please.'* '"I cannot; you can Hud a seat further front" "It will bo no freer than this; remove your bundles, pleuso." With a scarlet face tho female monopolist gathered her pile of packages into her lap and crawled Into her shell. 1 wanted to shake hands with that little woman who had asserted herself, and in such a ladylike way, too.-Chicago Times. Pimento or "allspice1' (so called becnutie it is supposed to combine the flavors of several other spices) is the dried fruit of a West Indian tree. It Is mnoh ciitttvatod in Jamaica, and the long avenues of trees yielding the fruit are called "pimento walks.*1 Odd Superstition nf the II*d Houm, According to Grimm it is the devil's brides out of whoHu mouths the soul runs m the lhape of u red mouse. Thus we are told that In Thuringia a servant girl fell asleep while her companions wore shelling nuts, when they observed u little red mouse creep out of her parted lips and run out of the window. One of those present shook tho sleeper, but, uot succeeding in awakening her, moved her to another room. Presently the mouse returned to where the girl had been sitting, but, not finding her, vanished. The girl died iiihtaiilly. A miller cutting firewood in the Black Forofct fell asleep over his work. Ilia companion saw a mouse creep out of bhi mouth and run away. Others were called and a thorough search made for the mouse, but it could uot be found. The miller never awoke. In Bohemia it was formerly considered dangerous to sleep while thirsty, as the soul was mire to leave the body in search of water,- St. Louis Republic. DAY  DAWN. The Ant low fluttering breath of wakening day Stirs the wtuV air. Thin clouds of pearly bass Float slow ly o'er the hky to meet t lie rays Of the unviivn nun; w.kmc faint tt?nms piny Among the drooping Ki.it>, kiting away Their winning eyes to plumber. From thegaxr l,U;e mow wrestlwot approach of vernal days, The moon's pale circlet melts Into the cray; OJad ocean quivers to 1 he gentle gleams Of rosy light that touch his glorious brow And murmurs Joy with  all  hi* thousand Mrftini; And earth's fair taee Is mantling with a glow, IJke youthful beauty In iu chanfreful hue, When slumbers, rich with dreams, are bldduur her adieu. -Samuel Adams Lee in Pioneer Press. Facial P�ro�ptlon. Mr. W. R Levy, who is blind, says in bio book, "Blindness and the Blind," that ho can tall when he is opposite an object, and can parot ive whether it is tall or short, slender or. bulky. He can also determine whether It be a solitary object or a continuous fence; whether a close fence or an open one, and sojcotlmes whether a wooden fence, a stone wall *-T a hedge. None of the five senses has anything to do with this perceptive power, but the impressions are mado on the skin of tho face, and by it transmitted to the brain. Bo therefore names this unrecognized sense facial perception." The pretence of a fog Interferes with facial perception, and makes the impressions faint and uaf-t^it worthy; but darkness.is no impediment. A noite which distracts the attention interferes with the impressions. In passing along the street he can distinguish shops from private houses, and doors from windows, if the windows consist of a number of panes, and not of a single sheet of glass. Kngllah Girls Defeat Amarlean Vam. Dr. Peter McBwinny, surgeon of the In-man steamship City of Chicago, tells me that there were among the passengers of that ship, bound for New York several years ago, a large contingent of the Wilson Barrett dramatic troupe. One day, for the purpose of wearing away the time, it was suggested that a certain number of the Englishmen aboard pull a tug of war against an equal number of the Americans aboard.. The proposition met with general approval and the contest took place, the Americans making a very poor showingagainsttheirsturdiercousins. Thereupon the young women of the Barrett company-there were about a dozen of them- challenged an equal number of the American gentlemen to a tug of war, and, the challenge being accepted, the way those girls yanked those meu over that deck was outrageous to a degree.-Eugeno Field's London Letter. Kxplorinc a Cave In Tennessee. We all met ugain with lanterns and plenty of matches. We began to descend In the cave. We went about 100 yards, when the ceiling seemed W be about fifteen feet above our beads; the walls were.as smooth as a plunk. We camu to a small creek, crossed it, and about thirty yards from the creek we found a ptte of 8>\hes, two old fashioned rifles, three platch*, one ladla and some bullet molds. One of tho pistols had the letters 8. T. on the handle, and on the wall was written M. B. Thomas, June 2, 1796. In an entrance further on we found tho skeletons of five human Iwings. Oft* to ouo side lay a skeleton that whined to be that of a woman, for on her right forefinger whh u plain gold ring lettered: R, W. to M. K., 181c Dr. Bneed took thu riu� off tho finger. We ulso found one tooth plug of gold.-Letter in Nashville American. How Author* Are (Juoted. Which Kuglisb nut burs are the richest in supplying "familiar quotations?' According to ilr. Morley, Wordsworth t-tnuds third ou the list, A reference to tho latest edition of 'Bartlett,'1 which id far the hi^t collection, docs not quite bear out Mr. Morley's *trtlament. Here in a lint of the number of pagr-s flllod by some of thu chief authors severally: Shakespeare.........118 Scott.................fi Milton................ 5t Tennyson............. H Pope................. 20 Oruy.................. 7 Wordsworth......... JS Butler................ 6 Byron............... CI  Coleridge............. 0 Oowper.............. 10 Longfellow........... 6 Dryden.............. 10 Young................ t Ooldsmlth............ 0 Bums................ 6 Johnson..............   8 Chaucer.............. 4 Moore................  8 Campbell............. 4 -New York Commercial Advertiser, Telephoning In Itusala. During 1880 experiments wore carried out with a view to establishing telephonic communication between Mohcow and tit Petersburg* by means of the ordinary telegraph line, tho system of teluphouy employed being that of Mr. K, Grosdeff. Tho peculiarity of Mr. GroudeiTs system centers In the fact that the conductor employed ia of iron, whereas it has hitherto been behoved impossible to use iron wire for long dUlance telephony. The Russian officials estimate that a lino between Moscow and St, Petersburg, constructed with iron wire, would cost at least liO per cent, less than if copper wire were used.-Electrical Review. An Extraordinary Tree. One of the most extraordinary of African trees is that known as tho baobab. It la almost a forest in itself and sorvos for a complete sylvan pahuv> on the largest scale. Rarely growing more thou seventy feet high, its broncheri extend horizon tolly, supported by a truuk which has a girth greater. It Is believed, thau that of any other known tree. One of those extraordinary trees was found ci measurement to bo forty feet in diameter. The aj;e of another-counting the conoentrlo rings-was found to bo 5,000 yeara at the vary least,-New York Telegram. iiveryootiy mouths m" Japan'. Tlfo pipes hold a little wad of fine cut tobacco as big as a pea. It is fired, and the smoker takes one long whiff, blowing the smoke In a cloud from his mouth and nose. The ladles have pipes with longer stems than the men, aud if one of them wishes to tdiow a geuUetnan a special mark of fuvtu* she lights her pipe, takes half a whiff, hands It to him and let* him finish out the whin*.-Chicago Herald. Future of Mechanical Freeslns;. Mechanical refrigeration has been successfully applied in the laying of piers for bridges, where treacherous silt and quicksand make excavation by the ordinary methods difficult; the semi-fluid material at the bottom of the calreon being fro ten by the application of pure brine and removed while still solid. It seems probable that the same method may be of service in tunneling through such materials In the beds of rivers. Indeed, the fields of usefulness of processes for the production of artificial cold are being extended daily, und they doubtless are destined to take an oven more important place in the Industrial word of tho future than they have in that of the past- Profeseor Edward L. Nichols in Cbautauimnn, No Cipher Needed. A remarkable telegram broke up the entire establishment in a big Broadway store recently. The head of tbe firm received a dispatch conveying this information: "A mosquito ill today. Cant come down." Ho colled in the other partners and the chief clerks for a consultation. They had no cipher that fitted the telegram, but after awhile light dawned upon one of tbe party. A bright young man in the store rejoice* in the name of AmoK, and, being under the weather, his mother wrote this telegram: "Amos quite ill today. Can't come down." BnsineaB was suspended for Jin hour while tho establishment waa recovering its equilibrium.-New York Sun.___ llualness lo Uussla. A well known merchant of Kieff thought It merely a clever stroke of policy to bribe all the telegraph messengers to bring him every telegram addressed to the business men in whose speculations he was interested. He paid one ruble per telegram, and having read, copied and resealed them, he sent them to the consignees and used the Information thus acquired for bis own euda. He profited by this trustworthy source of information for two years, and would probably have continued to profit by it till his death bad the conspiracy not been discovered-by the merest accident. -Fortnightly Review. mnfii niv * "eq'leiii.   ;,-tenor"*,?7rop'^inR nre characterised by a filing of general wenk-dcprrsNtun of spirits, nnd aversion for labor even in imlustrWu-* mibjecbt, with uend-ftchr and iuKomnli). A str-.ms dose nf eoll'ce cause*! the teni]H>- * niry diHuppearaiico oi all these symptoms. Tho muscular symptoms consist of iliutinct musculnr \venl;uesH and trembling of the hnnds even during rest. Tho circulatory symptoms ore marked by a snail, rapid, irregular pui&o tuid feeble impulse of tho apex of the heart. Palpitations and heaviness in the precordial region are frequent. The hands and feet feel very cold, and the complexion bocomos sallow. Dyspeptic symptoms, chiofly of the norvous type, are very common. These coffee drinkers cannot be cured by simple abstention from their favorite drink, with substitution of milk as a beverage. They require rest from work, open air exercise, cold ablutions followed by friction, and small doses of brandy.--British Medical Journal. A Natural Curiosity. Devil's lake, in Calhoun county, Ala., Is one of the most remarkable curiosities to be found in. America. The lake Is oval in shape aud covers about four acres of ground. No vegetation of any kind grows on ite banks, and nothing lives in its waters. Even snakes and terrapins shun the waters of Devil's lake, and fish placed in it die in a few hours. The water is clear limestone, with a peculiar taste, which makes it unpalatable to man or beast. Horses and cows will not drink it, no matter how thirsty they may be. Deep down below the surface of the lake may bq seen what appear to bo the charred and blackened trunks of large trees. They stand upright In the water, bnt have neither root nor branch and never rise to the surface or sink to the bottom. The lake has no outlet, and the volume of water in it is the same all the time, A. strange fatality attaches to this lake. Once it was the favorite resort of the boys of the neighborhood for bathing and swimming, but now they never go near it. Fifteen boys have been drowned in itfl waters in twice as many years. A forr of the bodies were recovered, but those who were drowned any distance from tho banks sank to the bottom and were never brought to the surface. The depth of the lake has never been ascertained. Soundings to a depth of 700 feet found no bottom, and the people in the vicinity pay the lake haB none.-Philadelphia North American, A Kind Hearted Miller. In Bllas Wlckham's sawmill, on Bowman's Creek, a robin built her nest in a queer spot one summer. The mill had been idle for some time, and lata in May, while Mr. Wickham was getting ready to saw a few logs, a cock robin darted about the mill and squalled spitefully at him. Why the noisy bird waa so cross Mr. Wickham couldn't make out, but he learned pretty soon after lie had hoisted the gate and sot the mill n-golug. On the top of the upright saw frame mother robin had built ber nest, and she was sitting on it when the machinery began to make the saw fly up and down. The quick, downward strokes came mighty near pulling the nest away from her, but she clung fast and kept her four eggs warm. Meantime the male robin darted at Mr. Wickham every few seconds and cried at him as though he hod no business around there. The female bird's ad-, mlrable devotion to duty, and the male robin's incessant pleadlug in her behalf, touched Mr. Wickham's . sympathetic chord, ho said, and before the saw was half through tho log he shut the water off. He was in no hurry for lumber, aud he didn't try to run the saw again until after tho robins had raised their little family.--Scranton Cor. in Cincinnati Commercial Qasette. Dr. Lamcraux'B BLOOD  AND - NERVE - KING! Cures Indigestion, Liver Complaint, Constipation of the Bowels, etc. A Perfectly Safe and Reliable Purgative Medicine. Price, 50 cents per bottle. WORLD'S CURE FOR PAIN! A never failing. Remedy for all Aches and Pains, such as Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Headache, Toothache, Sprains, Bruises, etc. Midland Pharmacy, Agents. The trade supplied. w. A Drag l>�aler*i Love Potions. A lady very heavily veiled entered a Seventh street drug store and said, behind her mask of impenetrable block: "I wish to get some lovo medicine." VGreat Cupid!" thought a bystander who overheard tho remark, "does she want to get into it or out of it!" Tho dork waited until she explained that sho wanted something for the young man'b coffee that would rouse his affections. Then he obligingly retired to the compounding room, and returning handed her a tiny package, for which she paid him a dollar. As the lady left thu store the bystander inquired "Now, what in the name of Hippocrates himself did you give that girir "Oh, nothing," ho answered, "but a little alcohol mixed with some cochineal. If I didn't sell her sometsling somebody else would, and I may as well get the dollar as the other man. If I had asked her 90 she would have paid it just as quickly. That% nothing," he added; "we often have such calls, and even stranger ones."-Bt Paul Pioneer Press. The Umhnella liang Age* It is not known definitely when umbrellas were invented, but something of the sort must have been constructed about the year 800 of our era, for In the year 803 Alcuin, bishop of Tours, sent a present to Bishop Aruo, of Salzburg, with these words: "I have sent your reverence a Bcreou which will protect your venerable head from the beating rain." Whatever the contrivance was it must then have been something strange and rare, otherwise ft would hardly havo been worth sending 500 miles.-Philadelphia Times. ; Appropriate Selection. "Beforo we tako up tho collection this morning," remarked the good pastor, aa he looked mildly over tho congregation, "I wish to say that we have in the church treasury already two quarts of nickels that appear to have been punched through and afterwards plugged with lead. These coins, I am informed, will not buy stamps, groceries or fuel, and conductors on street cars refuse to take them. The choir will please sing, 'O, Land of Rest, for Thee I Sigh.'"-Chicago Tribune. Symptoms of Tea l?oi*ou\D%. Tea poisoning Is most common with the young and an ornate, though it affects those with good constitutions, toxic effects being produced by about five cups a day. The symptoms ore nausea, dyspepsia, palpitation, nervous excitement and even maniacal attacks, with pains of the heart radiating to the arms and chest.-Cor. Washington Star. Three J�mperors for Godfathers. Not many cau boast of having had three emperors as godfathers for three of their sous. There is*a brawny smith in the little town of Bradeoburg who has ton sons. Em-peror William I was godfather to his seventh boy, Emperor Frederick to his eighth and thu present emperor to his ninth.-Exchange. A Fine Distinction.. Under tho laws of New Jersey a "dinor-derly person" may be a person who "stands and looks over a fence at a woman standing on a step ladder to wash a kitchen window." A man's privileges are being whittled down pretty thin nowadays.-Detroit Free Press, A Heavy Family. The aggregate woi t of tbe family of Eaaao CJloer, of Bowd..ji, consisting of himself, wife and four child nm, is lJiOO pounds. -Savannah News, The Abase of CofCee. . Dr, F. Mendel has recently enjoyed opportunities of studying the results of an unbridled abuse or coSee, and his results are now published. Tt� great industrial center round �steo includes a very Urge female population. While tbe women of the working classes In this oountry are often addicted to dosing themselves with tea that had stood too long, it appears that the workmen's wires at Efcseo drink coffee from morning till night. Some consume over a poun4 of Ceylon coffee wo&kly, and one pound contains over sixty-four grains of caffeine. In consequence, nanwpjfcMu*^ ITnreeopiIscd Honse. A remarkable fact, bearing on the subject of an unrecognized sense, is mentioned by Mr, Levy. A naturalist extracted the eyes of seror&i bats and covered the empty sockets with leather. In this condition tho bats flew about tbe room, avoiding the sides, aud flying out of the door without touching tho door case. In flying through a bower which mado u right angle they turuod at tho proper point. They flew through threads suspended from the ceiling without touching them, though they were ouly far enough apart to admit tho passage of the bats' extended wings.-New York Telegram. What a Pull It. But is favoritism a real ad van ta got On tbe contrary, It ia a trap to catch a fool. A pull is a snaro; it isn't business. It doesn't mean brains, nor Industry, nor value in tho goods. It means getting on advautogo for nothing. It eh eats the undo, the nephew, und the public A pull is a fraud hi its essential nature. A pull means a cut across lots, while honest men are traveling round tbe road. A pull hi exasperating to the honest toiler. Poor wretch! while he is putting in his best work to win on his merits, this cheap John with.a pull gets there first with his shoddy.-New York Weekly. The First Irltfli Lltioo. In modern times the manufacture of linen arrived at the greatest perfection in Flanders, and It was uot in common use iu England till 1253, when it was introduced by the Flemings, woolen shirts having been woru beforo that time. In 1308 a company was formed in London, England, for manufacturing it, and Lord Wentworth introduced it Into Ireland in 1G34. Tho inhabitants, however, long excelled us in its fabrication, and the finest Linens, called Holland, were imported.-Dry Good? Chronic!a PROFESSIONAL CARDS, DBKTISIB. U WEN BLOW, Dentin, Work marulMd. Offlca, U nam, am *� V, Math Mali, itraet. psnmoiajui. Dlmmolth, Kjre, Ear, Mom; and _ Throat. Office So. 1. North Main atrMt. HaaMenca Grace Chnrch Hector/. Office hours t.to 1U180 a. m., 3 to 4 p. m. T0B PRINTING Book Making 8. B. BIDUMOBB, PhyatoUa and laitioii, OfloaomBldUagar'a drug ntore. onT te  phono, II { residence 66. W. KoKiaNKX FbTSIolan and Sorceoa. Offlce orer Ko. SO, tout* Main etnal T. P. BOBSRT80S, Fhyatotan and Sarsaon. Olica, rooma 9 aad t, oTOrpoatoflloe. J �. KALOOUt, Pnyalotan and Burgeon. (Hoauepathlc) Offlca, 111 lit aTjnne < ^ M. HUTCHINSON, M. Homaopathlo Phjrakdan and Onrcaoa and Speclallat In rectal dlaeeeee.  Fl  cm wlthoit the nee ot knife or Ugatnre.  Offlce No IB North Main etreet,room T orer Toons Broa tore. Residence No. 22a Fifth aveane win. ATXOKNVTB. "^StblawXhmphmyT* Attorneys at �*w, 0�ce OTerFLit National Bank.  Batraaee o> Sherman street. ^yHiTBBina * qlxason. Attorneys at JLat?. Office, rooms:, a, s, 4, otoi No. 3t Eiuth Main in M' coabtnbt a WIBB, Attorney* at Xtaw, Offloe, Rooms 10 and U Hasonlc Temple, �u oer ataln and Sherman. gILAS BHOADB8, La wye,, Offlce orer First NatlonaUbank. w. n. x.sw18. a. nana, J^BWISAFUBOB, 'Attorney, .t Lew, Hntchlnsan, Kaunas. , Booms 11 and IS No South Main street JQATIDSOH A WIT.T.iaMH, Lawyer., Booma 1 and 2 over Kanaga'e store. JlAYLOn, JONKB A TAYLOR, Atterneye at Law, Offlce, up-statrs, Masonic temple. QARBT A BJSB2JN0, Attorneys at Lav, CO. KlikUng, County Attorney. Booau 1 and i, HldUnxer block. J^.oltkbb. Attorney at Lsv, Offlce, south Hsin ittNt, near cotirt hotis*. P BOy. a H. OAKBB, Ijaoner ot Piano, Organ, Ylolln, 03l�u afeale studio, room No. 42, Hotel Brunewl Poaond Avenue �aat. amamon. T.1DBPI.Y. Room 8 Pint National Bonk bonding, Batch insou, Kansas. p A. GABTHBtt, Architect, Zimmerman ball ding, Hatclilnson, Kansas. A liorse That Didn't Llico Cats. Farmer Thurber, of Maurice, Pa., saw a cat rubbing its side* against his stallion's forelegs and making friends with the horse. At first the stallion appeared to be friendly toward the cat, lowering his nose and letting the cat rub against it All at once the horse seized the cat by the neck and savagely beat it against thu side of the rtall. The cat scratched the stallion's under jaw, but the enraged horse kept shaking it until it had stopped scratching and waa limp and almost llielecs. Then the horse dropped the cat In front of his inaugir and paid no more attention to It. Whan tho farmer picked the cat up it was dead with a broken book.   ,. Former Thurber said that all thecats in the barn seemed to like to go-around the horse and make friends with hint, and the horse encouraged them until they had confidence in him. Then at the drat good chance ho would grab them by the neck with bis teeth and beat the life out of them before he lot go. After their dcuth, seven cats were found in his stall ou different mornings during the winter.-Louisville Conrii^ournaL Ddh't let'hiju. wear any garment tbat b tight enough to bind bis throat, arms, waks or wrist*- -New York World. CURE (Sec Hoadaobe and relieve ril tie troubles icel-dant to a hillone state oi the jr�teir, suoh ae Di-rdnoats, Kansas, Drowsiness, Diitrcos aftet sating. Tain la tho Bide, Ao. while tht'r most waaksabisS sacooss has been nhown la otuang SICK Hasdscha rot Carter's til lie Lhrer 7fOM ax� �o,aaU* vatasbld in Oowrtdpavtlan, curing and pre-rentlng f�igannoylageomplteWt,wMta e02iwt.nl dlsontancfthestomach,*^^ Ivrei v.  cf so many lives '*hst hcte fa wbars wei***e ou* grfctf boast. Our plLU euro it wails ethers do nut. Carter'* Little Liver Pills are very small \nd very easy to take. One or two pills mskoa dose, niey are strictly vegetable ana do uot grips a? purge, bnt by thxt -jentloiction plMtMsll who tisethem. luvls) X M oonls; five for %*. Bold by draggiats ever  /hero, or sunt by malL CARTER ^OICINE CO., Nov York. B. F. GARY, Mates & Awning Factoc Carpet Levying, Upholstering and Repairing. No. 10 Avenue A Bast. 19 it ti 21 East Sherman Street,! DOES A QENERAl -AND- inding Business, SPECIALTIES III THE BOOH DEPARTMENT. Journals, Ledgers, Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinks, Land Examiner's Books LoaD Registers, County Records, Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Real Estate Contract Books, Attorney's Collection Registers. SPECIALTIES III THE JOB Letter Heads, Packet Note Heads, Letter Note Heads, Commercial Note Heads, Small Posters, Large Postersand Bills, Pony Statements, Bill Heads, all sizes, Statements, all sizes, Abstract Books, all sizes, * Deeds, Mortgages, Leases, Etc Drafts, Bank Checks, Filing Cases, Deposit Checks, Counter Checks, Notary's Seals, Banker's Cases, Crushed Euvelopes, Document Envelopes, County and City Warrant Books The above is only a partial list of the goods we carry and the work we are prepared to execute promptly. We are making a specialty of Magazine Book Binding! and we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles and at lowest priceB. We wi�h the public to understand that we are ready and prepared to execute any kind of Printing or Book Work! Have stock forms, but can make special forms to order. We guarantee all work and solicit patronage. Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.   Address, NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO., ECutchinson, 2�as. , 1367   

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  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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